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ANTHR 1101 : FWS: Culture, Society, and Power
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This First-Year Writing Seminar is devoted to the anthropological study of the human condition.  Anthropology  examines all aspects of human experience, from the evolution of the species to contemporary challenges of politics, environment, and society.  The discipline emphasizes empirically rich field research informed by sophisticated theoretical understandings of human social life and cultural production. The diversity of anthropology's interests provides a diverse array of stimulating opportunities to write critically about the human condition. Topics vary by semester.
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ANTHR 1190 : Humanity
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course examines the relation between humanity as a species, our group affiliations, and our individual selves. In an era of increasing division, what remains of our commitment to one another as members of a human community? As contemporary problems challenge us at a global scale, there is a pressing need to revisit the question of our shared human existence. We will touch on an array of human productions and activities, from literature and labor to ritual and religion, in order to assess our commitments to self, community, and species. Together we will seek answers to a single pressing question: what are the obligations of being human? This is not only a question of "who we are", but also where we are headed.
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ANTHR 1200 : Ancient Peoples and Places
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 1200 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
A broad introduction to archaeology-the study of material remains to answer questions about the human past. Case studies highlight the variability of ancient societies and illustrate the varied methods and interpretive frameworks archaeologists use to reconstruct them. This course can serve as a platform for both archaeology and anthropology undergraduate majors.
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ANTHR 1300 : Human Evolution: Genes, Behavior, and the Fossil Record
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The evolution of humankind is explored through the fossil record, studies of the biological differences among current human populations, and a comparison with our closest relatives, the primates. This course investigates the roots of human biology and behavior with an evolutionary framework.
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ANTHR 1400 : The Comparison of Cultures
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to cultural anthropology through ethnographies, or the descriptive accounts of anthropologists. Through readings and lectures, students acquaint themselves with a number of cultures from several parts of the world. The cultures range in form from those of small-scale tribal societies to those of state societies. Throughout the course, we attempt to make sense of exotic cultures in their own terms. Attention is focused on variation in cultural patterns as they are expressed in social, economic, and ritual practices. In this encounter, the principles of anthropology, as a comparative enterprise that poses distinct cultural systems in relief, will be developed. Fiction, films, and exercises supplement the formal anthropological materials.
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ANTHR 1520 : Tamil Conversation in Context
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 1700 : Indigenous North America
Crosslisted as: AIIS 1100, AMST 1600 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the diverse cultures, histories and contemporary situations of the Indigenous peoples of North America. Students will also be introduced to important themes in the post-1492 engagement between Indigenous and settler populations in North America and will consider the various and complex ways in which that history affected - and continues to affect - American Indian peoples and societies. Course materials draw on the humanities, social sciences, and expressive arts.
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ANTHR 1900 : Global Engagements: Living and Working in a Diverse World
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The path to global citizenship begins with a facility for navigating cultural difference. How might we engage with communities, whether here in Ithaca or across the globe, whose pasts and present understandings are fundamentally different than our own? This course is designed to help students bring global engaged learning into their Cornell education. It introduces skills that are vital for intercultural engagement, including participant-observation research, ethnographic writing, and the habits of critical reflexivity. Students will complete projects with service learning placements in the Ithaca community. They will also begin an ePortfolio as they explore their identity and engage with the international community on campus.
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ANTHR 2021 : Viruses- Humans-Viral Politics (Social History and Cultural Politics of HIV & AIDS)
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2841, FGSS 2841, LGBT 2841, STS 2841 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course explores what has been termed "the modern plague."  It investigates the social history, cultural politics, biological processes, and global impacts of the retrovirus, HIV, and the disease syndrome, AIDS. It engages material from multiple fields: life sciences, social sciences, & humanities as well as media reports, government documents, activist art, and community-based documentaries. It explores various meanings and life-experiences of HIV & AIDS; examines conflicting understandings of health, disease, the body; investigates political struggles over scientific research, biomedical & public health interventions, and cultural representations; and queries how HIV vulnerability is shaped by systems of power and inequality. As well, we come to learn about the practices, the politics, and the ethics of life and care that arise in "the age of epidemic."
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ANTHR 2165 : They Were What They Ate: Food in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2165 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
"Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are," wrote renowned gastronome Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1825. Since then, it has become axiomatic within anthropology that social relationships are constructed through food-related practices and embodied in food, from the most basic tasks of acquiring food resources to the social and political contexts of the consumption of food and drink. In this course, we will consider the theoretical and methodological approaches that archaeologists use to study food and eating in ancient societies from a global anthropological perspective. Topics to be addressed include transitions to agriculture; ritual foodways; feasting and politics; gender and identity; colonialism; and food scarcity. Readings will include a range of Old and New World case studies.
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ANTHR 2201 : Early Agriculture
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2201 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Throughout most of the human career, people survived by hunting and gathering wild foods. The advent of food production is one of the most profound changes in (pre)history. This course examines the current evidence for the appearance and spread of agriculture (plant and animal domestication) around the world. We will consider definitions of agriculture and domestication, the conditions under which it arises, the consequences for those who adopt it, and why it has spread over most of the world.
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ANTHR 2235 : Archaeology of North American Indians
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2350, AMST 2350, ARKEO 2235 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course surveys archaeology's contributions to the study of American Indian cultural diversity and change in North America north of Mexico. Lectures and readings will examine topics ranging from the debate over when the continent was first inhabited to present-day conflicts between Native Americans and archaeologists over excavation and the interpretation of the past. We will review important archaeological sites such as Chaco Canyon, Cahokia, Lamoka Lake, and the Little Bighorn battlefield. A principal focus will be on major transformations in lifeways such as the adoption of agriculture, the development of political-economic hierarchies, and the disruptions that accompanied the arrival of Europeans to the continent.
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ANTHR 2245 : Health and Disease in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2245 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The history of humankind is also a history of health and disease; the rise of agricultural societies, ancient cities, and colonial empires had wide-ranging effects on diet and nutrition, the spread of infectious diseases, and occurrence of other health conditions. This history has also been shaped by complex interactions between environment, technology, and society. Using archaeological, environmental, textual, and skeletal evidence, we will survey major epidemiological transitions from the Paleolithic to the age of European conquest. We will also examine diverse cultural experiences of health, illness, and the body. How do medical practices from "pre-modern" socieites, such as the medieval Islamic world and the Inca Empire, challenge dominant narratives of scientific development? The implications of past health patterns for modern-day communities will also be explored.
