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ANTHR 1101 : FWS: Culture, Society, and Power
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This First-Year Writing Seminar is devoted to the anthropological study of the human condition.  Anthropology  examines all aspects of human experience, from the evolution of the species to contemporary challenges of politics, environment, and society.  The discipline emphasizes empirically rich field research informed by sophisticated theoretical understandings of human social life and cultural production. The diversity of anthropology's interests provides a diverse array of stimulating opportunities to write critically about the human condition. Topics vary by semester.
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ARKEO 1200 : Ancient Peoples and Places
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 1200 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A broad introduction to archaeology-the study of material remains to answer questions about the human past. Case studies highlight the variability of ancient societies and illustrate the varied methods and interpretive frameworks archaeologists use to reconstruct them. This course can serve as a platform for both archaeology and anthropology undergraduate majors.
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ANTHR 1300 : Human Evolution: Genes, Behavior, and the Fossil Record
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The evolution of humankind is explored through the fossil record, studies of the biological differences among current human populations, and a comparison with our closest relatives, the primates. This course investigates the roots of human biology and behavior with an evolutionary framework.
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ANTHR 1400 : The Comparison of Cultures
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to cultural anthropology through ethnographies, or the descriptive accounts of anthropologists. Through readings and lectures, students acquaint themselves with a number of cultures from several parts of the world. The cultures range in form from those of small-scale tribal societies to those of state societies. Throughout the course, we attempt to make sense of exotic cultures in their own terms. Attention is focused on variation in cultural patterns as they are expressed in social, economic, and ritual practices. In this encounter, the principles of anthropology, as a comparative enterprise that poses distinct cultural systems in relief, will be developed. Fiction, films, and exercises supplement the formal anthropological materials.
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ANTHR 1520 : Tamil Conversation in Context
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 1700 : Indigenous North America
Crosslisted as: AIIS 1100, AMST 1600 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the diverse cultures, histories and contemporary situations of the Indigenous peoples of North America. Students will also be introduced to important themes in the post-1492 engagement between Indigenous and settler populations in North America and will consider the various and complex ways in which that history affected - and continues to affect - American Indian peoples and societies. Course materials draw on the humanities, social sciences, and expressive arts.
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ANTHR 1900 : Global Engagements: Living and Working in a Diverse World
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The path to global citizenship begins with a facility in navigating cultural difference. How do we engage with communities, whether here in Ithaca or across the globe, whose pasts and present understandings are fundamentally different than our own? This course is designed to help students bring global engaged learning into their Cornell education. It introduces skills vital to engaging cultural difference, including participant-observation research, ethnographic writing, and the habits of critical reflexivity. The course emphasizes strategies for understanding others and grappling with one's own identity. Students will conduct projects with service learning placements in the Ithaca community.
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ARKEO 2010 : Archaeology of the Ancient Near East
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2010, NES 2610 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Near East is often defined by "firsts": the first cities, writing, and complex societies. Archaeology has long looked to the region for explanations of the origins of civilization. The Middle East has also long been a place where archaeology and politics are inextricably intertwined, from Europe's 19th century appropriation of the region's heritage, to the looting and destruction of antiquities in recent wars in Syria and Iraq. This introductory course moves between past and present. It offers a survey of 10,000 years of human history, from the appearance of farming villages to the dawn of imperialism, while also engaging current debates on the contemporary stakes of archaeology in the Middle East. Covering Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Iran, and the Caucasus, our focus is on past material worlds and the modern politics in which they are entangled.
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ANTHR 2201 : Early Agriculture
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2201 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Throughout most of the human career, people survived by hunting and gathering wild foods. The advent of food production is one of the most profound changes in (pre)history. This course examines the current evidence for the appearance and spread of agriculture (plant and animal domestication) around the world. We will consider definitions of agriculture and domestication, the conditions under which it arises, the consequences for those who adopt it, and why it has spread over most of the world.
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ARKEO 2215 : Stone Age Art
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2215 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
When did "art," however defined, appear during the human career, how was it produced and for what purposes? These are some of the questions we will investigate through a survey of the discovery, validation, analysis, and interpretation of the earliest art. The course will cover a variety of finds from the Old World, including the well-known cave art of southwestern France and northern Spain, and also consider portable art and decoration. The contributions of new analytical techniques and interpretive approaches are highlighted.
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ARKEO 2235 : Archaeology of North American Indians
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2350, AMST 2350, ANTHR 2235 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This introductory course surveys archaeology's contributions to the study of American Indian cultural diversity and change in North America north of Mexico. Lectures and readings will examine topics ranging from the debate over when the continent was first inhabited to present-day conflicts between Native Americans and archaeologists over excavation and the interpretation of the past. We will review important archaeological sites such as Chaco Canyon, Cahokia, Lamoka Lake, and the Little Bighorn battlefield. A principal focus will be on major transformations in lifeways such as the adoption of agriculture, the development of political-economic hierarchies, and the disruptions that accompanied the arrival of Europeans to the continent.
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ARKEO 2245 : Health and Disease in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2245 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The history of humankind is also a history of health and disease; the rise of agricultural societies, ancient cities, and colonial empires had wide-ranging effects on diet and nutrition, the spread of infectious diseases, and occurrence of other health conditions. This history has also been shaped by complex interactions between environment, technology, and society. Using archaeological, environmental, textual, and skeletal evidence, we will survey major epidemiological transitions from the Paleolithic to the age of European conquest. We will also examine diverse cultural experiences of health, illness, and the body. How do medical practices from "pre-modern" socieites, such as the medieval Islamic world and the Inca Empire, challenge dominant narratives of scientific development? The implications of past health patterns for modern-day communities will also be explored.
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ARKEO 2285 : Egyptomania: Imagining Egypt in the Greco-Roman World
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2285, CLASS 2685, NES 2985 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Throughout Greek and Roman history, the idea of Egypt inspired powerful imaginative responses ranging from fascination to fear. This course investigates Egyptian interactions with the Greco-Roman world and the changing Greek and Roman attitudes towards Egypt. Readings will cover subjects including the earliest Egyptian-Aegean trade, Herodotus' accounts of Egypt, Greco-Macedonian kings on the throne of the pharaohs, Roman perceptions of the notorious Cleopatra, the worship of Egyptian gods in the Greco-Roman world, and the incorporation of Egypt into the Roman empire (among other topics). Through an examination of Greek and Roman representations of Egypt, we will investigate how Greeks and Romans conceived of their own societies and cultural identities. Finally, we will also address images of Egypt in modern popular culture; how have Greco-Roman portrayals of Egypt helped shape today's view of the Pharaonic world?
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ANTHR 2310 : The Natural History of Chimpanzees and the Origins of Politics
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course will examine the natural history of wild chimpanzees with an eye toward better understanding the changes that would have been necessary in human evolutionary history to promote the emergence of human culture and political life. After an overview of early research and preliminary attempts to apply our knowledge of chimpanzee life to social and political theory, the class will focus on our now extensive knowledge of chimpanzees derived from many ongoing, long-term field studies. Topics of particular interest include socialization, alliance formation and cooperation, aggression within and between the sexes, reconciliation, the maintenance of traditions, tool use, nutritional ecology and social organization, territorial behavior, and the importance of kin networks. The question of whether apes should have rights will also be explored.
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ANTHR 2400 : Cultural Diversity and Contemporary Issues
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course will introduce students to the meaning and significance of forms of cultural diversity for the understanding of contemporary issues. Drawing from films, videos, and selected readings, students will be confronted with different representational forms that portray cultures in various parts of the world, and they will be asked to examine critically their own prejudices as they influence the perception and evaluation of cultural differences. We shall approach cultures holistically, assuming the inseparability of economies, kinship, religion, and politics, as well as interconnections and dependencies between world areas (e.g., Africa, Latin America, the West). Among the issues considered: "political correctness" and truth; nativism and ecological diversity; race, ethnicity, and sexuality; sin, religion, and war; global process and cultural integrity.
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ANTHR 2410 : South Asian Diaspora
Crosslisted as: AAS 2100 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This interdisciplinary course (with an emphasis in anthropology) will introduce students to the multiple routes/roots, lived experiences, and imagined worlds of South Asians who have traveled to various lands at different historical moments spanning Fiji, South Africa, Mauritius, Britain, Malaysia, United States, Trinidad, and even within South Asia itself such as the Tamil-speaking population of Sri Lanka. The course will begin with the labor migrations of the 1830s and continue up to the present period. The primary exercise will be to compare and contrast the varied expressions of the South Asian Diaspora globally in order to critically evaluate this transnational identity. Thus, we will ask what, if any, are the ties that bind a fifth-generation Indo-Trinidadian whose ancestor came to the New World as an indentured laborer or "coolie" in the mid-19th century to labor in the cane fields, to a Pakistani medical doctor who migrated to the United States in the late 1980s. If Diaspora violates a sense of identity based on territorial integrity, then could "culture" serve as the basis for a shared identity?
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ANTHR 2421 : Sex and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Crosslisted as: FGSS 2421, LGBT 2421 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to the anthropology of sex, sexuality and gender, this course uses case studies from around the world to explore how the worlds of the sexes become gendered.  In ethnographic, ethnohistorical and contemporary globalizing contexts, we will look at: intersexuality & 'supernumerary' genders; physical & cultural reproduction; sexuality; and sex- & gender-based violence & power. We will use lectures, films, discussion sections and short field-based exercises.
