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ANTHR 1101 : FWS: Culture, Society, and Power
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Eudes Lopes
Ting Hui Lau
Natalie Nesvaderani
Kurt Jordan
This First-Year Writing Seminar is devoted to the anthropological study of the human condition.  Anthropology  examines all aspects of human experience, from the evolution of the species to contemporary challenges of politics, environment, and society.  The discipline emphasizes empirically rich field research informed by sophisticated theoretical understandings of human social life and cultural production. The diversity of anthropology's interests provides a diverse array of stimulating opportunities to write critically about the human condition. Topics vary by semester.
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ANTHR 1190 : Humanity
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jonathan Boyarin
Adam Smith
This course examines the relation between humanity as a species, our group affiliations, and our individual selves. In an era of increasing division, what remains of our commitment to one another as members of a human community? As contemporary problems challenge us at a global scale, there is a pressing need to revisit the question of our shared human existence. We will touch on an array of human productions and activities, from literature and labor to ritual and religion, in order to assess our commitments to self, community, and species. Together we will seek answers to a single pressing question: what are the obligations of being human? This is not only a question of "who we are", but also where we are headed.
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ANTHR 1300 : Human Evolution: Genes, Behavior, and the Fossil Record
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Matthew Velasco
The evolution of humankind is explored through the fossil record, studies of the biological differences among current human populations, and a comparison with our closest relatives, the primates. This course investigates the roots of human biology and behavior with an evolutionary framework.
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ANTHR 1520 : Tamil Conversation in Context
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lucinda Ramberg
Andrew Willford
Description
ANTHR 2021 : Viruses- Humans-Viral Politics (Social History and Cultural Politics of HIV & AIDS)
Crosslisted as: AMST 2841, BSOC 2841, FGSS 2841, LGBT 2841, STS 2841 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Christopher Roebuck
This course explores what has been termed "the modern plague."  It investigates the social history, cultural politics, biological processes, and global impacts of the retrovirus, HIV, and the disease syndrome, AIDS. It engages material from multiple fields: life sciences, social sciences, & humanities as well as media reports, government documents, activist art, and community-based documentaries. It explores various meanings and life-experiences of HIV & AIDS; examines conflicting understandings of health, disease, the body; investigates political struggles over scientific research, biomedical & public health interventions, and cultural representations; and queries how HIV vulnerability is shaped by systems of power and inequality. As well, we come to learn about the practices, the politics, and the ethics of life and care that arise in "the age of epidemic."
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ANTHR 2045 : American Indian Music in Context
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Chad Uran
This course will introduce students to the politics, practices, aesthetics, and purposes of North American Indigenous music.  Students will learn about socio-historical contexts of colonization and sovereignty, and how they influence the production and reception of North American Indigenous musical expressions. Other topics of focus will include issues of representation, cultural property ownership, and ethical concerns. Our readings, as well as the music we listen to and see performed, will be organized according to overlapping themes and genres such as "welcoming, asking permission, and thanksgiving," or "revitalization and resistance," and more. Students will learn how music exists as a means to express cultural continuity, and is embedded in and reflective of myriad aspects of Native American social life.
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ANTHR 2165 : They Were What They Ate: Food in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2165 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Dana Bardolph
"Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are," wrote renowned gastronome Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1825. Since then, it has become axiomatic within anthropology that social relationships are constructed through food-related practices and embodied in food, from the most basic tasks of acquiring food resources to the social and political contexts of the consumption of food and drink. In this course, we will consider the theoretical and methodological approaches that archaeologists use to study food and eating in ancient societies from a global anthropological perspective. Topics to be addressed include transitions to agriculture; ritual foodways; feasting and politics; gender and identity; colonialism; and food scarcity. Readings will include a range of Old and New World case studies.