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ANTHR 2310 : The Natural History of Chimpanzees and the Origins of Politics
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will examine the natural history of wild chimpanzees with an eye toward better understanding the changes that would have been necessary in human evolutionary history to promote the emergence of human culture and political life. After an overview of early research and preliminary attempts to apply our knowledge of chimpanzee life to social and political theory, the class will focus on our now extensive knowledge of chimpanzees derived from many ongoing, long-term field studies. Topics of particular interest include socialization, alliance formation and cooperation, aggression within and between the sexes, reconciliation, the maintenance of traditions, tool use, nutritional ecology and social organization, territorial behavior, and the importance of kin networks. The question of whether apes should have rights will also be explored.
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ANTHR 2400 : Cultural Diversity and Contemporary Issues
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course will introduce students to the meaning and significance of forms of cultural diversity for the understanding of contemporary issues. Drawing from films, videos, and selected readings, students will be confronted with different representational forms that portray cultures in various parts of the world, and they will be asked to examine critically their own prejudices as they influence the perception and evaluation of cultural differences. We shall approach cultures holistically, assuming the inseparability of economies, kinship, religion, and politics, as well as interconnections and dependencies between world areas (e.g., Africa, Latin America, the West). Among the issues considered: "political correctness" and truth; nativism and ecological diversity; race, ethnicity, and sexuality; sin, religion, and war; global process and cultural integrity.
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ANTHR 2410 : South Asian Diaspora
Crosslisted as: AAS 2100 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This interdisciplinary course (with an emphasis in anthropology) will introduce students to the multiple routes/roots, lived experiences, and imagined worlds of South Asians who have traveled to various lands at different historical moments spanning Fiji, South Africa, Mauritius, Britain, Malaysia, United States, Trinidad, and even within South Asia itself such as the Tamil-speaking population of Sri Lanka. The course will begin with the labor migrations of the 1830s and continue up to the present period. The primary exercise will be to compare and contrast the varied expressions of the South Asian Diaspora globally in order to critically evaluate this transnational identity. Thus, we will ask what, if any, are the ties that bind a fifth-generation Indo-Trinidadian whose ancestor came to the New World as an indentured laborer or "coolie" in the mid-19th century to labor in the cane fields, to a Pakistani medical doctor who migrated to the United States in the late 1980s. If Diaspora violates a sense of identity based on territorial integrity, then could "culture" serve as the basis for a shared identity?
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ANTHR 2415 : Anthropology of Iran
Crosslisted as: NES 2515, RELST 2515 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 2420 : Nature/Culture: Ethnographic Approaches to Human-Environment Relations
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2420 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
One of the most pressing questions of our time is how we should understand the relationship between nature (or "the environment") and culture (or society) - and/or whether these should be viewed as separate domains at all.  How one answers this question has important implications for how we go about thinking and acting in such diverse social arenas as environmental politics, development, and indigenous-state relations.  This course serves as an introduction to the various ways anthropologists and other scholars have conceptualized the relationship between humans and the environment and considers the material and political consequences that flow from these conceptualizations.
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ANTHR 2421 : Sex and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Crosslisted as: FGSS 2421, LGBT 2421 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the anthropology of sex, sexuality and gender, this course uses case studies from around the world to explore how the worlds of the sexes become gendered.  In ethnographic, ethnohistorical and contemporary globalizing contexts, we will look at: intersexuality & 'supernumerary' genders; physical & cultural reproduction; sexuality; and sex- & gender-based violence & power. We will use lectures, films, discussion sections and short field-based exercises.
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ANTHR 2430 : The Rise and Fall of Civilization
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2430 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The emergence of what has come to be called "civilization" marks a profound transformation in human culture, society, politics, economy, and psychology. The first civlizations have been variously described as the point of origin for artistic achievement and the genesis of social struggle, a victory over the state of nature and the source of human neurosis, the genealogical root of social inequality and the foundation for the rule of law. In this course we will examine the rise and fall of ancient "civilizations" at the same time as we interrogate the rise and fall of the concept of civilization itself in modern historical thought. Our primary focus will be a comparative archaeological examination of five pivotal case studies of early civilization: Mesopotamia (Sumer), Egypt, China, the Indus Valley, and the Maya lowlands. Alongside our explorations of these early civilizations, we will undertake a critical examination of current key issues in political anthropology, including the nature of kingship, the origins of cities, and the role of coercion in the formation of early polities. The course will examine the spread of "civilization", including the development of "secondary states", early empires, and the first world systems. We will conclude the class wth an examination of the concept of civilization itself, its historical roots and its current prominence in geopolitical thinking and policy making. The goal of the class is to provide students with an understanding of the nature of the world's first civilizations and the potency of their contemporary legacy.
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ANTHR 2468 : Medicine, Culture, and Society
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2468, FGSS 2468, STS 2468 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Medicine has become the language and practice through which we address a broad range of both individual and societal complaints. Interest in this "medicalization of life" may be one of the reasons that medical anthropology is currently the fastest-growing subfield in anthropology. This course encourages students to examine concepts of disease, suffering, health, and well-being in their immediate experience and beyond. In the process, students will gain a working knowledge of ecological, critical, phenomenological, and applied approaches used by medical anthropologists. We will investigate what is involved in becoming a doctor, the sociality of medicines, controversies over new medical technologies, and the politics of medical knowledge. The universality of biomedicine (or hospital medicine) will not be taken for granted, but rather we will examine the plurality generated by the various political, economic, social, and ethical demands under which biomedicine has developed in different places and at different times. In addition, biomedical healing and expertise will be viewed in relation to other kinds of healing and expertise. Our readings will address medicine in North America as well as other parts of the world. In class, our discussions will return regularly to consider the broad diversity of kinds of medicine throughout the world, as well as the specific historical and local contexts of biomedicine.
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ANTHR 2721 : Anthropological Representation: Ethnographies of Latino Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 2721, LSP 2721 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Representation is basic to anthropology. In the process of translating societies and cultures, anthropologists produce authoritative accounts about other people, their lives, and their communities. We will here examine, from a critical perspective, the production of representations on Latino culture[s] in anthropological texts. Issues to be explored include the relation between the ethnographer and the people s/he is studying, the contexts in which ethnographic texts are produced, the ways these texts may contribute to the position that different cultural groups have within the United States, and the implications emanating from these processes.
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ANTHR 2750 : Human Biology and Evolution
Crosslisted as: NS 2750 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Examines the theories and mechanisms of modern evolutionary biology as they apply to present-day humans and their hominid ancestors. Lectures and discussions of molecular and paleontological evidence of human evolution, the causes and consequences of contemporary human biological diversity, and biological and behavioral modes of human adaptation to past and present natural and cultural environments.
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ANTHR 3000 : Introduction to Anthropological Theory
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar course is designed to give anthropology majors an introduction to classical and contemporary social and anthropological theory and to help prepare them for upper-level seminars in anthropology. The seminar format emphasizes close reading and active discussion of key texts and theorists. The reading list will vary from year to year but will include consideration of influential texts and debates in 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century anthropological theory especially as they have sought to offer conceptual and analytical tools for making sense of human social experience and cultural capacities.