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ANTHR 2433 : Anthropology of Law and Politics
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The need to monitor human behavior and regulate order among individuals and groups is inherent to the human condition. This course is a basic introduction to the ways in which anthropology has examined legal and political processes across diverse societies and cultures. Students will learn foundational anthropological and legal principles and how they are applied among specific sociocultural groups.
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ANTHR 2465 : Global Heritage
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2465, NES 2565 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
"Heritage" typically conjures images of a glorified human past, and evokes sentiments of care for lost or endangered cultures that symbolize humanity's diversity. But heritage is also the foundation for a multi-billion dollar tourist industry and a basis for claims to national sovereignty. A closer look at heritage reveals institutions, places, and things possessed of extraordinary power. Drawing on case studies from around the world, this course attends to the complexities of heritage today. Topics include heritage ethics, tourism and the marketing of the past, approaches to preservation and management, disputed heritage and violence, heritage ideologies from nationalism to universalism, participation and inequality from the grassroots to the global, "counterheritage", and the practice of public archaeology. Students apply insights gained by designing projects as heritage practitioners, engaged with "heritage-scapes" at Cornell and beyond.
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ANTHR 2468 : Medicine, Culture, and Society
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2468, STS 2468 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Medicine has become the language and practice through which we address a broad range of both individual and societal complaints. Interest in this "medicalization of life" may be one of the reasons that medical anthropology is currently the fastest-growing subfield in anthropology. This course encourages students to examine concepts of disease, suffering, health, and well-being in their immediate experience and beyond. In the process, students will gain a working knowledge of ecological, critical, phenomenological, and applied approaches used by medical anthropologists. We will investigate what is involved in becoming a doctor, the sociality of medicines, controversies over new medical technologies, and the politics of medical knowledge. The universality of biomedicine (or hospital medicine) will not be taken for granted, but rather we will examine the plurality generated by the various political, economic, social, and ethical demands under which biomedicine has developed in different places and at different times. In addition, biomedical healing and expertise will be viewed in relation to other kinds of healing and expertise. Our readings will address medicine in North America as well as other parts of the world. In class, our discussions will return regularly to consider the broad diversity of kinds of medicine throughout the world, as well as the specific historical and local contexts of biomedicine.
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ARKEO 2522 : Drinking in the Ages: Intoxicating Beverages in Near Eastern and World History
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2630, JWST 2522, NES 2522 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the production and exchange of wine, beer, coffee and tea, and the social and ideological dynamics involved in their consumption. We start in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and end with tea and coffee in the Arab and Ottoman worlds. Archaeological and textual evidence will be used throughout to show the centrality of drinking in daily, ritual and political life.
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ANTHR 2546 : South Asian Religions in Practice: The Healing Traditions
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2254 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course offers an anthropological approach to the study of religious traditions and practices in South Asia (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Nepal). The course begins with a short survey of the major religious traditions of South Asia: Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, and Islam. We look to the development of these traditions through historical and cultural perspectives. The course then turns to the modern period, considering the impact of colonialism, nationalism, and globalization upon religious ideologies and practices. The primary focus of the course will be the ethnographic study of contemporary religious practices in the region. We examine phenomena such as ritual, pilgrimage, possession, devotionalism, monasticism, asceticism, and revivalism through a series of ethnographic case studies. In so doing, we also seek to understand the impact of politics, modernity, diasporic movement, social inequality, changing gender roles, and mass mediation upon these traditions and practices.
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ARKEO 2620 : Laboratory in Landscape Archaeology
Crosslisted as: LA 2620 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Various American Indian civilizations and European cultures have altered the landscape to meet the needs of their cultures. Students learn how to interpret the Euro-American landscapes of a buried village excavated by Cornell students.  The students will identify and date artifacts, stud soil samples, and create site maps.
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ARKEO 2662 : Daily Life in the Biblical World
Crosslisted as: JWST 2662, NES 2662, RELST 2662 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 2668 : Ancient Egyptian Civilization
Crosslisted as: NES 2668 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The course surveys the history and culture of pharaonic Egypt from its prehistoric origins down to the early first millennium bce. Within a chronological framework, the following themes or topics will be considered: the development of the Egyptian state (monarchy, administration, ideology), social organization (class, gender and family, slavery), economic factors, and empire and international relations.
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ARKEO 2688 : Cleopatra's Egypt: Tradition and Transformation
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2688, NES 2688 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Under a Greco-Macedonian ruling dynasty, the Ptolemies, Egypt became a crossroads for the entire Mediterranean. Popular culture today remembers Ptolemaic Egypt best for the exploits of the famous queen Cleopatra, but a deeper study of this diverse society provides a unique window onto the ways that Greeks and Egyptians viewed the concepts of "Hellenicity" and "Egyptianness." In this course, we will examine a variety of social, political, economic, and cultural perspectives on Ptolemaic Egypt and its relationships with the rest of the Mediterranean world. Topics include (1) the political and economic history of Ptolemaic Egypt; (2) the multicultural character of Ptolemaic society; (3) the interaction of Greek and Egyptian religious systems, and the creation of "fusion" gods; (4) Ptolemaic relations with the rest of the Hellenistic world and beyond; and (5) the relevance of Ptolemaic Egypt to an understanding of modern phenomena such as globalism, tourism, and colonialism.
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ARKEO 2700 : Introduction to Art History: The Classical World in 24 Objects
Crosslisted as: ARTH 2200, CLASS 2700 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Why did the Gorgon turn people into stone? Did Cleopatra really have such a big nose? Did the Romans make wax death masks? Should the British Museum return the Parthenon Marbles to Greece? Come and explore all these questions and more in "An Introduction to the Ancient World in 24 Objects". Each class will focus on a single artefact, showing how it is exemplary of key trends and historical moments in Greek and Roman culture, from the temples of ancient Athens to the necropoleis of Roman Egypt and the rainy outposts of Hadrian's Wall. In addition to the history of Greco-Roman art in antiquity, we will explore the influence of Classical art on later Western culture. While focusing on major monuments from Classical antiquity in class, we will also examine Cornell's collection of plaster casts, ancient objects in the Johnson Museum, and the Greek and Roman collections in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York
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ARKEO 2710 : Roman Wall Painting
Crosslisted as: ARTH 2710, CLASS 2710 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Some of our very best evidence for Roman art survives in the form of frescoes in Rome, Ostia and (especially) the area surrounding Pompeii. This course will take you through imperial palaces, rural villas, town houses, shops, baths, tombs, taverns and gardens, examining the visual dynamics and socio-cultural significance of wall-paintings within their original archaeological contexts. The study of frescoes offers an exciting means of tackling important questions relating to Roman social history (issues of class, gender, familial and political structures), while inviting us to explore visual themes such as the relationship between art and nature, the use of myth, the spatial dynamics of domestic decorative schemes and concepts of ornament.
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ARKEO 2711 : Archaeology of the Roman world: Italy and the West
Crosslisted as: ARTH 2711, CLASS 2711 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Roman period has given us a density of archaeological remains that remains unsurpassed in world history, and these have been studied since the very birth of archaeology. As a result, Roman archaeology allows us to explore questions that historians and archaeologists of other periods often cannot. Within this rich body of archaeological evidence, this course will focus on key themes and material for the Roman period in Italy and the Western provinces (especially Gaul and Britain). Central topics include imperialism, urbanism, economy, and social life. What was the archaeological imprint of conquest? How did goods travel around such a wide geographical expanse? What images did people in Britain have of the emperor? We will investigate particular types of evidence, from public monuments over ceramic amphorae to the road system. And we will explore methodological issues, such as what archaeological evidence can tell us, or how to introduce protagonists other than emperors and armies in our reconstructions of the Roman world. Throughout the course, we will question whether the modern world is a productive and valid parallel for archaeological study of the Roman world.
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ANTHR 2750 : Human Biology and Evolution
Crosslisted as: NS 2750 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Examines the theories and mechanisms of modern evolutionary biology as they apply to present-day humans and their hominid ancestors. Lectures and discussions of molecular and paleontological evidence of human evolution, the causes and consequences of contemporary human biological diversity, and biological and behavioral modes of human adaptation to past and present natural and cultural environments.
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ANTHR 2846 : Magic and Witchcraft in the Greco-Roman World
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2846, CLASS 2646, NES 2546 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Modern perceptions of Classical civilizations often stress those aspects of their cultures that are compatible with contemporary concepts of "rational thought." Certainly, Greek and Roman scholars did make great achievements in science, medicine, and philosophy - but these multifaceted societies also had a place for magical amulets, love potions, and curse tablets. Drawing on both archaeological and textual evidence, we will (1) investigate a range of ancient and modern approaches to the concept of "magic," and (2) explore the role of magical practices in ancient Greek and Roman society.
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ANTHR 2935 : Criminal Justice and Prison Worlds
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
A broad introduction to the study of crime and punishment, ethnographies of prison systems, and criminal justice.  We will analyze the myriad forms of criminal justice labor required to capture, segregate, pacify, and manage problematically growing numbers of subjects caught up in the justice system.  Each student will be required to "shadow" or "assist" local legal groups, state officials, or social justice organizations.  Such engaged "micro-internships" will allow students to follow state prosecutors, public defenders, judges, police departments, prisoner and victim rights groups, parole officers, prisoner reentry services, anti-prison activists, or prison guard unions—among other possibilities. In the process, students will learn precisely how "carcerality" —or the "carceral continuum"—works in practice through sets of binding social, economic, and political relations to criminalized populations.