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ANTHR 2201 : Early Agriculture
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2201 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Nerissa Russell
Throughout most of the human career, people survived by hunting and gathering wild foods. The advent of food production is one of the most profound changes in (pre)history. This course examines the current evidence for the appearance and spread of agriculture (plant and animal domestication) around the world. We will consider definitions of agriculture and domestication, the conditions under which it arises, the consequences for those who adopt it, and why it has spread over most of the world.
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ANTHR 2400 : Cultural Diversity and Contemporary Issues
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Frederic Gleach
This course will introduce students to the meaning and significance of forms of cultural diversity for the understanding of contemporary issues. Drawing from films, videos, and selected readings, students will be confronted with different representational forms that portray cultures in various parts of the world, and they will be asked to examine critically their own prejudices as they influence the perception and evaluation of cultural differences. We shall approach cultures holistically, assuming the inseparability of economies, kinship, religion, and politics, as well as interconnections and dependencies between world areas (e.g., Africa, Latin America, the West). Among the issues considered: "political correctness" and truth; nativism and ecological diversity; race, ethnicity, and sexuality; sin, religion, and war; global process and cultural integrity.
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ANTHR 2468 : Medicine, Culture, and Society
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2468, FGSS 2468, STS 2468 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Saida Hodzic
Elif Sari
Medicine has become the language and practice through which we address a broad range of both individual and societal complaints. Interest in this "medicalization of life" may be one of the reasons that medical anthropology is currently the fastest-growing subfield in anthropology. This course encourages students to examine concepts of disease, suffering, health, and well-being in their immediate experience and beyond. In the process, students will gain a working knowledge of ecological, critical, phenomenological, and applied approaches used by medical anthropologists. We will investigate what is involved in becoming a doctor, the sociality of medicines, controversies over new medical technologies, and the politics of medical knowledge. The universality of biomedicine (or hospital medicine) will not be taken for granted, but rather we will examine the plurality generated by the various political, economic, social, and ethical demands under which biomedicine has developed in different places and at different times. In addition, biomedical healing and expertise will be viewed in relation to other kinds of healing and expertise. Our readings will address medicine in North America as well as other parts of the world. In class, our discussions will return regularly to consider the broad diversity of kinds of medicine throughout the world, as well as the specific historical and local contexts of biomedicine.
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ANTHR 3020 : Representing Brooklyn: Race, Place and Popular Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 3020, ASRC 3020 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Oneka LaBennett
Hip Hop/Hipster/Immigrant/Brownstone Brooklyn. This course borrows from hip hop's notion of "representing" to explore popular and cultural understandings of race and place in Brooklyn as depicted in print, music, film, and online. While today Brooklyn is New York City's hippest borough and the site of swift gentrification, booming real estate, and the ever-escalating displacement of immigrant and Black communities, in the 1980s and 1990s it was a hotbed of hip hop music, making the borough synonymous with Black cultural production. The course examines Black cultural production as it relates to representations of Brooklyn and deconstructs images and discourses that marginalize the borough's Black residents. Spanning the period from 1945 to the present day, the commodification of hip hop in the 1980s-1990s, and close readings of films including Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing," to reflect on how Black popular culture engages with Brooklyn's diverse communities. While materials are interdisciplinary in approach, our investigation is informed by anthropological, historical, and literary texts covering topics including immigration, youth culture, transnationalism, gentrification, authenticity, and classed, gendered and racialized inequality.
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ANTHR 3061 : Computing Cultures
Crosslisted as: COMM 3560, INFO 3561, STS 3561, VISST 3560 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Malte Ziewitz
Computers are powerful tools for working, playing, thinking, and living. Laptops, PDAs, webcams, cell phones, and iPods are not just devices, they also provide narratives, metaphors, and ways of seeing the world. This course critically examines how computing technology and society shape each other and how this plays out in our everyday lives. Identifies how computers, networks, and information technologies reproduce, reinforce, and rework existing cultural trends, norms, and values. Looks at the values embodied in the cultures of computing and considers alternative ways to imagine, build, and work with information technologies.