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ANTHR 3020 : Representing Brooklyn: Race, Place and Popular Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 3020, ASRC 3020 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Hip Hop/Hipster/Immigrant/Brownstone Brooklyn. This course borrows from hip hop's notion of "representing" to explore popular and cultural understandings of race and place in Brooklyn as depicted in print, music, film, and online. While today Brooklyn is New York City's hippest borough and the site of swift gentrification, booming real estate, and the ever-escalating displacement of immigrant and Black communities, in the 1980s and 1990s it was a hotbed of hip hop music, making the borough synonymous with Black cultural production. The course examines Black cultural production as it relates to representations of Brooklyn and deconstructs images and discourses that marginalize the borough's Black residents. Spanning the period from 1945 to the present day, the commodification of hip hop in the 1980s-1990s, and close readings of films including Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing," to reflect on how Black popular culture engages with Brooklyn's diverse communities. While materials are interdisciplinary in approach, our investigation is informed by anthropological, historical, and literary texts covering topics including immigration, youth culture, transnationalism, gentrification, authenticity, and classed, gendered and racialized inequality.
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ANTHR 3061 : Computing Cultures
Crosslisted as: COMM 3560, INFO 3561, STS 3561, VISST 3560 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Computers are powerful tools for working, playing, thinking, and living. Laptops, PDAs, webcams, cell phones, and iPods are not just devices, they also provide narratives, metaphors, and ways of seeing the world. This course critically examines how computing technology and society shape each other and how this plays out in our everyday lives. Identifies how computers, networks, and information technologies reproduce, reinforce, and rework existing cultural trends, norms, and values. Looks at the values embodied in the cultures of computing and considers alternative ways to imagine, build, and work with information technologies.
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ANTHR 3110 : Documentary Production Fundamentals
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6110, PMA 3510, PMA 6510 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course introduces students to documentary film production and story development. Through lectures, screenings, workshops, and technical labs, students will develop single-camera digital video production and editing skills. Weekly camera and editing exercises and one-on-one sessions with the instructor will enhance students' documentary filmmaking techniques. Additionally, students will gain an understanding of nonfiction film theory from the perspective of production and learn to critically engage and comment on each other's work. Discussions of debates around ethnographic representation and filmmaking ethics will help students to solve practical storytelling dilemmas. Over the course of the semester, students conduct pre-production research and have the opportunity to develop a film proposal and make a short film.
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ANTHR 3235 : Bioarchaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6235, ARKEO 3235, ARKEO 6235 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.  
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ANTHR 3405 : Multicultural Issues in Education
Crosslisted as: AMST 3405, EDUC 3405, LSP 3405 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course explores research on race, ethnicity and language in American education. It examines historical and current patterns of school achievement for minoritized youths. It also examines the cultural and social premises undergirding educational practices in diverse communities and schools. Policies, programs and pedagogy, including multicultural and bilingual education, are explored.
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ANTHR 3416 : The Barbarians
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6416, ASIAN 3332, ASIAN 6632 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The idea of the barbarians is as old as civilization itself. But what is a barbarian, and what is the role that barbarians play, as the savage enemies of civilization? In this course we will address such questions by looking at how different civilizations have imagined their barbarians, ranging from their key role in Greek drama, and as infidels in religious conceptions, to Chinese walls, and American savagery. We will examine both historical examples, and the barbarians of today -- the terrorists and insurgents so often framed as dark and primitive, in contrast with ourselves. Through readings and visual materials, we will seek to discover what these barbarians have in common. We will look comparatively for the underlying patterns of history that the barbarians are drafted from, to draw a new picture of the barbarians. At the same time, we will arrive at a new understanding of civilization as such, as well as of the general nature of human inequality, and how it is justified.   
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ANTHR 3703 : Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective
Crosslisted as: AAS 3030, AMST 3703, ANTHR 6703 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The common perception of ethnicity is that it is a "natural" and an inevitable consequence of cultural difference. "Asians" overseas, in particular, have won repute as a people who cling tenaciously to their culture and refuse to assimilate into their host societies and cultures. But, who are the "Asians?" On what basis can we label "Asians" an ethnic group? Although there is a significant Asian presence in the Caribbean, the category "Asian" itself does not exist in the Caribbean. What does this say about the nature of categories that label and demarcate groups of people on the basis of alleged cultural and phenotypical characteristics? This course will examine the dynamics behind group identity, namely ethnicity, by comparing and contrasting the multicultural experience of Asian populations in the Caribbean and the United States. Ethnographic case studies will focus on the East Indian and Chinese experiences in the Caribbean and the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipino, and Indian experiences in the United States.
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ANTHR 3901 : Going Global: Preparing for Engaged Learning
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
So you're enrolled in an upcoming study abroad program! Now what? How can you make the most of your experience? This half-semester course is designed to prepare students departing for any study abroad or domestic engaged learning programs. This course provides the opportunity to refine the skills necessary for cross-cultural encounters, including participant-observation research, ethnographic writing, and the habits of critical reflexivity. Students will research the culture and history of their destination and develop an ePortfolio to capture their experiences. They will also consider how to succeed in a foreign academic environment by engaging with the international community on campus.
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ANTHR 3902 : Coming Home: Making the Most of Engaged Experiences
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
How has your study abroad experience shaped you and your perspective on the world? What does it mean to be a global citizen? This half-semester course is designed for students returning from study abroad or other engaged learning programs. Students will reflect on topics such as identity, difference, and navigating cross-cultural encounters by writing narratives based on their experience and revising their ePortfolio. In doing so, they will grapple with "culture shock" and share moments of personal growth. They will also have the opportunity to contribute to the international community on campus.
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ANTHR 4025 : Deranged Authority: The Force of Culture in Climate Change
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7025, SHUM 4625, SHUM 6625 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
How does climate denialism persist in the face of mounting evidence that global warming is real? Conversely, how do environmentalists come to believe specific actions are necessary to save the world? How can climate justice efforts include local forms of knowledge and expertise? As humans struggle to conceive of new ways to live—and create change—in a time of "derangement," this seminar explores how forms of environmental in/action become authoritative in different social contexts. Here classical and critical theories of authority illuminate how environmental knowledge attains power in some settings but not others; additionally, ethnographies of ecoauthority reveal forms of resiliency that diverge from conventional models of climate remediation. Participants will write short discussion papers, co-lead one class meeting, and submit a final essay.