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ANTHR 3000 : Introduction to Anthropological Theory
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar course is designed to give anthropology majors an introduction to classical and contemporary social and anthropological theory and to help prepare them for upper-level seminars in anthropology. The seminar format emphasizes close reading and active discussion of key texts and theorists. The reading list will vary from year to year but will include consideration of influential texts and debates in 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century anthropological theory especially as they have sought to offer conceptual and analytical tools for making sense of human social experience and cultural capacities.
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ARKEO 3000 : Undergraduate Independent Study in Archaeology and Related Fields
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Undergraduate students pursue topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member.
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ARKEO 3000 : Undergraduate Independent Study in Archaeology and Related Fields
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Undergraduate students pursue topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member.
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ANTHR 3020 : Representing Brooklyn: Race, Place and Popular Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 3020, ASRC 3020 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Hip Hop Brooklyn. Hipster Brooklyn. Immigrant Brooklyn. Brownstone Brooklyn. This course borrows from hip hop's notion of "representing" to explore popular and cultural understandings of race and place in Brooklyn as depicted in print, music, film, and online. How is Brooklyn represented? Who represents Brooklyn? What do these representations reveal about Black cultural production, inequality, and identity formation more broadly speaking? While today Brooklyn is New York City's hippest borough and the site of swift gentrification, booming real estate, and the ever-escalating displacement of immigrant and Black communities, in the 1980s and 1990s it was a hotbed of hip hop music, making the borough synonymous with Black cultural production. Now a "global brand," New York's most populous borough is still the home of the nation's most concentrated Black population. The course examines Black cultural production as it relates to representations of Brooklyn. It also deconstructs images and discourses that marginalize the borough's Black residents. Spanning the period from 1945 to the present day, emphases will include the grassroots movements of the 1960s-1970s, the commodification of hip hop in the 1980s-1990s, and close readings of films including Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing," to reflect on how Black popular culture engages with Brooklyn's diverse communities. While materials are interdisciplinary in approach, our investigation is informed by anthropological, historical, and literary texts covering topics including immigration, youth culture, transnationalism, gentrification, authenticity, and classed, gendered and racialized inequality.
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ANTHR 3061 : Computing Cultures
Crosslisted as: COMM 3560, INFO 3561, STS 3561, VISST 3560 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Computers are powerful tools for working, playing, thinking, and living. Laptops, PDAs, webcams, cell phones, and iPods are not just devices, they also provide narratives, metaphors, and ways of seeing the world. This course critically examines how computing technology and society shape each other and how this plays out in our everyday lives. Identifies how computers, networks, and information technologies reproduce, reinforce, and rework existing cultural trends, norms, and values. Looks at the values embodied in the cultures of computing and considers alternative ways to imagine, build, and work with information technologies.
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ARKEO 3090 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
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ARKEO 3130 : Iconography of Greek Myth
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3230, CLASS 3727 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Myths are traditional tales. Their authority becomes apparent in that they were constantly adapted to changing social, political, cultural, etc. conditions. Although this seems to be a widely accepted definition so far, it is deeply influenced by Greek tradition. Not only is the term mythos (word, tale) Greek, but the ubiquity of Greek gods, heroes, and their deeds in ancient literature and material culture has given myths an importance they might not have had in other cultures. This class will give an overview of the most important Greek myths and mythological figures as depicted in Greek and Roman times. The chronological frame will range from the seventh century bc to the third century ad. We will discuss the iconography of the Olympian gods and their escorts; of myths such as the loves of the gods; the battles between the Olympian Gods and the Giants, between Greeks and Amazons as well as between Lapiths and Centaurs; the Trojan War; the adventures of Odysseus; the heroic deeds of Heracles, Theseus and Perseus among others. By analyzing where and when mythological images were on display it will become clear how myths were adapted to their specific context as well as why certain myths were more often depicted or more popular than others.
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ARKEO 3210 : Historical Archaeology
Crosslisted as: AMST 3200, AMST 6210, ANTHR 3210, ANTHR 6210, ARKEO 6210 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course uses artifacts, spaces, and texts to examine the emergence of the "modern world" in the 500-plus years since Columbus.  This is a distinctive sub-field of archaeology, not least because modern attitudes toward economic systems, race relations, and gender roles emerged during this period.  We will read classic and contemporary texts to unearth the physical histories of contemporary ideas, including coverage of the archaeologies of capitalism, colonialism, gender relations, the African diaspora, ethnogenesis, and conflicts over the use of the past in the present.
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ARKEO 3232 : Politics of the Past
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3232, ANTHR 6232, ARKEO 6232 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Archaeology has never operated in a vacuum. This course examines the political context of the study of the past, and the uses to which accounts of the past have been put in the present. Archaeology is often implicated in nationalist claims to territory, or claims of ethnic, racial, or religious superiority. Museum exhibits and other presentations to the public always have an agenda, consciously or otherwise. Archaeologists are increasingly required to interact with descendent communities, often in the context of postcolonial tensions. The antiquities trade and the protection of archaeological sites connects archaeologists to commercial and law enforcement sectors. We will also consider the internal politics of the practice of archaeology in various settings, including the implications of the funding sources that support archaeological work. This course is open to students of archaeology, socio-cultural anthropology, history, and other disciplines with an interest in the past.
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ANTHR 3235 : Bioarchaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6235, ARKEO 3235, ARKEO 6235 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.  
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ANTHR 3390 : Primate Behavior and Ecology with Emphasis on African Apes
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The course will investigate all aspects of non-human primate life. Based on the fundamentals of evolutionary theory, group and inter-individual behaviors will be presented. In addition, an understanding of group structure and breeding systems will be reached through an evaluation of ecological constraints imposed on primates in different habitats. Subjects include: primate taxonomy, diet and foraging, predation, cooperation and competition, social ontogeny, kinship, and mating strategies.
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ANTHR 3420 : Myth, Ritual, and Symbol
Crosslisted as: RELST 3420 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Examines how systems of thought, symbolic forms, and ritual practice are formulated and expressed in primarily non-Western societies. Focuses on anthropological interpretations of space, time, cosmology, myth, classificatory systems (e.g., color, totems, food, dress, kinship), taboos, sacrifice, witchcraft, sorcery, and rites of passage (birth, initiation, marriage, death). Examines both the roles of specialists (e.g., spirit mediums, curers, priests, ascetics) and nonspecialists in producing these cultural forms.
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ANTHR 3428 : Conflict, Dispute Resolution, and Law in Cultural Context
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Rule-making and dispute resolution are integral aspects of social reality in any culture. The ways in which conflict is treated and interpreted -- to be then deflected or resolved -- articulate with other cultural domains such as religion, politics, and economics as part of the material and symbolic processes that enable sociocultural interaction. At issue then are the formal and processual means that the treatment of conflict takes in different societies. These means constitute frames for the definition of social experience that are used by social actors in the interpretation of events within the terms of an overriding sociocultural logic that is in turn refigured by these interpretive frames.
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ANTHR 3432 : Hasidism: History, Community, Thought
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6432, JWST 3432, NES 3432, RELST 3432, RELST 6432 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The modern Jewish religious movement known as Hasidism began in Eastern Europe in the eighteenth century and thrives today.  We will approach Hasidism primarily through three avenues: recent critical social history; selections from Hasidic literature; and ethnographic accounts of Hasidic life today. By the end of the semester, students will be able to articulate some ways that Hasidism reflects both broader trends in European religious and moral thought of its time, and some ways that it represents distinctively Jewish developments. You will also gain a deeper appreciation of the various kinds of evidence and disciplinary approaches that need to be brought to bear on the attempt to articulate as broad, deep and varied a phenomenon as modern Hasidic Judaism. 
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ANTHR 3437 : Global Fantasies, Global Realities, Global Nightmares
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6437 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course offers a synthetic perspective on a spectrum of currently troubling phenomena -- the rise of authoritarian populism, growing inequality, racism, misogyny, nationalism, war. In particular, it links macro-scale and historical theories regarding global processes (e.g., "world systems," "globalization"), on the one hand, and the more intimate correlates of these macro forces shaping individual experience, on the other.  Drawing from anthropology as well as from cognate disciplines (political economy, history, and psychology), the course surveys and assesses both case studies of phenomena such as the self-delusion of the oppressed, the narcissism of dictators, and how the making and remaking of social identities relate to world economic cycles.  Course readings highlight how fantasy, imagination, hope and fear figure crucially in people's apprehensions of the contemporary world. 
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ANTHR 3476 : Philosophy and Anthropology Together
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6476 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Philosophy remains anthropology's closest sister-discipline, or even its mother-discipline. Anthropology and philosophy are both dedicated to self-understanding: seeking to figure out what it is to be human, and what this means for us, raising questions such as how we can know the world, and ourselves, and how we should live;  the relationship between language, culture and the world; how we differ from other animals; and much more. Both disciplines have tried to generalize about humanity, but because of its acute awareness of cultural diversity, the younger field of anthropology diverged from philosophy. In this course we re-build a "philosophically aware anthropology," and take philosophy to task, by way of inspired readings carried out in a sympathetic yet critical spirit: We discuss a selection of important philosophers' and anthropologists' writings, and interdisciplinary dialogues.
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ANTHR 3479 : Culture, Language, and Thought
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The relationship among culture, language, and thought has been a core concern in anthropology. Language and culture are commonly defined as processes that are public and shared yet they also operate within and upon subliminal experiential realms. In this course we shall examine how anthropologists have explored this relationship, which is engendered in the interaction between culture and language as parallel mediating devices for the constitution, interpretation, and expression of human experience.