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ANTHR 3110 : Documentary Production Fundamentals
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6110, PMA 3510, PMA 6510 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Natasha Raheja
This course introduces students to documentary film production and story development. Through lectures, screenings, workshops, and technical labs, students will develop single-camera digital video production and editing skills. Weekly camera and editing exercises and one-on-one sessions with the instructor will enhance students' documentary filmmaking techniques. Additionally, students will gain an understanding of nonfiction film theory from the perspective of production and learn to critically engage and comment on each other's work. Discussions of debates around ethnographic representation and filmmaking ethics will help students to solve practical storytelling dilemmas. Over the course of the semester, students conduct pre-production research and have the opportunity to develop a film proposal and make a short film.
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ANTHR 3235 : Bioarchaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6235, ARKEO 3235, ARKEO 6235 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Matthew Velasco
Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.  
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ANTHR 3405 : Multicultural Issues in Education
Crosslisted as: AMST 3405, EDUC 3405, LSP 3405 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Sofia Villenas
This course explores research on race, ethnicity and language in American education. It examines historical and current patterns of school achievement for minoritized youths. It also examines the cultural and social premises undergirding educational practices in diverse communities and schools. Policies, programs and pedagogy, including multicultural and bilingual education, are explored.
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ANTHR 3416 : The Barbarians
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6416, ASIAN 3332, ASIAN 6632 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Magnus Fiskesjo
The idea of the barbarians is as old as civilization itself. But what is a barbarian, and what is the role that barbarians play, as the savage enemies of civilization? In this course we will address such questions by looking at how different civilizations have imagined their barbarians, ranging from their key role in Greek drama, and as infidels in religious conceptions, to Chinese walls, and American savagery. We will examine both historical examples, and the barbarians of today -- the terrorists and insurgents so often framed as dark and primitive, in contrast with ourselves. Through readings and visual materials, we will seek to discover what these barbarians have in common. We will look comparatively for the underlying patterns of history that the barbarians are drafted from, to draw a new picture of the barbarians. At the same time, we will arrive at a new understanding of civilization as such, as well as of the general nature of human inequality, and how it is justified.   
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ANTHR 3703 : Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective
Crosslisted as: AAS 3030, AMST 3703, ANTHR 6703 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Viranjini Munasinghe
The common perception of ethnicity is that it is a "natural" and an inevitable consequence of cultural difference. "Asians" overseas, in particular, have won repute as a people who cling tenaciously to their culture and refuse to assimilate into their host societies and cultures. But, who are the "Asians?" On what basis can we label "Asians" an ethnic group? Although there is a significant Asian presence in the Caribbean, the category "Asian" itself does not exist in the Caribbean. What does this say about the nature of categories that label and demarcate groups of people on the basis of alleged cultural and phenotypical characteristics? This course will examine the dynamics behind group identity, namely ethnicity, by comparing and contrasting the multicultural experience of Asian populations in the Caribbean and the United States. Ethnographic case studies will focus on the East Indian and Chinese experiences in the Caribbean and the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipino, and Indian experiences in the United States.
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ANTHR 4235 : Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7235, ARKEO 4235, ARKEO 7235 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Frederic Gleach
"Res ipsa loquitur" -- the thing speaks for itself. This common expression captures a widespread belief about objects' roles in human lives, but "hearing" what objects have to say is actually a complex cultural process. An object rarely has a single meaning; they are read variously in different cultural settings, and even by different individuals within a cultural system. How does one know -- can one know -- the meanings of an object? How are objects strategically deployed in social interaction (particularly in cross-cultural interactions, where each side may have radically different understandings)? How does one even know what an object is? We will explore the history and variety of ways that material culture and its meanings have been studied, using archaeological and ethnographic examples.