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ANTHR 4029 : On Political Authority and the Power to Expose
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7029, SHUM 4629, SHUM 6629 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on the "exterior" as a political problem in critical theory, architectural theory, and cultural anthropology. The texts we will examine and elaborate on a political distinction between a human "interior" of "culture" or "reason" and a non-human "exterior" made of "natural" processes that are indifferent to human life. We will examine theoretical critiques of the old political notion that the authority of rulers should be like that of architects: leaders are recognized by their capacity to build interior spaces that nourish human modes of living. We will consider a range of cases in which political projects designed to build all-encompassing interiors have exposed humans and non-humans alike to the possibility of outright destruction. In some cases, authorities are recognized as such due to their perceived capacity to expose themselves and their followers to the possibility of annihilation.
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ANTHR 4041 : What is (an) Epidemic? (Infectious Diseases in Historical, Social, and Political Perspective)
Crosslisted as: BSOC 4841, FGSS 4841, STS 4841 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The term "epidemic" travels widely and wildly in contemporary worlds.  But, what, when and where is "the epidemic"? How and why does epidemic unfold? This senior seminar offers an interdisciplinary exploration of infectious diseases.  Our investigations take us from medieval Europe's "Black Plague," to Tuberculosis in early twentieth century United States and its global resurgence at the turn of the twenty-first, to Ebola and its ongoing, periodic outbreaks today. We consider the consequences epidemics have for how we live and imagine shared ecological futures.  Examining work from the life sciences, social sciences, and arts & humanities, we explore the ways in which life and death, disease and survivability, health and thriving are shaped by infectious microbes, embodied eco-social forces, and contingent regimes of knowledge-power. 
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ANTHR 4101 : The Entangled Lives of Humans and Animals
Crosslisted as: BSOC 4101, STS 4101 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
One animal behaviorist speculates that big brains develop when species are social; that is, when they must read cues from members of their group to understand when to approach, when to flee, when to fight, when to care. This course looks not only at animals in their social lives, but also at animals in their lives with us. We ask questions about how species become entangled and what that means for both parties, about the social lives of animals independently and with humans, about the survival of human and animal species, and about what it means to use animals for science, food, and profit. The course draws on readings from Anthropology, Science & Technology Studies, and animal trainers and behaviorists.
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ANTHR 4102 : Women in Hip Hop
Crosslisted as: AMST 4402, ASRC 4402, FGSS 4402, LGBT 4402 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 4130 : Recognition, Abjection, and State Ideology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7130, SHUM 4630, SHUM 6630 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
"Recognition, Abjection, and State Ideology" introduces seminal theories of modern state ideology with reference to ethnographic texts that focus both on the formation of national identity and social exclusion. While the course examines relations between the economy and the effectiveness of state rhetoric, it also addresses how state ideologies today require the expulsion of certain groups from general society, and how these groups maintain their own socialities.
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ANTHR 4176 : Humanitarian Affects
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7176, FGSS 4876, FGSS 6876, GOVT 4745, GOVT 6745 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 4216 : Maya History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6256, ARKEO 4216, ARKEO 6256, LATA 4215, LATA 6256 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is an exploration of Maya understandings of their own history as it is reflected in ancient texts. We will begin by looking at episodes in Colonial and recent history to illustrate some of the ways Maya thinking about history may differ from more familiar genres. We will then review basic aspects of precolumbian Maya writing, but we will focus mainly on analyzing texts from one or more Classic period Maya cities.
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ANTHR 4227 : Embodiment of Inequality: A Bioarchaeological Perspective
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7227, ARKEO 4227, ARKEO 7227 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Critical approaches to embodiment compel bioarchaeologists to consider how social norms and institutional inequalities are enacted and materialized through the body. This course contributes a deep archaeological perspective on the lived experience of inequality and the historically contingent nature of sexuality, gender, and violence. Drawing upon the study of human skeletons, social theory, and a rich comparative literature in cultural anthropology, we will "put flesh on the bones" and explore topics such as body modification and mutilation; masculinity and performative violence; sexuality and 'third gender'; and sickness and suffering in past societies. We will not only consider privilege and marginalization in lived experience, but also in death, examining how unequal social relationships are reproduced when the dead body is colonized as an object of study.
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ANTHR 4235 : Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7235, ARKEO 4235, ARKEO 7235 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
"Res ipsa loquitur" -- the thing speaks for itself. This common expression captures a widespread belief about objects' roles in human lives, but "hearing" what objects have to say is actually a complex cultural process. An object rarely has a single meaning; they are read variously in different cultural settings, and even by different individuals within a cultural system. How does one know -- can one know -- the meanings of an object? How are objects strategically deployed in social interaction (particularly in cross-cultural interactions, where each side may have radically different understandings)? How does one even know what an object is? We will explore the history and variety of ways that material culture and its meanings have been studied, using archaeological and ethnographic examples.
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ANTHR 4263 : Zooarchaeological Method
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7263, ARKEO 4263, ARKEO 7263 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This is a hands-on laboratory course in zooarchaeological method: the study of animal bones from archaeological sites. It is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in identification of body part and taxon, aging and sexing, pathologies, taphonomy, and human modification. We will deal only with mammals larger than squirrels. While we will work on animal bones from prehistoric Europe, most of these skills are easily transferable to the fauna of other areas, especially North America. This is an intensive course that emphasizes laboratory skills in a realistic setting. You will analyze an assemblage of actual archaeological bones. It is highly recommended that students also take the course in Zooarchaeological Interpretation (ANTHR 4264/ARKEO 4264) offered in the spring.
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ANTHR 4264 : Zooarchaeological Interpretation
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7264, ARKEO 4264, ARKEO 7264 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course follows from last semester's Zooarchaeological Method. We will shift our emphasis here from basic skills to interpretation, although you will continue to work with archaeological bones. We will begin by examining topics surrounding the basic interpretation of raw faunal data: sampling, quantification, taphonomy, seasonality. We will then explore how to use faunal data to reconstruct subsistence patterns, social structure, and human/animal relations.
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ANTHR 4268 : Aztecs and Their Empire: Myth, History, and Politics
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7268, ARKEO 4268, ARKEO 7268, LATA 4268, LATA 7268 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Examines the structure and history of the largest polity in ancient Mexico, the "empire" of the Aztecs, using descriptions left by Spanish invaders, accounts written by Aztecs under Colonial rule, and archaeological evidence. Explores Aztec visions of the past, emphasizing the roles of myth, religion, and identity in Aztec statecraft and the construction of history.
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ANTHR 4272 : Archaeology of Colonialism and Cultural Entanglement
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4720, AIIS 7720, AMST 4272, AMST 6272, ANTHR 7272, ARKEO 4272, ARKEO 7272 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar uses archaeology to examine engagements between settlers and indigenous peoples throughout world history. Archaeology provides a perspective on settler-indigenous encounters that both supplements and challenges conventional models.  We will assess the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of cultural engagement, examine methodologies, and explore a series of archaeological case studies, using examples from both the ancient world and the European expansion over the past 600 years. The seminar provides a comparative perspective on indigenous-colonial relationships, in particular exploring the hard-fought spaces of relative autonomy created and sustained by indigenous peoples. 