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ARKEO 3662 : Sumerian Language and Culture II
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6662, NES 3662, NES 6662 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course continues to expose students to the earliest written language, Sumerian, begun in Sumerian Language and Culture I. It also tackles important historical and cultural questions of third millennium Mesopotamia, especially from 2500-2000 BCE.  Each week will explore the specifics of Sumerian grammar and phonology through increasingly complex Sumerian documents.  This semester focuses on Sumerian business, government, and economic documents as well as the language of Sumerian literature.  Extra readings and discussion will provide a sense of the deep roots of the Sumerian historical memory and the problems and research questions that interest Sumerologists, such as reconstructing trading networks, the working classes, ancient taxation, and scribal training.  Students will also be encouraged to explore the ways that the field of Sumerology has embraced digital technology.
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ANTHR 3703 : Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective
Crosslisted as: AAS 3030, AMST 3703 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The common perception of ethnicity is that it is a "natural" and an inevitable consequence of cultural difference. "Asians" overseas, in particular, have won repute as a people who cling tenaciously to their culture and refuse to assimilate into their host societies and cultures. But, who are the "Asians?" On what basis can we label "Asians" an ethnic group? Although there is a significant Asian presence in the Caribbean, the category "Asian" itself does not exist in the Caribbean. What does this say about the nature of categories that label and demarcate groups of people on the basis of alleged cultural and phenotypical characteristics? This course will examine the dynamics behind group identity, namely ethnicity, by comparing and contrasting the multicultural experience of Asian populations in the Caribbean and the United States. Ethnographic case studies will focus on the East Indian and Chinese experiences in the Caribbean and the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipino, and Indian experiences in the United States.
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ARKEO 3710 : Humans and the Ancient Mediterranean Environment
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7710, CLASS 3710, CLASS 7710, NES 3610, NES 7710 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The Eastern Mediterranean is an ecologically diverse and varied landscape with a rich cultural heritage for studying long-term human-environmental interactions.  In this course we will explore how human activities such as mining, logging, water management, agriculture, and animal husbandry in antiquity impacted the area's environment, as well as how past pollution, disease, and sanitation affected human health.  We will investigate different environmental case studies spanning the last 10,000 years in the East Mediterranean, and their relationship to the area's modern environmental issues.  Particular emphasis will be made on examining how paleoecological, geomorphological, archaeological, and textual evidence may be used together to reconstruct past human-environmental interactions.  Students will also have the opportunity to explore their own topics of interest in Mediterranean environmental history.
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ARKEO 3712 : Archaeological Perspectives on the Rural Landscape
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7712, CLASS 3712, CLASS 7712 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This class overviews perspectives relevant to an archaeological understanding of ancient and pre-modern rural landscapes. During this course the students will engage with (a) textual evidence that describes agricultural methods as well as social relations surrounding peasants and farmers in the classical world, (b) anthropological studies exploring the urban/rural dynamics, (c) sociological studies ranging from Wolf's seminal Peasants to more recent ethnographic studies focusing on the Mediterranean, (d) archaeological methods implemented in the reconstruction of past environment and landscapes (palaeobotany, Geographic Information Systems).
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ARKEO 3738 : Identity in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: CLASS 3738, RELST 3738 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Have you ever been asked 'who are you' or 'which group do you belong to'? You would have noted how the answer shifts according to who is asking, in which context, etc. While everyone is unique, the possible replies in any one situation are largely defined at the level of society. What is less often realized, however, is that identity shows in particular in ways of doing: what and how one eats; what one wears and when; how one moves in a space. Archaeology is in a unique position to investigate these questions, and the Greek and Roman worlds offer a fruitful test ground, both because of their varied evidence, and because of their peculiar echoing in the modern world and its manifold identities. This course will address current theories about identity and its formation, discuss the various facets of identity (e.g. gender, religion, ethnicity) in the Greek and Roman worlds, and introduce tools for studying identity in the past.
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ANTHR 3777 : The United States
Crosslisted as: AMST 3777, LSP 3777 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The anthropological inquiry into one's own culture is never a neutral exercise. This course will explore issues in the cultural construction of the United States as a "pluralistic" society. We will look at the ideological context for the production of a cultural profile predicted upon ideas that are intrinsic to American images of identity such as individualism, freedom, and equality and the way these are applied in practice. The course readings will include historic documents and accounts, popular writing, and recent ethnographies on the United States.
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ARKEO 3800 : Introduction to the Arts of China
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3800, ASIAN 3383 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course offers a survey of the art and culture of China, from the Neolithic period to the 20th century. We begin with an inquiry into the meaning of national boundaries and the controversy of the Han Chinese people, which helps us identify the scope of Chinese culture. Pre-dynastic (or prehistoric) Chinese culture is presented through both legends about the origins of the Chinese, and scientifically excavated artifacts. Art of the dynastic and modern periods is presented in light of contemporaneous social, political, geographical, philosophical and religious contexts. Students work directly with objects in the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art.
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ANTHR 3901 : Going Global: Preparing for Engaged Learning
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
So you're enrolled in an upcoming study abroad program! Now what? How can you make the most of your global or engaged learning experience? This half-semester course is intended to prepare students departing on all types of engaged learning experiences or study abroad programs. The course provides the opportunity to refine the tools that enable provide the foundation for successful cross-cultural encounters, including participant-observation research, ethnographic writing, and habits of critical reflexivity. Students will prepare for their departure by researching the culture and history of their placement. Students will also consider how to succeed in a foreign academic environment by engaging with the diverse community on the Cornell campus.
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ANTHR 3902 : Coming Home: Making the Most of Engaged Experiences
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
How has your study abroad program shaped you, and what will you take from that experience going forward? How would you articulate your understanding of global citizenship? This half-semester course is intended for students returning form engaged learning experiences or study abroad programs. It provides a space for critical reflection, and students will draw on their experience to revise writing from previous courses about identity, difference, and navigating cross-cultural encounters. Students will grapple with experiences of cultural dissonance and share their experience with others. They will also contribute to the diverse community on campus and mentor younger students preparing for engaged learning opportunities.
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ANTHR 4014 : Polluted Senses
Crosslisted as: SHUM 4614 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 4020 : Designing Archaeological Exhibits
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6020, LA 4050, LA 6050 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Students will learn method and theory on museum design and curation. The course also provides hands-on experience in designing and building exhibits for State Parks in the Finger Lakes. For the outreach component, students will work with staff from State Parks and Friends of the Parks.
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ANTHR 4101 : The Entangled Lives of Humans and Animals
Crosslisted as: STS 4101 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
One animal behaviorist speculates that big brains develop when species are social; that is, when they must read cues from members of their group to understand when to approach, when to flee, when to fight, when to care. This course looks not only at animals in their social lives, but also at animals in their lives with us. We ask questions about how species become entangled and what that means for both parties, about the social lives of animals independently and with humans, about the survival of human and animal species, and about what it means to use animals for science, food, and profit. The course draws on readings from Anthropology, Science & Technology Studies, and animal trainers and behaviorists.
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ANTHR 4106 : The Powers of Skin in Africa
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4066, SHUM 4606 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This class considers the capacities and powers of skin in Africa. Students will read classic historical and ethnographic texts about practices involving skin together with range of theoretical approaches to the body. We will consider topics from beatification, scarification, witchcraft, magic, and traditional medicine to the hygiene campaigns of colonialism, the development of the dermatology as a defined specialty, the rise of global health and medical humanitarianism. Descriptive ethnographic and historical texts will be read as primary evidence along side of a range of theoretical approaches to the lived body with the intention of provoking innovative readings of these primary texts and a greater understanding of the theoretical arguments.
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ARKEO 4211 : Ceramic Analysis for Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4211, ANTHR 6211, ARKEO 6211, NES 4544, NES 6544 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Ceramics are among the most ubiquitous materials in the archaeological record. From prehistory to the present, the manipulation of clay to form pottery and other synthetic objects has transformed domains of human experience from the quotidian to the consequential. This course addresses the theories and methods that equip archaeologists to make deductions about past societies on the basis of ceramic evidence. We will examine such topics as methods of organizing and classifying ceramic data, aspects of pottery production, pottery style, form, and function, techniques of instrumental analysis, and frameworks for the interpretation of pottery that allow archaeologists to arrive at some understanding of social, political, and economic lifeways. This course entails both seminar-based instruction and hands-on laboratory skills.
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ANTHR 4235 : Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7235, ARKEO 4235, ARKEO 7235 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
"Res ipsa loquitur" -- the thing speaks for itself. This common expression captures a widespread belief about objects' roles in human lives, but "hearing" what objects have to say is actually a complex cultural process. An object rarely has a single meaning; they are read variously in different cultural settings, and even by different individuals within a cultural system. How does one know -- can one know -- the meanings of an object? How are objects strategically deployed in social interaction (particularly in cross-cultural interactions, where each side may have radically different understandings)? How does one even know what an object is? We will explore the history and variety of ways that material culture and its meanings have been studied, using archaeological and ethnographic examples.
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ARKEO 4246 : Human Osteology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4246, ANTHR 7246, ARKEO 7246 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This is an intensive laboratory course in the study of human skeletal remains. A detailed knowledge of skeletal anatomy is fundamental to forensic anthropology, bioarchaeology, and the medical sciences. This course teaches students how to identify all 206 bones and 32 teeth of the human skeleton, in both complete and fragmentary states. Students will also learn osteological methods for establishing a biological profile (age-at-death, sex, stature, and biological affinity) and documenting skeletal trauma and pathological lesions. Hands-on laboratory training will be supplemented by case studies that demonstrate the importance of human osteology for criminal investigations in the present and the study of health and violence in the past. The ethics of working with human remains are also discussed.