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ANTHR 4264 : Zooarchaeological Interpretation
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7264, ARKEO 4264, ARKEO 7264 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Nerissa Russell
This course follows from last semester's Zooarchaeological Method. We will shift our emphasis here from basic skills to interpretation, although you will continue to work with archaeological bones. We will begin by examining topics surrounding the basic interpretation of raw faunal data: sampling, quantification, taphonomy, seasonality. We will then explore how to use faunal data to reconstruct subsistence patterns, social structure, and human/animal relations.
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ANTHR 4268 : Aztecs and Their Empire: Myth, History, and Politics
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7268, ARKEO 4268, ARKEO 7268, LATA 4268, LATA 7268 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
John Henderson
Examines the structure and history of the largest polity in ancient Mexico, the "empire" of the Aztecs, using descriptions left by Spanish invaders, accounts written by Aztecs under Colonial rule, and archaeological evidence. Explores Aztec visions of the past, emphasizing the roles of myth, religion, and identity in Aztec statecraft and the construction of history.
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ANTHR 4409 : Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7409 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Sofia Villenas
This course is an introduction to the practice and conceptual foundations of qualitative research methods in the social sciences. Students will learn different approaches with the opportunity to experience the practical dimensions of conducting a qualitative study, including research design, participant observation, interviewing, discourse analysis, and narrative inquiry. In the process, we will explore the principles, theories and epistemologies informing various paradigms in qualitative research. What does it mean to do interpretive research? What do feminist and critical ethnographies look like? What are critical race methodologies? What does it mean to think with performativity, power, deconstruction, desire or decoloniality? We will also examine dilemmas and issues concerning ethics, informed consent, researcher positionality and relationships, and writing and reporting.
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ANTHR 4451 : Time and Temporality
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7451 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lucinda Ramberg
The concept of historical progress of mankind (sic) cannot be sundered from the concept of its progression through a homogeneous, empty time. - Walter Benjamin
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ANTHR 4460 : Heritage and its Entanglements: Representing, Collecting, and Preserving Cultural Identity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7460, ARKEO 4460, ARKEO 7460 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
John Henderson
An exploration of the ways that cultural heritage is embodied in things, particularly archaeological landscapes, sites, and artifacts.   Identifying stakeholders in relation to collecting and controlling these things and representing heritage is a key focus:  what voices should states and other political entities have?  local residents? descendants?  How should descendants be identified?  Other key topics include looting and the market in smuggled antiquities; repatriation; the ethics of studying and publishing looted objects; community engagement; forces that destroy heritage and strategies for preserving it; re-invented and imagined heritage.  These issues will be examined using the collections of the Johnson Museum of Art and through case studies, including Colonial Williamsburg, African Burial Ground, Harriet Tubman House, the ancient Maya, and archaeology in the Third Reich.
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ANTHR 4473 : Messiah and Modernity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7473, GERST 4473, GERST 7473, JWST 4473, JWST 7473, NES 4473, NES 7473 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jonathan Boyarin
This course combines Jewish religious history with studies in the philosophy of modernity, focusing on changing conceptions of time and history.  We will interrogate possible or implicit connections between traditional Jewish notions of Messianic redemption on one hand, and post-Enlightenment conceptions of revolution and progress on the other (always bearing in mind that the dominant Christian ideology in the West also has Messianic content).  Some readings will provide historical background on Jewish Messianism.  We will explore aspects of the intellectual dialogue between Walter Benjamin, a leading European thinker on literature and the philosophy of history in the first decades of the twentieth century, and his lifelong friend Gershom Scholem, founder of the scholarly study of Jewish mysticism.  We will continue by considering how post-World War II thinkers, especially on the Continent, have responded to the critique of modern ideologies of progress inaugurated by Benjamin and his friends in the so-called "Frankfurt School."