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ANTHR 4390 : Primate Conservation: Cross-cultural Perspectives on Wilderness Preservation and Animal-Human
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Primate species are going extinct.  The goal of this seminar is to examine a variety of issues related to conservation in general, and to the conservation of primates in particular.  For example, what is "wilderness"?  Is there cross-cultural variation in how wild nature is valued?  Can ethics be extended beyond humans?  Is consumerism the real culprit in the global ecological crisis?  How do human and nonhuman primate ecologies intersect, and how can understanding these intersections be integrated into conservation efforts?  How, in practice, does one develop and implement a real-world conservation action plan?  Discussions will focus both on theoretical issues and on the analysis of a new generation of real-world conservation initiatives that depend on interdisciplinary collaboration.
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ANTHR 4403 : Ethnographic Field Methods
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6403 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will provide students with practical understanding about what anthropologists actually do in the field. We will examine problems that emerge in conducting fieldwork that raise ethical, methodological, theoretical, and practical issues in the observation, participation in, recording, and representation of culture(s). Students will be expected to develop a semester-long, local research project that will allow them to experience fieldwork situations.
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ANTHR 4409 : Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7409 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course is an introduction to the practice and conceptual foundations of qualitative research methods in the social sciences. Students will learn different approaches with the opportunity to experience the practical dimensions of conducting a qualitative study, including research design, participant observation, interviewing, discourse analysis, and narrative inquiry. In the process, we will explore the principles, theories and epistemologies informing various paradigms in qualitative research. What does it mean to do interpretive research? What do feminist and critical ethnographies look like? What are critical race methodologies? What does it mean to think with performativity, power, deconstruction, desire or decoloniality? We will also examine dilemmas and issues concerning ethics, informed consent, researcher positionality and relationships, and writing and reporting.
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ANTHR 4419 : Anthropology of Corporations
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7419 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course develops an anthropological approach to corporations with a focus on large, profit-oriented, publicly-traded corporations. To denaturalize the corporation, we will consider competing cultural logics internal to corporations as well as the contingent historical processes and debates that shaped the corporate form over the past two centuries. The course will examine processes through which various social groups have sought to alter and restrain corporations as well as reciprocal corporate attempts to reshape the social environment in which they operate.
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ANTHR 4425 : Hope and Futurity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7425 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
What is hope? How is hope produced and lost? How is hope distributed in society? What role does hope play in the production of knowledge, imagination and belief? In this course, we will investigate these questions through a close examination of a full range of anthropological, sociological, literary, philosophical and religious explorations into hope and futurity.
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ANTHR 4451 : Time and Temporality
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7451 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The concept of historical progress of mankind (sic) cannot be sundered from the concept of its progression through a homogeneous, empty time. - Walter Benjamin
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ANTHR 4460 : Heritage and its Entanglements: Representing, Collecting, and Preserving Cultural Identity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7460, ARKEO 4460, ARKEO 7460 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
An exploration of the ways that cultural heritage is embodied in things, particularly archaeological landscapes, sites, and artifacts.   Identifying stakeholders in relation to collecting and controlling these things and representing heritage is a key focus:  what voices should states and other political entities have?  local residents? descendants?  How should descendants be identified?  Other key topics include looting and the market in smuggled antiquities; repatriation; the ethics of studying and publishing looted objects; community engagement; forces that destroy heritage and strategies for preserving it; re-invented and imagined heritage.  These issues will be examined using the collections of the Johnson Museum of Art and through case studies, including Colonial Williamsburg, African Burial Ground, Harriet Tubman House, the ancient Maya, and archaeology in the Third Reich.
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ANTHR 4473 : Messiah and Modernity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7473, GERST 4473, GERST 7473, JWST 4473, JWST 7473, NES 4473, NES 7473 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course combines Jewish religious history with studies in the philosophy of modernity, focusing on changing conceptions of time and history.  We will interrogate possible or implicit connections between traditional Jewish notions of Messianic redemption on one hand, and post-Enlightenment conceptions of revolution and progress on the other (always bearing in mind that the dominant Christian ideology in the West also has Messianic content).  Some readings will provide historical background on Jewish Messianism.  We will explore aspects of the intellectual dialogue between Walter Benjamin, a leading European thinker on literature and the philosophy of history in the first decades of the twentieth century, and his lifelong friend Gershom Scholem, founder of the scholarly study of Jewish mysticism.  We will continue by considering how post-World War II thinkers, especially on the Continent, have responded to the critique of modern ideologies of progress inaugurated by Benjamin and his friends in the so-called "Frankfurt School."
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ANTHR 4479 : Ethnicity and Identity Politics: An Anthropological Perspective
Crosslisted as: AAS 4790, AAS 7479, ANTHR 7479 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The most baffling aspect of ethnicity is that while ethnic sentiments and movements gain ground rapidly within the international arena, the claim that ethnicity does not exist in any objective sense is also receiving increasing credence within the academic community. How can something thought "not to exist" have such profound consequences in the real world? In lay understandings, ethnicity is believed to be a "natural" disposition of humanity. If so, why does ethnicity mean different "things" in different places? Anthropology has much to contribute to a greater understanding of this perplexing phenomenon. After all, the defining criterion for ethnic groups is that of cultural distinctiveness. Through ethnographic case studies, this course will examine some of the key anthropological approaches to ethnicity. We will explore the relationship of ethnicity to culture, ethnicity to nation, and ethnicity to state to better understand the role ethnicity plays in the identity politics of today.
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ANTHR 4490 : The Sexual Politics of Religion
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7490, FGSS 4290, FGSS 6290, LGBT 4290, LGBT 6290, RELST 4240, RELST 6290 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Drawing on feminist and queer theory and ethnographic studies of ritual and devotional practices around the world this course will consider the relationships among the social organization of sexuality, embodiment of gender, nationalisms and everyday forms of worship. In addition to investigating the norms of family, gender, sex and the nation embedded in dominant institutionalized forms of religion we will study such phenomena as ritual transgenderism, neo tantrism, theogamy (marriage to a deity), priestly celibacy and temple prostitution. The disciplinary and normalizing effects of religion as well as the possibilities of religiosity as a mode of social dissent will be explored through different ethnographic and fictional accounts of ritual and faithful practices in Africa, Asia and the Americas.