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ANTHR 4264 : Zooarchaeological Interpretation
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7264, ARKEO 4264, ARKEO 7264 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course follows from last semester's Zooarchaeological Method. We will shift our emphasis here from basic skills to interpretation, although you will continue to work with archaeological bones. We will begin by examining topics surrounding the basic interpretation of raw faunal data: sampling, quantification, taphonomy, seasonality. We will then explore how to use faunal data to reconstruct subsistence patterns, social structure, and human/animal relations.
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ANTHR 4390 : Primate Conservation: Cross-cultural Perspectives on Wilderness Preservation and Animal-Human
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Primate species are going extinct.  The goal of this seminar is to examine a variety of issues related to conservation in general, and to the conservation of primates in particular.  For example, what is "wilderness"?  Is there cross-cultural variation in how wild nature is valued?  Can ethics be extended beyond humans?  Is consumerism the real culprit in the global ecological crisis?  How do human and nonhuman primate ecologies intersect, and how can understanding these intersections be integrated into conservation efforts?  How, in practice, does one develop and implement a real-world conservation action plan?  Discussions will focus both on theoretical issues and on the analysis of a new generation of real-world conservation initiatives that depend on interdisciplinary collaboration.
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ANTHR 4409 : Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7409 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course is an introduction to the practice and conceptual foundations of qualitative research methods in the social sciences. Students will learn different approaches with the opportunity to experience the practical dimensions of conducting a qualitative study, including research design, participant observation, interviewing, discourse analysis, and narrative inquiry. In the process, we will explore the principles, theories and epistemologies informing various paradigms in qualitative research. What does it mean to do interpretive research? What do feminist and critical ethnographies look like? What are critical race methodologies? What does it mean to think with performativity, power, deconstruction, desire or decoloniality? We will also examine dilemmas and issues concerning ethics, informed consent, researcher positionality and relationships, and writing and reporting.
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ANTHR 4425 : Hope and Futurity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7425 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
What is hope? How is hope produced and lost? How is hope distributed in society? What role does hope play in the production of knowledge, imagination and belief? In this course, we will investigate these questions through a close examination of a full range of anthropological, sociological, literary, philosophical and religious explorations into hope and futurity.
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ANTHR 4425 : Hope and Futurity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7425 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
What is hope? How is hope produced and lost? How is hope distributed in society? What role does hope play in the production of knowledge, imagination and belief? In this course, we will investigate these questions through a close examination of a full range of anthropological, sociological, literary, philosophical and religious explorations into hope and futurity.
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ANTHR 4435 : Postcolonial Science
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7435, BSOC 4351, STS 4351 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines science and technology in so-called "non-Western" countries as well as the ways that science and technology are shaping new "transnational" or "global" relations. We will explore the post-colonial as a dynamic space that both plays off of and refigures the complicated dynamics of colonialism. The postcolonial challenges the dichotomies through which colonial power moved: western/indigenous, white/black, modern/traditional, global/local, developed/underdeveloped, and science/non-science. At the same time, it confronts the ways in which colonial histories are still embodied in institutions, identities, environments, and landscapes. Techno-scientific knowledge and practice have both enacted colonial divisions and been called on in post-colonial struggles. How them might we understand the work of scientific knowledge and practice in the kinds of hegemonies and struggles that shape our world today? We will explore this question by examining the way that technoscience is performed-by scientists, development workers, activists, government officials, and others. The class will pay particular attention to the located processes through which claims to the universal or global emerge. In addition by considering controversies over the environment, medicine, and indigenous knowledge, we will consider the effects of such claims.
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ANTHR 4458 : Women, Girls and Gender in Education
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7458, EDUC 4458, EDUC 7458, FGSS 4458, FGSS 7458 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar explores and compares the educational and schooling experiences of young women and girls through an array of ethnographic studies conducted in different regions of the world. Drawing on the fields of anthropology of education and feminist studies, we examine how girls and young women construct gender identities and ways of knowing through prisms of race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, language, nation and citizenship. Second, we inquire into how gendered notions of development and state sanctioned forms of structural and symbolic violence, impact young women's educational experiences and opportunities, and how they in turn respond. Lastly, we consider young women as learners who craft their own lives and literacies across borders and diverse spaces of home, school, community, and peer group.
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ARKEO 4460 : Heritage and its Entanglements: Representing, Collecting, and Preserving Cultural Identity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4460, ANTHR 7460, ARKEO 7460 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 4467 : Self and Subjectivity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7467 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course examines theories of subjectivity and self-formation from a comparative, ethnographic perspective. We begin by examining classic and contemporary phenomenological, psychodynamic, semiotic, structuralist, and post-structuralist theories of self and/or subject formation. Moving into the ethnographic literature, we assess the utility of these models for understanding the selves of others, particularly in critical juxtaposition to multiple and alternate theories of the self and/or person as understood in different cultures. By examining debates in the anthropology of emotion, cognition, healing, and mental health we bring into sharper focus the particular theoretical and empirical contributions (and/or limits and failures) of anthropologists towards developing a cross-cultural psychology.
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ANTHR 4478 : Taboo and Pollution
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course introduces students to the anthropology of taboo, dirt, cleanliness and purification. We'll examine the latest attempts to re-think and understand these classic topics through a range of cases, including sexual and blood taboos; ideas of racial or ethnic purity and purification; taboos governing food choices or religious practices; "primitive" fear and avoidance; as well as contemporary conceptions of filth and waste and their treatment in Western societies. We'll survey a wealth of writings on these topics, from anthropology (Douglas, Valeri, and others) as well as from psychology and literary studies (Freud, Kristeva, etc.).
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ARKEO 4517 : Saving Synagogues: Architecture, Historic Preservation and Communication
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7517, ARTH 4517, ARTH 6517, JWST 4517, JWST 7517, NES 4517, RELST 4517 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
For almost two thousand years the synagogue has been the focal point of Jewish life and identity. It has been the most prominent of Jewish buildings, for Jews and non-Jews. Thousands of synagogues have been built, but few synagogues are included in the traditional corpus of architectural history. Until recently, there was little systematic information on synagogue history, design and condition. 
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ANTHR 4520 : Society and Culture in the Nilgiris: Engaged Research in Rural South India
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 4550 : Archaeology of the Phoenicians
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4670, JWST 4550, NES 4550, NES 6550 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The Phoenicians have long been an enigma, a people defined by distant voices. Originating from present-day Lebanon, they were Semitic speakers, renowned seafarers and transmitters of an innovative alphabet that transformed how Mediterranean and Near Eastern folk wrote their languages. Having left us virtually no texts of their own, their history has resembled a patchwork of recollections from Old Testament and Hellenistic times. Recent archaeological discoveries, however, reveal patterns of trade, colonization and socioeconomic transformations that make the Phoenicians less enigmatic while raising new questions. Our class explores the third and second millennium Canaanite roots of the Phoenicians, as well as the Biblical and Greco-Roman perceptions of their early first millennium heyday. We will explore the Phoenician homeland and its colonies, and investigate their maritime economy, language, and religion through both archaeological and textual sources. Temporally the focus is on Phoenician rather than Carthaginian or Punic history, thus up to about 550 BCE. The class has a seminar format involving critical discussions and presentations of scholarly readings, and requires a research paper.
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ANTHR 4553 : Traditional China
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7553 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course develops an integrative approach to anthropological theory by means of an intensive examination of local life in China. Among the linked topics are family and kinship, local identity, ritual, cultural constructions of space and time, gender, ideology, and "modes of production of desire." Its primary objective is to illustrate the advantages of a broadly synthetic approach to socio-cultural anthropology by means of a close analytical examination of elements of local social life. In theoretical terms, the course advocates an accommodation among historical, psychoanalytic, and Marxian perspectives.
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ANTHR 4620 : Jewish Cities
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7620, JWST 4520, JWST 7520, NES 4520, NES 7520 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Jews and cities have been shaping each other for thousands of years. Studying those interactions involves urbanism, cosmopolitanism, transnationalism, and the idea of "the ghetto." This course ranges through time and space as we examine those fruitful and sometimes painful interactions by looking at labor, "ethnicity" and the built environment. Topics include contemporary Brooklyn, where Hasidic areas bump into hipster and black Caribbean communities; the place of Jews in medieval European cities; North African Jewish spaces between French colonizers and Muslim neighbors; the formation of the shtetl and the industrial town in Eastern Europe; memoirs of the golden age of Berlin Jewry; and the immigrant "ghetto" of the Lower East Side. We will focus closely on the involvement of urban Jewish communities in modernization and colonialism. Course materials include visual resources as well as historical, ethnographic and literary materials.
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ANTHR 4711 : Engaging NYC: Oral History and Ethnography
Crosslisted as: AMST 4410, AMST 6410, ANTHR 7711, ASRC 4310, ASRC 6310 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This engaged-learning course offers students a unique chance to gain valuable experience collaborating with a social justice organization in New York City. The class will impart proficiency in the research methods used by ethnographers and oral historians studying urban communities of color. Students will work with community partners to conceptualize real-world solutions to the problems community members are experiencing. We will address questions including: How can we use anthropology and oral history to influence public policies on education, housing, police practices and income inequality? How do differences in positionality  (i.e. race, class, gender, age) between the interviewer and the interviewee affect the production of ethnography and oral history?  The course will include travel to New York City and will require a significant commitment to engaged-learning. 