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ANTHR 4479 : Ethnicity and Identity Politics: An Anthropological Perspective
Crosslisted as: AAS 4790, AAS 7479, ANTHR 7479 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Viranjini Munasinghe
The most baffling aspect of ethnicity is that while ethnic sentiments and movements gain ground rapidly within the international arena, the claim that ethnicity does not exist in any objective sense is also receiving increasing credence within the academic community. How can something thought "not to exist" have such profound consequences in the real world? In lay understandings, ethnicity is believed to be a "natural" disposition of humanity. If so, why does ethnicity mean different "things" in different places? Anthropology has much to contribute to a greater understanding of this perplexing phenomenon. After all, the defining criterion for ethnic groups is that of cultural distinctiveness. Through ethnographic case studies, this course will examine some of the key anthropological approaches to ethnicity. We will explore the relationship of ethnicity to culture, ethnicity to nation, and ethnicity to state to better understand the role ethnicity plays in the identity politics of today.
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ANTHR 4520 : Society and Culture in the Nilgiris: Engaged Research in Rural South India
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lucinda Ramberg
Andrew Willford
Description
ANTHR 4733 : The Lower East Side: Jews and the Immigrant City
Crosslisted as: AMST 4533, ILRLR 4533, ILRLR 7533, JWST 4533, JWST 7533, NES 4533, NES 7533 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Elissa Sampson
American Jews have frequently been touted as a "model minority." This course will take a more critical look at the historical interactions between Jewish immigration, United States industrialization, and processes of social and geographical mobility—all through the prism of New York's Lower East Side, first home for over 750,000 Jewish immigrants from Central and Eastern Europe, the Ottoman Empire and elsewhere between the mid-19th century and the 1920s.  We will compare the Jewish experience to that of other immigrants/migrants by considering social institutions as well as material and other cultural practices. We will examine interactions with the built environment —most especially the tenement—in Lower East Side culture. Special attention will be paid to immigrant labor movement politics including strikes, splits, and gender in the garment trade. From the perspective of the present, the course will examine how commemoration, heritage tourism and the selling of [immigrant] history intersect with gentrifying real estate in an "iconic" New York City neighborhood. Projects using the ILR's archives on the Triangle Fire and other topics are explicitly encouraged. This course counts as an out of college elective for B. Arch and M. Arch students.
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ANTHR 4910 : Independent Study: Undergrad I
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Adam Arcadi
Billie Isbell
Jane Fajans
Magnus Fiskesjo
Frederic Gleach
John Henderson
David Holmberg
Kurt Jordan
Stacey Langwick
Kathryn March
Hirokazu Miyazaki
Viranjini Munasinghe
Annelise Riles
Nerissa Russell
P. Steven Sangren
Vilma Santiago-Irizarry
Matthew Velasco
Thomas Volman
Marina Welker
Andrew Willford
Paul Nadasdy
Sofia Villenas
Lucinda Ramberg
Saida Hodzic
Adam Smith
Jonathan Boyarin
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 4920 : Independent Study: Undergrad II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Adam Arcadi
Billie Isbell
Jane Fajans
Magnus Fiskesjo
Frederic Gleach
John Henderson
David Holmberg
Kurt Jordan
Stacey Langwick
Kathryn March
Hirokazu Miyazaki
Viranjini Munasinghe
Annelise Riles
Nerissa Russell
P. Steven Sangren
Vilma Santiago-Irizarry
Matthew Velasco
Thomas Volman
Marina Welker
Andrew Willford
Paul Nadasdy
Sofia Villenas
Lucinda Ramberg
Saida Hodzic
Adam Smith
Jonathan Boyarin
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 4925 : Nilgiris Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Andrew Willford
Description
ANTHR 4984 : Honors Thesis Write-Up
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Adam Arcadi
Billie Isbell
Jane Fajans
Magnus Fiskesjo
Frederic Gleach
John Henderson
David Holmberg
Kurt Jordan
Stacey Langwick
Kathryn March
Hirokazu Miyazaki
Viranjini Munasinghe
Annelise Riles
Nerissa Russell
P. Steven Sangren
Vilma Santiago-Irizarry
Matthew Velasco
Thomas Volman
Marina Welker
Andrew Willford
Paul Nadasdy
Sofia Villenas
Lucinda Ramberg
Saida Hodzic
Adam Smith
Jonathan Boyarin
Final write-up of the thesis under the direct supervision of the thesis advisor, who will assign the grade for this course.