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ANTHR 4520 : Society and Culture in the Nilgiris: Engaged Research in Rural South India
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 4733 : The Lower East Side: Jews and the Immigrant City
Crosslisted as: AMST 4533, JWST 4533, JWST 7533, NES 4533, NES 7533 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
American Jews have frequently been touted as a "model minority." This course will take a more critical look at the historical interactions between Jewish immigration, United States industrialization, and processes of social and geographical mobility—all through the prism of New York's Lower East Side, first home for over 750,000 Jewish immigrants from Central and Eastern Europe, the Ottoman Empire and elsewhere between the mid-19th century and the 1920s.  We will compare the Jewish experience to that of other immigrants/migrants by considering social institutions as well as material and other cultural practices. We will examine interactions with the built environment —most especially the tenement—in Lower East Side culture. Special attention will be paid to immigrant labor movement politics including strikes, splits, and gender in the garment trade. From the perspective of the present, the course will examine how commemoration, heritage tourism and the selling of [immigrant] history intersect with gentrifying real estate in an "iconic" New York City neighborhood. Projects using the ILR's archives on the Triangle Fire and other topics are explicitly encouraged. This course counts as an out of college elective for B. Arch and M. Arch students.
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ANTHR 4910 : Independent Study: Undergrad I
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 4920 : Independent Study: Undergrad II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 4925 : Nilgiris Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 4991 : Honors Workshop I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Course will consist of several mandatory meetings of all thesis writers with the honors chair. These sessions will inform students about the standard thesis production timetable, format and content expectations, and deadlines; expose students to standard reference sources; and introduce students to each other's projects. The chair of the Honors Committee will assign the grade for this course.
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ANTHR 4992 : Honors Workshop II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Course will consist of weekly, seminar-style meetings of all thesis writers until mid-semester, under the direction of the honors chair. This second semester concentrates on preparation of a full draft of the thesis by mid-semester, with ample time left for revisions prior to submission. Group meetings will concentrate on collective reviewing of the work of other students, presentation of research, and the like.
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ANTHR 6015 : Teaching Anthropology/Teaching Culture
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is a systematic engagement with issues in teaching anthropology to undergraduate students.  Where there is broad agreement in other social sciences about what should be taught in undergraduate courses, no such common understanding exists in the field of anthropology.  This course will explore the history of the teaching of anthropology, pedagogical issues unique to anthropology, and the pragmatics of teaching anthropology, especially the problems of teaching across cultures.
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ANTHR 6020 : History of Anthropological Thought
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the history and development of anthropology as a discipline with emphasis on British social anthropology and American cultural anthropology.  The course will trace major schools of thought -- Evolutionism, Funtionalism, and Structuralism-- leading to the post-structural "critique of culture." The latter part of the course will examine a range of  debates around anthropology's method and claims to theory beginning with the reflexive turn.  Specifically, this part of the course will address how the recognition by anthropologists of the operations of power both in the "world out there" and "within anthropology" has led to diverse methodologies and theories that define contemporary anthropology.
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ANTHR 6025 : Proseminar in Anthropology
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course explores advanced topics in anthropological theory and practice. It builds on the history of the discipline that students will have examined in the preceding course ANTHR 6020, and seeks to immerse students in major contemporary theoretical developments and debates and the discipline's most pressing concerns. Coursework will proceed mainly by way of reading, writing, and discussion.  
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ANTHR 6110 : Documentary Prod Fundamentals
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3110, PMA 3510, PMA 6510 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course introduces students to documentary film production and story development. Through lectures, screenings, workshops, and technical labs, students will develop single-camera digital video production and editing skills. Weekly camera and editing exercises and one-on-one sessions with the instructor will enhance students' documentary filmmaking techniques. Additionally, students will gain an understanding of nonfiction film theory from the perspective of production and learn to critically engage and comment on each other's work. Discussions of debates around ethnographic representation and filmmaking ethics will help students to solve practical storytelling dilemmas. Over the course of the semester, students conduct pre-production research and have the opportunity to develop a film proposal and make a short film.
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ANTHR 6235 : Bioarchaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3235, ARKEO 3235, ARKEO 6235 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.
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ANTHR 6256 : Maya History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4216, ARKEO 4216, ARKEO 6256, LATA 4215, LATA 6256 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is an exploration of Maya understandings of their own history as it is reflected in ancient texts. We will begin by looking at episodes in Colonial and recent history to illustrate some of the ways Maya thinking about history may differ from more familiar genres. We will then review basic aspects of precolumbian Maya writing, but we will focus mainly on analyzing texts from one or more Classic period Maya cities.
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ANTHR 6267 : Contemporary Archaeological Theory
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6267 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course surveys recent developments and current debates in archaeological theory.  This includes the processual/postprocessual debate and contrasts between scientific and humanistic approaches more generally, as well as other approaches (Marxist, feminist, etc.)  We will examine epistemological issues (how do we know about the past?), and will explore how different theoretical approaches have shaped research on key archaeological topics.  We will also discuss ethical concerns and engagement with groups outside archaeology with interests in the past.
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ANTHR 6402 : Material Theory II: Assemblage & Object
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 6402 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores recent efforts to theorize the materiality of human social, political, and cultural life. We will draw broadly from contemporary works in archaeology, socio-cultural anthropology, art, social thought, media studies, and literary theory to piece together a sense of the conceptual possibilities afforded by analytical engagement with the world of things. We will take the historical dynamics of things as our central concern, navigating between classic and contemporary debates over the social location, physical constitution, and agency of object worlds. Along the way we will take in contemporary arguments for objects as constitutive elements of mind, affect, and order. The goal of the course is to juxtapose the experience, perception, and imagination of objects in order to address critical gaps in our understanding of social life past, present, and future. As the second course in a sequence focused on material theory, this seminar is part of a wider effort to train students to be astute analysts of the material world.
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ANTHR 6403 : Ethnographic Field Methods
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4403 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will provide students with practical understanding about what anthropologists actually do in the field. We will examine problems that emerge in conducting fieldwork that raise ethical, methodological, theoretical, and practical issues in the observation, participation in, recording, and representation of culture(s). Students will be expected to develop a semester-long, local research project that will allow them to experience fieldwork situations.
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ANTHR 6416 : The Barbarians
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3416, ASIAN 3332, ASIAN 6632 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The idea of the barbarians is as old as civilization itself. But what is a barbarian, and what is the role that barbarians play, as the savage enemies of civilization? In this course we will address such questions by looking at how different civilizations have imagined their barbarians, ranging from their key role in Greek drama, and as infidels in religious conceptions, to Chinese walls, and American savagery. We will examine both historical examples, and the barbarians of today -- the terrorists and insurgents so often framed as dark and primitive, in contrast with ourselves. Through readings and visual materials, we will seek to discover what these barbarians have in common. We will look comparatively for the underlying patterns of history that the barbarians are drafted from, to draw a new picture of the barbarians. At the same time, we will arrive at a new understanding of civilization as such, as well as of the general nature of human inequality, and how it is justified.   