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ANTHR 4732 : The New Latin American State
Crosslisted as: LATA 4732 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Latin America today is the site of multiple utopian and practical experiments in governance. This seminar will problematize the simultaneous growth of neo-liberal, neo-socialist, and para-state formations. Using ethnography, documentary film, and theories of Latin American geopolitics, we will explore how dominant paradigms for political economy and fantasies of control emerge within contests over charisma, power, and legitimate violence. Why have indigenous and ethno-racialized social movements, or the return of the traditionally repressed, figured in projects of national or counter-national revitalization? What roles have self-defense organizations played in the re-definition of civil society? What does it mean to advocate for 'cultural diversity' or 'rights of nature'? Why have discourses of 'security' and 'human rights' come to be so charged in state bureaucracies and horizontalist political associations alike? This seminar will delve into a wide ranging array of texts that probe these and other questions about the new Latin American state.
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ANTHR 4745 : Colonial Intersections: Jews and Native Americans
Crosslisted as: AMST 4740, ANTHR 7745, JWST 4745, JWST 7745, NES 4745, NES 7745 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The colonial expansion of Christian Europe continues to leave its mark on the world of the twenty-first century. Two of the peoples caught up in that colonial project, in very different ways, are Jews and Native Americans. Indeed, these two groups were often conflated in the colonial imagination, with Native Americans imagined as the "lost tribes," and missionary rhetorics first aimed at Jews (and Muslims) being adapted for Native Americans. This course looks at the differing structural positions of Jews (the "other within" Christian Europe) and Native Americans (the "other without"). It also considers these peoples' varying responses to colonialism, and their relations with each other, to ask how we can compare forms of difference while retaining the richness of their distinctive formations.  
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ANTHR 4771 : Indigenous Art, Film, and New Media: Anti-Colonial Strategies
Crosslisted as: AMST 4771, AMST 6771, ANTHR 6771, ARTH 4771, ARTH 6771, COML 4771, COML 6771 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course examines Indigenous art, new media and film from three distinct interrelated perspectives of aesthetics/theory, technology and history/culture. The relationship between technology and tradition reevaluates established assumptions between representation, power and the gaze. Decolonizing methodologies will establish the translatability of Indigenous oral tradition to visual expression as a form of cultural agency. The use of media as a cultural and political intervention will be discussed through the work of Hopi filmmaker, Victor Masayesva, Inuit filmmaker, Zacharias Kunuk, the Kayapo Media Collective, Aboriginal artist, Tracy Moffat, new media artist; Mohawk, Skawanati, Maori photographer, John Miller and more. The construction, circulation, and reception of Indigenous visual culture will be discussed within a transnational, diasporic and global frame.
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ANTHR 4900 : Field Research Abroad
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Field research abroad as part of the Cornell-Nepal Studies Program, the Cornell-Honduras Program, or other departmentally approved programs. Topics are selected and project proposals prepared by student in consultation with faculty. Fieldwork typically involves extended research (usually 4-6 weeks) in a foreign setting with faculty supervision, culminating in a major paper or report.
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ANTHR 4900 : Field Research Abroad
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Field research abroad as part of the Cornell-Nepal Studies Program, the Cornell-Honduras Program, or other departmentally approved programs. Topics are selected and project proposals prepared by student in consultation with faculty. Fieldwork typically involves extended research (usually 4-6 weeks) in a foreign setting with faculty supervision, culminating in a major paper or report.
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ANTHR 4910 : Independent Study: Undergrad I
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 4910 : Independent Study: Undergrad I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 4920 : Independent Study: Undergrad II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 4920 : Independent Study: Undergrad II
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 4925 : Nilgiris Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor: Description
ARKEO 4981 : Honors Thesis Research
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent work under the close guidance of a faculty member.
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ARKEO 4981 : Honors Thesis Research
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent work under the close guidance of a faculty member.
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ARKEO 4982 : Honors Thesis Write-Up
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The student, under faculty direction, will prepare a senior thesis.
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ARKEO 4982 : Honors Thesis Write-Up
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The student, under faculty direction, will prepare a senior thesis.
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ANTHR 4983 : Honors Thesis Research
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Research work supervised by the thesis advisor, concentrating on determination of the major issues to be addressed by the thesis, preparation of literature reviews, analysis of data, and the like. The thesis advisor will assign the grade for this course.
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ANTHR 4991 : Honors Workshop I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Course will consist of several mandatory meetings of all thesis writers with the honors chair. These sessions will inform students about the standard thesis production timetable, format and content expectations, and deadlines; expose students to standard reference sources; and introduce students to each other's projects. The chair of the Honors Committee will assign the grade for this course.
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ANTHR 4992 : Honors Workshop II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Course will consist of weekly, seminar-style meetings of all thesis writers until mid-semester, under the direction of the honors chair. This second semester concentrates on preparation of a full draft of the thesis by mid-semester, with ample time left for revisions prior to submission. Group meetings will concentrate on collective reviewing of the work of other students, presentation of research, and the like.
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ARKEO 6000 : Graduate Independent Study in Archaeology
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Graduate students pursue advanced topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member(s).
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ANTHR 6010 : Proseminar: Social Organization
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Focuses on linkages between culture and social institutions, representations, and practices. The nature of these linkages is debated from strongly contesting points of view in social theory (structuralist, poststructuralist, utilitarian, hermeneutic, Marxist). Unlike debates in critical theory where the form of contestation has been mainly philosophical, in anthropology these issues have developed in ethnographic analyses. The course briefly surveys kinship theory and economic anthropology with a focus on implications for general issues in social theory. Discussion of attempts to develop dialectical syntheses around the motion of "practice" follows. The issues addressed in this section carry over into the next, colonialism and post-colonialism, in which poststructuralist readings of history are counterposed to Marxist ones. Finally, Lacanian and Marxist visions of ideology as they relate to anthropological theory and ethnographic analysis are examined with particular emphasis on the cultural and social production of persons.
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ANTHR 6015 : Teaching Anthropology/Teaching Culture
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course is a systematic engagement with issues in teaching anthropology to undergraduate students.  Where there is broad agreement in other social sciences about what should be taught in undergraduate courses, no such common understanding exists in the field of anthropology.  This course will explore the history of the teaching of anthropology, pedagogical issues unique to anthropology, and the pragmatics of teaching anthropology, especially the problems of teaching across cultures.
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ARKEO 6020 : Designing Archaeological Exhibits
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4020, LA 4050, LA 6050 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Students will learn method and theory on museum design and curation. The course also provides hands-on experience in designing and building exhibits for State Parks in the Finger Lakes. For the outreach component, students will work with staff from State Parks and Friends of the Parks.
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ANTHR 6020 : History of Anthropological Thought
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 6072 : Using Texts: Literature and Linguistic Anthropology
Crosslisted as: COML 6072 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
What does it mean to "use" a text or literary artifact? What happens to a novel when we examine it as "interactive text" produced in a shared "real time"? How does the use of a particular term help construct a context of publics and counterpublics? In this course we will study the linguistic anthropologist Michael Silverstein and his "pragmatic" linguistics in relation to free indirect discourse, Bakhtinian register, and Foucauldian author functions to consider how texts work in the world. Examining books from Manuel Puig, David Foster Wallace, Miguel Barnet, Andy Warhol, Lydia Davis and others that take the form of an interview, we will study the maneuvers of spoken conversation in print. Theorists include Jakobson, Bourdieu, V. Jackson, Latour, Banfield, Warner, Agha, and Lucey.
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ARKEO 6100 : The Craft of Archaeology
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course engages students in Archaeology and related fields in a semester-long discussion of the craft of archaeology with the faculty of the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies. Each week, a different faculty member will moderate a conversation on the professional skills vital to the modern practice of archaeological research and the tools key to professionalization. Seminar topics include developing a research project and working with museum collections to matters of pedagogy and career development.
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ARKEO 6210 : Historical Archaeology
Crosslisted as: AMST 3200, AMST 6210, ANTHR 3210, ANTHR 6210, ARKEO 3210 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course uses artifacts, spaces, and texts to examine the emergence of the "modern world" in the 500-plus years since Columbus.  This is a distinctive sub-field of archaeology, not least because modern attitudes toward economic systems, race relations, and gender roles emerged during this period.  We will read classic and contemporary texts to unearth the physical histories of contemporary ideas, including coverage of the archaeologies of capitalism, colonialism, gender relations, the African diaspora, ethnogenesis, and conflicts over the use of the past in the present.
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ARKEO 6211 : Ceramic Analysis for Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4211, ANTHR 6211, ARKEO 4211, NES 4544, NES 6544 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Ceramics are among the most ubiquitous materials in the archaeological record. From prehistory to the present, the manipulation of clay to form pottery and other synthetic objects has transformed domains of human experience from the quotidian to the consequential. This course addresses the theories and methods that equip archaeologists to make deductions about past societies on the basis of ceramic evidence. We will examine such topics as methods of organizing and classifying ceramic data, aspects of pottery production, pottery style, form, and function, techniques of instrumental analysis, and frameworks for the interpretation of pottery that allow archaeologists to arrive at some understanding of social, political, and economic lifeways. This course entails both seminar-based instruction and hands-on laboratory skills.
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ARKEO 6232 : Politics of the Past
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3232, ANTHR 6232, ARKEO 3232 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Archaeology has never operated in a vacuum. This course examines the political context of the study of the past, and the uses to which accounts of the past have been put in the present. Archaeology is often implicated in nationalist claims to territory, or claims of ethnic, racial, or religious superiority. Museum exhibits and other presentations to the public always have an agenda, consciously or otherwise. Archaeologists are increasingly required to interact with descendent communities, often in the context of postcolonial tensions. The antiquities trade and the protection of archaeological sites connects archaeologists to commercial and law enforcement sectors. We will also consider the internal politics of the practice of archaeology in various settings, including the implications of the funding sources that support archaeological work. This course is open to students of archaeology, socio-cultural anthropology, history, and other disciplines with an interest in the past.