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ANTHR 4992 : Honors Workshop II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Saida Hodzic
Course will consist of weekly, seminar-style meetings of all thesis writers until mid-semester, under the direction of the honors chair. This second semester concentrates on preparation of a full draft of the thesis by mid-semester, with ample time left for revisions prior to submission. Group meetings will concentrate on collective reviewing of the work of other students, presentation of research, and the like.
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ANTHR 6025 : Proseminar in Anthropology
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Magnus Fiskesjo
This course explores advanced topics in anthropological theory and practice. It builds on the history of the discipline that students will have examined in the preceding course ANTHR 6020, and seeks to immerse students in major contemporary theoretical developments and debates and the discipline's most pressing concerns. Coursework will proceed mainly by way of reading, writing, and discussion.  
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ANTHR 6110 : Documentary Production Fundamentals
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3110, PMA 3510, PMA 6510 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Natasha Raheja
This course introduces students to documentary film production and story development. Through lectures, screenings, workshops, and technical labs, students will develop single-camera digital video production and editing skills. Weekly camera and editing exercises and one-on-one sessions with the instructor will enhance students' documentary filmmaking techniques. Additionally, students will gain an understanding of nonfiction film theory from the perspective of production and learn to critically engage and comment on each other's work. Discussions of debates around ethnographic representation and filmmaking ethics will help students to solve practical storytelling dilemmas. Over the course of the semester, students conduct pre-production research and have the opportunity to develop a film proposal and make a short film.
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Description
ANTHR 6235 : Bioarchaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3235, ARKEO 3235, ARKEO 6235 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Matthew Velasco
Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.
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Description
ANTHR 6416 : The Barbarians
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3416, ASIAN 3332, ASIAN 6632 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Magnus Fiskesjo
The idea of the barbarians is as old as civilization itself. But what is a barbarian, and what is the role that barbarians play, as the savage enemies of civilization? In this course we will address such questions by looking at how different civilizations have imagined their barbarians, ranging from their key role in Greek drama, and as infidels in religious conceptions, to Chinese walls, and American savagery. We will examine both historical examples, and the barbarians of today -- the terrorists and insurgents so often framed as dark and primitive, in contrast with ourselves. Through readings and visual materials, we will seek to discover what these barbarians have in common. We will look comparatively for the underlying patterns of history that the barbarians are drafted from, to draw a new picture of the barbarians. At the same time, we will arrive at a new understanding of civilization as such, as well as of the general nature of human inequality, and how it is justified.   
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ANTHR 6440 : Proposal Development
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Marina Welker
This seminar focuses on preparing a full-scale proposal for anthropological fieldwork for a dissertation. Topics include identifying appropriate funding sources; defining a researchable problem; selecting and justifying a particular fieldwork site; situating the ethnographic case within appropriate theoretical contexts; selecting and justifying appropriate research methodologies; developing a feasible timetable for field research; ethical considerations and human subjects protection procedures; and preparing appropriate budgets. This is a writing seminar, and students will complete a proposal suitable for submission to a major funding agency in the social sciences.
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ANTHR 6703 : Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective
Crosslisted as: AAS 3030, AMST 3703, ANTHR 3703 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Viranjini Munasinghe
The common perception of ethnicity is that it is a "natural" and an inevitable consequence of cultural difference. "Asians" overseas, in particular, have won repute as a people who cling tenaciously to their culture and refuse to assimilate into their host societies and cultures. But, who are the "Asians?" On what basis can we label "Asians" an ethnic group? Although there is a significant Asian presence in the Caribbean, the category "Asian" itself does not exist in the Caribbean. What does this say about the nature of categories that label and demarcate groups of people on the basis of alleged cultural and phenotypical characteristics? This course will examine the dynamics behind group identity, namely ethnicity, by comparing and contrasting the multicultural experience of Asian populations in the Caribbean and the United States. Ethnographic case studies will focus on the East Indian and Chinese experiences in the Caribbean and the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipino, and Indian experiences in the United States.