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ANTHR 6440 : Proposal Development
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This seminar focuses on preparing a full-scale proposal for anthropological fieldwork for a dissertation. Topics include identifying appropriate funding sources; defining a researchable problem; selecting and justifying a particular fieldwork site; situating the ethnographic case within appropriate theoretical contexts; selecting and justifying appropriate research methodologies; developing a feasible timetable for field research; ethical considerations and human subjects protection procedures; and preparing appropriate budgets. This is a writing seminar, and students will complete a proposal suitable for submission to a major funding agency in the social sciences.
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ANTHR 6475 : Culture, Language, and Thought
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The relationship among culture, language, and thought has been a core concern in many disciplines. Anthropology among them offers a particularly productive perspective for considering this concern. Language and culture are commonly defined as processes that are public and shared yet they also operate within and upon subliminal experiential realms. In this course we shall examine how anthropologists have explored this relationship, which is engendered in the interaction between culture and language as parallel mediating devices for the constitution, interpretation, and expression of human thought and experience.
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ANTHR 6703 : Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective
Crosslisted as: AAS 3030, AMST 3703, ANTHR 3703 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The common perception of ethnicity is that it is a "natural" and an inevitable consequence of cultural difference. "Asians" overseas, in particular, have won repute as a people who cling tenaciously to their culture and refuse to assimilate into their host societies and cultures. But, who are the "Asians?" On what basis can we label "Asians" an ethnic group? Although there is a significant Asian presence in the Caribbean, the category "Asian" itself does not exist in the Caribbean. What does this say about the nature of categories that label and demarcate groups of people on the basis of alleged cultural and phenotypical characteristics? This course will examine the dynamics behind group identity, namely ethnicity, by comparing and contrasting the multicultural experience of Asian populations in the Caribbean and the United States. Ethnographic case studies will focus on the East Indian and Chinese experiences in the Caribbean and the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipino, and Indian experiences in the United States.
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ANTHR 7010 : Engaged Anthropology
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course asks how anthropologists articulate the relevance of our work in theoretical and political terms by staging an encounter between three disparate strands of scholarship: anthropology of the contemporary, engaged/public anthropology, and anthropology of everyday violence and ordinary affects. Designed to bring together pre-fieldwork and post-fieldwork graduate students, this seminar functions as a laboratory for expanding existing conversations and exploring further articulations of engaged anthropology of the contemporary. Participants will reflect on how their political commitments, ethnographic and other sensibilities, and theoretical perspectives inform each other, and will invigorate their research design, writing, and analytical frameworks in light of these reflections and engagement with course texts. The course is open to students from across the disciplines.
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ANTHR 7025 : Deranged Authority: The Force of Culture in Climate Change
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4025, SHUM 4625, SHUM 6625 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 7029 : On Political Authority and the Power to Expose
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4029, SHUM 4629, SHUM 6629 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 7120 : Anthropology and Ontology
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
In recent years, it has become fashionable in anthropology to write about ontology, so much so that some have begun referring to an "ontological turn" in the discipline. Although many see interest in questions of ontology as something new, in fact such questions have important antecedents both in anthropology and related disciplines. Accordingly, we will read classical as well as more contemporary works that engage with issues now considered "ontological." The idea is neither to advocate for nor "debunk" the notion of ontology, but rather to engage with it in its proper historical and theoretical context. We will reflect deeply and critically on what – if anything – "ontology" enables us to think/analyze that older notions like "worldview" and "culture" do not.
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ANTHR 7130 : Recognition, Abjection, and State Ideology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4130, SHUM 4630, SHUM 6630 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 7176 : Humanitarian Affects
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4176, FGSS 4876, FGSS 6876, GOVT 4745, GOVT 6745 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 7227 : Embodiment of Inequality: A Bioarchaeological Perspective
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4227, ARKEO 4227, ARKEO 7227 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Critical approaches to embodiment compel bioarchaeologists to consider how social norms and institutional inequalities are enacted and materialized through the body. This course contributes a deep archaeological perspective on the lived experience of inequality and the historically contingent nature of sexuality, gender, and violence. Drawing upon the study of human skeletons, social theory, and a rich comparative literature in cultural anthropology, we will "put flesh on the bones" and explore topics such as body modification and mutilation; masculinity and performative violence; sexuality and 'third gender'; and sickness and suffering in past societies. We will not only consider privilege and marginalization in lived experience, but also in death, examining how unequal social relationships are reproduced when the dead body is colonized as an object of study.
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ANTHR 7235 : Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4235, ARKEO 4235, ARKEO 7235 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
"Res ipsa loquitur" -- the thing speaks for itself. This common expression captures a widespread belief about objects' roles in human lives, but "hearing" what objects have to say is actually a complex cultural process. An object rarely has a single meaning; they are read variously in different cultural settings, and even by different individuals within a cultural system. How does one know -- can one know -- the meanings of an object? How are objects strategically deployed in social interaction (particularly in cross-cultural interactions, where each side may have radically different understandings)? How does one even know what an object is? We will explore the history and variety of ways that material culture and its meanings have been studied, using archaeological and ethnographic examples.
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ANTHR 7263 : Zooarchaeological Method
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4263, ARKEO 4263, ARKEO 7263 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This is a hands-on laboratory course in zooarchaeological method: the study of animal bones from archaeological sites.  It is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in identification of body part and taxon, aging and sexing, pathologies, taphonomy, and human modification.  The course will deal only with mammals larger than squirrels.  While students will work on animal bones from prehistoric Europe, most of these skills are easily transferable to the fauna of other areas, especially North America.  This is an intensive course that emphasizes laboratory skills in a realistic setting.  Students will analyze an assemblage of actual archaeological bones.  It is highly recommended that students also take the course in Zooarchaeological Interpretation (ANTHR 7264/ARKEO 7264) offered in the spring.
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ANTHR 7264 : Zooarchaeological Interpretation
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4264, ARKEO 4264, ARKEO 7264 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course is intended to follow on from Zooarchaeological Method in the fall; it is assumed that students have some familiarity with the nature of zooarchaeological material.  In this course, we will consider issues related to the interpretation of archaeological animal bones: quantification, seasonality, taphonomy, subsistence, the origins of hunting, animal domestication, modes of consumption, meat sharing, the use of secondary products (milk, wool, traction).
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ANTHR 7268 : Aztecs and Their Empire: Myth, History, and Politics
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4268, ARKEO 4268, ARKEO 7268, LATA 4268, LATA 7268 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Examines the structure and history of the largest polity in ancient Mexico, the "empire" of the Aztecs, using descriptions left by Spanish invaders, accounts written by Aztecs under Colonial rule, and archaeological evidence. Explores Aztec visions of the past, emphasizing the roles of myth, religion, and identity in Aztec statecraft and the construction of history.