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ANTHR 6235 : Bioarchaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3235, ARKEO 3235, ARKEO 6235 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.
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ARKEO 6267 : Contemporary Archaeological Theory
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6267 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course surveys recent developments and current debates in archaeological theory.  This includes the processual/postprocessual debate and contrasts between scientific and humanistic approaches more generally, as well as other approaches (Marxist, feminist, etc.)  We will examine epistemological issues (how do we know about the past?), and will explore how different theoretical approaches have shaped research on key archaeological topics.  We will also discuss ethical concerns and engagement with groups outside archaeology with interests in the past.
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ANTHR 6424 : Ethnoracial Identity in Anthropology, Language, and Law
Crosslisted as: AMST 6424, LAW 7231, LSP 6424 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the role that both law and language, as mutually constitutive mediating systems, occupy in constructing ethnoracial identity in the United States. We approach the law from a critical anthropological perspective, as a signifying and significant sociocultural system rather than as an abstract collection of rules, norms, and procedures, to examine how legal processes and discourses contribute to processes of cultural production and reproduction that contribute to the creation and maintenance of differential power relations. Course material draws on anthropological, linguistic, and critical race theory as well as ethnographic and legal material to guide and document our analyses.
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ANTHR 6432 : Hasidism: History, Community, Thought
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3432, JWST 3432, NES 3432, RELST 3432, RELST 6432 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The modern Jewish religious movement known as Hasidism began in Eastern Europe in the eighteenth century and thrives today.  We will approach Hasidism primarily through three avenues: recent critical social history; selections from Hasidic literature; and ethnographic accounts of Hasidic life today. By the end of the semester, students will be able to articulate some ways that Hasidism reflects both broader trends in European religious and moral thought of its time, and some ways that it represents distinctively Jewish developments. You will also gain a deeper appreciation of the various kinds of evidence and disciplinary approaches that need to be brought to bear on the attempt to articulate as broad, deep and varied a phenomenon as modern Hasidic Judaism. 
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ANTHR 6437 : Global Fantasies, Global Realities, Global Nightmares
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3437 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course offers a synthetic perspective on a spectrum of currently troubling phenomena -- the rise of authoritarian populism, growing inequality, racism, misogyny, nationalism, war. In particular, it links macro-scale and historical theories regarding global processes (e.g., "world systems," "globalization"), on the one hand, and the more intimate correlates of these macro forces shaping individual experience, on the other.  Drawing from anthropology as well as from cognate disciplines (political economy, history, and psychology), the course surveys and assesses both case studies of phenomena such as the self-delusion of the oppressed, the narcissism of dictators, and how the making and remaking of social identities relate to world economic cycles.  Course readings highlight how fantasy, imagination, hope and fear figure crucially in people's apprehensions of the contemporary world. 
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ANTHR 6440 : Research Design
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This seminar focuses on preparing a full-scale proposal for anthropological fieldwork for a dissertation. Topics include identifying appropriate funding sources; defining a researchable problem; selecting and justifying a particular fieldwork site; situating the ethnographic case within appropriate theoretical contexts; selecting and justifying appropriate research methodologies; developing a feasible timetable for field research; ethical considerations and human subjects protection procedures; and preparing appropriate budgets. This is a writing seminar, and students will complete a proposal suitable for submission to a major funding agency in the social sciences.
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ANTHR 6476 : Philosophy and Anthropology Together
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3476 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Philosophy remains anthropology's closest sister-discipline, or even its mother-discipline. Anthropology and philosophy are both dedicated to self-understanding: seeking to figure out what it is to be human, and what this means for us, raising questions such as how we can know the world, and ourselves, and how we should live;  the relationship between language, culture and the world; how we differ from other animals; and much more. Both disciplines have tried to generalize about humanity, but because of its acute awareness of cultural diversity, the younger field of anthropology diverged from philosophy. In this course we re-build a "philosophically aware anthropology," and take philosophy to task, by way of inspired readings carried out in a sympathetic yet critical spirit: We discuss a selection of important philosophers' and anthropologists' writings, and interdisciplinary dialogues.
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ARKEO 6662 : Sumerian Language and Culture II
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3662, NES 3662, NES 6662 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course continues to expose students to the earliest written language, Sumerian, begun in Sumerian Language and Culture I. It also tackles important historical and cultural questions of third millennium Mesopotamia, especially from 2500-2000 BCE.  Each week will explore the specifics of Sumerian grammar and phonology through increasingly complex Sumerian documents.  This semester focuses on Sumerian business, government, and economic documents as well as the language of Sumerian literature.  Extra readings and discussion will provide a sense of the deep roots of the Sumerian historical memory and the problems and research questions that interest Sumerologists, such as reconstructing trading networks, the working classes, ancient taxation, and scribal training.  Students will also be encouraged to explore the ways that the field of Sumerology has embraced digital technology.
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ANTHR 6738 : Networks in Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6738, CLASS 6738, NES 6638 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
It has become impossible to conceive of the world in which we live without networks. Our social circles have become so connected that only 'six degrees of separation' stand between you and any other person on earth. Computers and the internet enable instant communication. And both people and goods can travel across the globe in short time spans. Are networks a strictly modern phenomenon, or did they exist in the ancient world as well? Can thinking in terms of networks shed new light on the nature of the ancient world? Or does our modern reliance on relational thought cloud our view of the specificity of the past?
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ARKEO 6755 : Archaeological Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to the field of Dendrochronology and associated topics with an emphasis on their applications in the field of archaeology and related heritage-buildings fields. Course aimed at graduate level with a focus on critique of scholarship in the field and work on a project as part of the course.
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ANTHR 6771 : Indigenous Art, Film, and New Media: Anti-Colonial Strategies
Crosslisted as: AMST 4771, AMST 6771, ANTHR 4771, ARTH 4771, ARTH 6771, COML 4771, COML 6771 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course examines Indigenous art, new media and film from three distinct interrelated perspectives of aesthetics/theory, technology and history/culture. The relationship between technology and tradition reevaluates established assumptions between representation, power and the gaze. Decolonizing methodologies will establish the translatability of Indigenous oral tradition to visual expression as a form of cultural agency. The use of media as a cultural and political intervention will be discussed through the work of Hopi filmmaker, Victor Masayesva, Inuit filmmaker, Zacharias Kunuk, the Kayapo Media Collective, Aboriginal artist, Tracy Moffat, new media artist; Mohawk, Skawanati, Maori photographer, John Miller and more. The construction, circulation, and reception of Indigenous visual culture will be discussed within a transnational, diasporic and global frame.
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ANTHR 7235 : Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4235, ARKEO 4235, ARKEO 7235 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
"Res ipsa loquitur" -- the thing speaks for itself. This common expression captures a widespread belief about objects' roles in human lives, but "hearing" what objects have to say is actually a complex cultural process. An object rarely has a single meaning; they are read variously in different cultural settings, and even by different individuals within a cultural system. How does one know -- can one know -- the meanings of an object? How are objects strategically deployed in social interaction (particularly in cross-cultural interactions, where each side may have radically different understandings)? How does one even know what an object is? We will explore the history and variety of ways that material culture and its meanings have been studied, using archaeological and ethnographic examples.
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ARKEO 7246 : Human Osteology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4246, ANTHR 7246, ARKEO 4246 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This is an intensive laboratory course in the study of human skeletal remains. A detailed knowledge of skeletal anatomy is fundamental to forensic anthropology, bioarchaeology, and the medical sciences. This course teaches students how to identify all 206 bones and 32 teeth of the human skeleton, in both complete and fragmentary states. Students will also learn osteological methods for establishing a biological profile (age-at-death, sex, stature, and biological affinity) and documenting skeletal trauma and pathological lesions. Hands-on laboratory training will be supplemented by case studies that demonstrate the importance of human osteology for criminal investigations in the present and the study of health and violence in the past. The ethics of working with human remains are also discussed.
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ANTHR 7264 : Zooarchaeological Interpretation
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4264, ARKEO 4264, ARKEO 7264 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course is intended to follow on from Zooarchaeological Method in the fall; it is assumed that students have some familiarity with the nature of zooarchaeological material.  In this course, we will consider issues related to the interpretation of archaeological animal bones: quantification, seasonality, taphonomy, subsistence, the origins of hunting, animal domestication, modes of consumption, meat sharing, the use of secondary products (milk, wool, traction).
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ANTHR 7409 : Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4409 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course is an introduction to the practice and conceptual foundations of qualitative research methods in the social sciences. Students will learn different approaches with the opportunity to experience the practical dimensions of conducting a qualitative study, including research design, participant observation, interviewing, discourse analysis, and narrative inquiry. In the process, we will explore the principles, theories and epistemologies informing various paradigms in qualitative research. What does it mean to do interpretive research? What do feminist and critical ethnographies look like? What are critical race methodologies? What does it mean to think with performativity, power, deconstruction, desire or decoloniality? We will also examine dilemmas and issues concerning ethics, informed consent, researcher positionality and relationships, and writing and reporting.
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ANTHR 7425 : Hope and Futurity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4425 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
What is hope? How is hope produced and lost? How is hope distributed in society? What role does hope play in the production of knowledge, imagination and belief? In this course, we will investigate these questions through a close examination of a full range of anthropological, sociological, literary, philosophical and religious explorations into hope and futurity.