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ANTHR 7272 : Archaeology of Colonialism and Cultural Entanglement
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4720, AIIS 7720, AMST 4272, AMST 6272, ANTHR 4272, ARKEO 4272, ARKEO 7272 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar uses archaeology to examine engagements between settlers and indigenous peoples throughout world history. Archaeology provides a perspective on settler-indigenous encounters that both supplements and challenges conventional models.  We will assess the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of cultural engagement, examine methodologies, and explore a series of archaeological case studies, using examples from both the ancient world and the European expansion over the past 600 years. The seminar provides a comparative perspective on indigenous-colonial relationships, in particular exploring the hard-fought spaces of relative autonomy created and sustained by indigenous peoples. 
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ANTHR 7409 : Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4409 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course is an introduction to the practice and conceptual foundations of qualitative research methods in the social sciences. Students will learn different approaches with the opportunity to experience the practical dimensions of conducting a qualitative study, including research design, participant observation, interviewing, discourse analysis, and narrative inquiry. In the process, we will explore the principles, theories and epistemologies informing various paradigms in qualitative research. What does it mean to do interpretive research? What do feminist and critical ethnographies look like? What are critical race methodologies? What does it mean to think with performativity, power, deconstruction, desire or decoloniality? We will also examine dilemmas and issues concerning ethics, informed consent, researcher positionality and relationships, and writing and reporting.
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ANTHR 7419 : Anthropology of Corporations
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4419 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course develops an anthropological approach to corporations with a focus on large, profit-oriented, publicly-traded corporations. To denaturalize the corporation, we will consider competing cultural logics internal to corporations as well as the contingent historical processes and debates that shaped the corporate form over the past two centuries. The course will examine processes through which various social groups have sought to alter and restrain corporations as well as reciprocal corporate attempts to reshape the social environment in which they operate.
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ANTHR 7425 : Hope and Futurity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4425 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
What is hope? How is hope produced and lost? How is hope distributed in society? What role does hope play in the production of knowledge, imagination and belief? In this course, we will investigate these questions through a close examination of a full range of anthropological, sociological, literary, philosophical and religious explorations into hope and futurity.
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ANTHR 7451 : Time and Temporality
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4451 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The concept of historical progress of mankind (sic) cannot be sundered from the concept of its progression through a homogeneous, empty time. - Walter Benjamin
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ANTHR 7460 : Heritage and its Entanglements: Representing, Collecting, and Preserving Cultural Identity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4460, ARKEO 4460, ARKEO 7460 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
An exploration of the ways that cultural heritage is embodied in things, particularly archaeological landscapes, sites, and artifacts.   Identifying stakeholders in relation to collecting and controlling these things and representing heritage is a key focus:  what voices should states and other political entities have?  local residents? descendants?  How should descendants be identified?  Other key topics include looting and the market in smuggled antiquities; repatriation; the ethics of studying and publishing looted objects; community engagement; forces that destroy heritage and strategies for preserving it; re-invented and imagined heritage.  These issues will be examined using the collections of the Johnson Museum of Art and through case studies, including Colonial Williamsburg, African Burial Ground, Harriet Tubman House, the ancient Maya, and archaeology in the Third Reich.
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ANTHR 7473 : Messiah and Modernity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4473, GERST 4473, GERST 7473, JWST 4473, JWST 7473, NES 4473, NES 7473 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course combines Jewish religious history with studies in the philosophy of modernity, focusing on changing conceptions of time and history.  We will interrogate possible or implicit connections between traditional Jewish notions of Messianic redemption on one hand, and post-Enlightenment conceptions of revolution and progress on the other (always bearing in mind that the dominant Christian ideology in the West also has Messianic content).  Some readings will provide historical background on Jewish Messianism.  We will explore aspects of the intellectual dialogue between Walter Benjamin, a leading European thinker on literature and the philosophy of history in the first decades of the twentieth century, and his lifelong friend Gershom Scholem, founder of the scholarly study of Jewish mysticism.  We will continue by considering how post-World War II thinkers, especially on the Continent, have responded to the critique of modern ideologies of progress inaugurated by Benjamin and his friends in the so-called "Frankfurt School." 
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ANTHR 7479 : Ethnicity and Identity Politics: An Anthropological Perspective
Crosslisted as: AAS 4790, AAS 7479, ANTHR 4479 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The most baffling aspect of ethnicity is that while ethnic sentiments and movements gain ground rapidly within the international arena, the claim that ethnicity does not exist in any objective sense is also receiving increasing credence within the academic community. How can something thought "not to exist" have such profound consequences in the real world? In lay understandings, ethnicity is believed to be a "natural" disposition of humanity. If so, why does ethnicity mean different "things" in different places? Anthropology has much to contribute to a greater understanding of this perplexing phenomenon. After all, the defining criterion for ethnic groups is that of cultural distinctiveness. Through ethnographic case studies, this course will examine some of the key anthropological approaches to ethnicity. We will explore the relationship of ethnicity to culture, ethnicity to nation, and ethnicity to state to better understand the role ethnicity plays in the identity politics of today.
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ANTHR 7490 : The Sexual Politics of Religion
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4490, FGSS 4290, FGSS 6290, LGBT 4290, LGBT 6290, RELST 4240, RELST 6290 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Drawing on feminist and queer theory and ethnographic studies of ritual and devotional practices around the world this course will consider the relationships among the social organization of sexuality, embodiment of gender, nationalisms and everyday forms of worship. In addition to investigating the norms of family, gender, sex and the nation embedded in dominant institutionalized forms of religion we will study such phenomena as ritual transgenderism, neo tantrism, theogamy (marriage to a deity), priestly celibacy and temple prostitution. The disciplinary and normalizing effects of religion as well as the possibilities of religiosity as a mode of social dissent will be explored through different ethnographic and fictional accounts of ritual and faithful practices in Africa, Asia and the Americas.
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ANTHR 7520 : Southeast Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Independent reading course on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7520 : Southeast Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Independent reading course on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7530 : South Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7530 : South Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7540 : Problems in Himalayan Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 7550 : East Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7550 : East Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7637 : Shi'ism: Debates and Discourses
Crosslisted as: NES 4537, NES 6537, RELST 4537, RELST 6537 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ANTHR 7900 : Department of Anthropology Colloquium
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
A bi-weekly series of workshops and lectures on a range of themes in the discipline sponsored by the Department of Anthropology.  Presentations include lectures by invited speakers, debates featuring prominent anthropologists from across the globe, and works in progress presented by anthropology faculty and graduate students.
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ANTHR 7900 : Department of Anthropology Colloquium
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
A bi-weekly series of workshops and lectures on a range of themes in the discipline sponsored by the Department of Anthropology. Presentations include lectures by invited speakers, debates featuring prominent anthropologists from across the globe, and works in progress presented by anthropology faculty and graduate students.
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ANTHR 7910 : Independent Study: Grad I
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7920 : Independent Study: Grad II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7930 : Independent Study: Grad III
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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