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ANTHR 7425 : Hope and Futurity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4425 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
What is hope? How is hope produced and lost? How is hope distributed in society? What role does hope play in the production of knowledge, imagination and belief? In this course, we will investigate these questions through a close examination of a full range of anthropological, sociological, literary, philosophical and religious explorations into hope and futurity.
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ANTHR 7435 : Postcolonial Science
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4435, BSOC 4351, STS 4351 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines science and technology in so-called "non-Western" countries as well as the ways that science and technology are shaping new "transnational" or "global" relations. We will explore the post-colonial as a dynamic space that both plays off of and refigures the complicated dynamics of colonialism. The postcolonial challenges the dichotomies through which colonial power moved: western/indigenous, white/black, modern/traditional, global/local, developed/underdeveloped, and science/non-science. At the same time, it confronts the ways in which colonial histories are still embodied in institutions, identities, environments, and landscapes. Techno-scientific knowledge and practice have both enacted colonial divisions and been called on in post-colonial struggles. How them might we understand the work of scientific knowledge and practice in the kinds of hegemonies and struggles that shape our world today? We will explore this question by examining the way that technoscience is performed-by scientists, development workers, activists, government officials, and others. The class will pay particular attention to the located processes through which claims to the universal or global emerge. In addition by considering controversies over the environment, medicine, and indigenous knowledge, we will consider the effects of such claims.
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ANTHR 7458 : Women, Girls and Gender in Education
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4458, EDUC 4458, EDUC 7458, FGSS 4458, FGSS 7458 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar explores and compares the educational and schooling experiences of young women and girls through an array of ethnographic studies conducted in different regions of the world. Drawing on the fields of anthropology of education and feminist studies, we examine how girls and young women construct gender identities and ways of knowing through prisms of race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, language, nation and citizenship. Second, we inquire into how gendered notions of development and state sanctioned forms of structural and symbolic violence, impact young women's educational experiences and opportunities, and how they in turn respond. Lastly, we consider young women as learners who craft their own lives and literacies across borders and diverse spaces of home, school, community, and peer group.
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ARKEO 7460 : Heritage and its Entanglements: Representing, Collecting, and Preserving Cultural Identity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4460, ANTHR 7460, ARKEO 4460 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 7467 : Self and Subjectivity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4467 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course examines theories of subjectivity and self-formation from a comparative, ethnographic perspective. We begin by examining classic and contemporary phenomenological, psychodynamic, semiotic, structuralist, and post-structuralist theories of self and/or subject formation. Moving into the ethnographic literature, we assess the utility of these models for understanding the selves of others, particularly in critical juxtaposition to multiple and alternate theories of the self and/or person as understood in different cultures. By examining debates in the anthropology of emotion, cognition, healing, and mental health we bring into sharper focus the particular theoretical and empirical contributions (and/or limits and failures) of anthropologists towards developing a cross-cultural psychology.
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ARKEO 7517 : Saving Synagogues: Architecture, Historic Preservation and Communication
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4517, ARTH 4517, ARTH 6517, JWST 4517, JWST 7517, NES 4517, RELST 4517 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
For almost two thousand years the synagogue has been the focal point of Jewish life and identity. It has been the most prominent of Jewish buildings, for Jews and non-Jews. Thousands of synagogues have been built, but few synagogues are included in the traditional corpus of architectural history. Until recently, there was little systematic information on synagogue history, design and condition. 
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ANTHR 7520 : Southeast Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7520 : Southeast Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7530 : South Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7530 : South Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7540 : Problems in Himalayan Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7550 : East Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7550 : East Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7553 : Traditional China
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4553 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course develops an integrative approach to anthropological theory by means of an intensive examination of local life in China. Among the linked topics are family and kinship, local identity, ritual, cultural constructions of space and time, gender, ideology, and "modes of production of desire." Its primary objective is to illustrate the advantages of a broadly synthetic approach to socio-cultural anthropology by means of a close analytical examination of elements of local social life. In theoretical terms, the course advocates an accommodation among historical, psychoanalytic, and Marxian perspectives.
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ANTHR 7620 : Jewish Cities
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4620, JWST 4520, JWST 7520, NES 4520, NES 7520 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Jews and cities have been shaping each other for thousands of years. Studying those interactions involves urbanism, cosmopolitanism, transnationalism, and the idea of "the ghetto." This course ranges through time and space as we examine those fruitful and sometimes painful interactions by looking at labor, "ethnicity" and the built environment. Topics include contemporary Brooklyn, where Hasidic areas bump into hipster and black Caribbean communities; the place of Jews in medieval European cities; North African Jewish spaces between French colonizers and Muslim neighbors; the formation of the shtetl and the industrial town in Eastern Europe; memoirs of the golden age of Berlin Jewry; and the immigrant "ghetto" of the Lower East Side. We will focus closely on the involvement of urban Jewish communities in modernization and colonialism. Course materials include visual resources as well as historical, ethnographic and literary materials.
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ARKEO 7710 : Humans and the Ancient Mediterranean Environment
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3710, CLASS 3710, CLASS 7710, NES 3610, NES 7710 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The Eastern Mediterranean is an ecologically diverse and varied landscape with a rich cultural heritage for studying long-term human-environmental interactions.  In this course we will explore how human activities such as mining, logging, water management, agriculture, and animal husbandry in antiquity impacted the area's environment, as well as how past pollution, disease, and sanitation affected human health.  We will investigate different environmental case studies spanning the last 10,000 years in the East Mediterranean, and their relationship to the area's modern environmental issues.  Particular emphasis will be made on examining how paleoecological, geomorphological, archaeological, and textual evidence may be used together to reconstruct past human-environmental interactions.  Students will also have the opportunity to explore their own topics of interest in Mediterranean environmental history.
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ANTHR 7711 : Engaging NYC: Oral History and Ethnography
Crosslisted as: AMST 4410, AMST 6410, ANTHR 4711, ASRC 4310, ASRC 6310 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This engaged-learning course offers students a unique chance to gain valuable experience collaborating with a social justice organization in New York City. The class will impart proficiency in the research methods used by ethnographers and oral historians studying urban communities of color. Students will work with community partners to conceptualize real-world solutions to the problems community members are experiencing. We will address questions including: How can we use anthropology and oral history to influence public policies on education, housing, police practices and income inequality? How do differences in positionality  (i.e. race, class, gender, age) between the interviewer and the interviewee affect the production of ethnography and oral history?  The course will include travel to New York City and will require a significant commitment to engaged-learning. 
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ARKEO 7712 : Archaeological Perspectives on the Rural Landscape
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3712, CLASS 3712, CLASS 7712 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This class overviews perspectives relevant to an archaeological understanding of ancient and pre-modern rural landscapes. During this course the students will engage with (a) textual evidence that describes agricultural methods as well as social relations surrounding peasants and farmers in the classical world, (b) anthropological studies exploring the urban/rural dynamics, (c) sociological studies ranging from Wolf's seminal Peasants to more recent ethnographic studies focusing on the Mediterranean, (d) archaeological methods implemented in the reconstruction of past environment and landscapes (palaeobotany, Geographic Information Systems).
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ARKEO 7743 : Archaeology of the Hellenistic Mediterranean
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7743, NES 7743 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The conquests and death of Alexander served as catalysts for major cultural transformation. Throughout the Mediterranean and beyond, Greco-Macedonian dynasties came to rule over foreign populations, establishing elements of Greek culture in places as diverse as Egypt, the Near East, Central Asia, and northwestern India. The resulting cultural interactions led not only to the creation of new, hybrid practices, but also new definitions of "Hellenicity." This seminar will provide an in-depth exploration of the cultural and historical developments of the Hellenistic period, with a particular emphasis on settlement archaeology and material culture. Chronologically, we will cover the period from Alexander's death in 323 BCE to the Battle of Actium in 31 BCE, when Octavian defeated Cleopatra VII to conquer the last remaining Hellenistic kingdom. We will examine the interactions between Greek and local cultures throughout the Hellenistic Mediterranean, considering material culture and iconography from both elite and popular contexts. We will also examine a range of different Hellenistic settlements, including the capital cities Alexandria and Pergamon; the important trading port of Delos; the well-preserved city of Priene; the Thessalian town of New Halos; the remote Bactrian city of Ai Khanum, in what is now Afghanistan; and the Egyptian city of Thebes, a site of frequent indigenous resistance to Greco-Macedonian rule.
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ANTHR 7745 : Colonial Intersections: Jews and Native Americans
Crosslisted as: AMST 4740, ANTHR 4745, JWST 4745, JWST 7745, NES 4745, NES 7745 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The colonial expansion of Christian Europe continues to leave its mark on the world of the twenty-first century. Two of the peoples caught up in that colonial project, in very different ways, are Jews and Native Americans. Indeed, these two groups were often conflated in the colonial imagination, with Native Americans imagined as the "lost tribes," and missionary rhetorics first aimed at Jews (and Muslims) being adapted for Native Americans. This course looks at the differing structural positions of Jews (the "other within" Christian Europe) and Native Americans (the "other without"). It also considers these peoples' varying responses to colonialism, and their relations with each other, to ask how we can compare forms of difference while retaining the richness of their distinctive formations.  
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ANTHR 7910 : Independent Study: Grad I
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7910 : Independent Study: Grad I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7920 : Independent Study: Grad II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7920 : Independent Study: Grad II
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7930 : Independent Study: Grad III
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7930 : Independent Study: Grad III
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ARKEO 8901 : Master's Thesis
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Students, working individually with faculty member(s), prepare a master's thesis in archaeology.
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