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ANTHR 7120 : Anthropology and Ontology
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Paul Nadasdy
In recent years, it has become fashionable in anthropology to write about ontology, so much so that some have begun referring to an "ontological turn" in the discipline. Although many see interest in questions of ontology as something new, in fact such questions have important antecedents both in anthropology and related disciplines. Accordingly, we will read classical as well as more contemporary works that engage with issues now considered "ontological." The idea is neither to advocate for nor "debunk" the notion of ontology, but rather to engage with it in its proper historical and theoretical context. We will reflect deeply and critically on what – if anything – "ontology" enables us to think/analyze that older notions like "worldview" and "culture" do not.
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ANTHR 7235 : Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4235, ARKEO 4235, ARKEO 7235 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Frederic Gleach
"Res ipsa loquitur" -- the thing speaks for itself. This common expression captures a widespread belief about objects' roles in human lives, but "hearing" what objects have to say is actually a complex cultural process. An object rarely has a single meaning; they are read variously in different cultural settings, and even by different individuals within a cultural system. How does one know -- can one know -- the meanings of an object? How are objects strategically deployed in social interaction (particularly in cross-cultural interactions, where each side may have radically different understandings)? How does one even know what an object is? We will explore the history and variety of ways that material culture and its meanings have been studied, using archaeological and ethnographic examples.
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ANTHR 7264 : Zooarchaeological Interpretation
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4264, ARKEO 4264, ARKEO 7264 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Nerissa Russell
This course is intended to follow on from Zooarchaeological Method in the fall; it is assumed that students have some familiarity with the nature of zooarchaeological material.  In this course, we will consider issues related to the interpretation of archaeological animal bones: quantification, seasonality, taphonomy, subsistence, the origins of hunting, animal domestication, modes of consumption, meat sharing, the use of secondary products (milk, wool, traction).
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ANTHR 7268 : Aztecs and Their Empire: Myth, History, and Politics
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4268, ARKEO 4268, ARKEO 7268, LATA 4268, LATA 7268 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
John Henderson
Examines the structure and history of the largest polity in ancient Mexico, the "empire" of the Aztecs, using descriptions left by Spanish invaders, accounts written by Aztecs under Colonial rule, and archaeological evidence. Explores Aztec visions of the past, emphasizing the roles of myth, religion, and identity in Aztec statecraft and the construction of history.
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Description
ANTHR 7409 : Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4409 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Sofia Villenas
This course is an introduction to the practice and conceptual foundations of qualitative research methods in the social sciences. Students will learn different approaches with the opportunity to experience the practical dimensions of conducting a qualitative study, including research design, participant observation, interviewing, discourse analysis, and narrative inquiry. In the process, we will explore the principles, theories and epistemologies informing various paradigms in qualitative research. What does it mean to do interpretive research? What do feminist and critical ethnographies look like? What are critical race methodologies? What does it mean to think with performativity, power, deconstruction, desire or decoloniality? We will also examine dilemmas and issues concerning ethics, informed consent, researcher positionality and relationships, and writing and reporting.
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ANTHR 7451 : Time and Temporality
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4451 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lucinda Ramberg
The concept of historical progress of mankind (sic) cannot be sundered from the concept of its progression through a homogeneous, empty time. - Walter Benjamin
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ANTHR 7460 : Heritage and its Entanglements: Representing, Collecting, and Preserving Cultural Identity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4460, ARKEO 4460, ARKEO 7460 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
John Henderson
An exploration of the ways that cultural heritage is embodied in things, particularly archaeological landscapes, sites, and artifacts.   Identifying stakeholders in relation to collecting and controlling these things and representing heritage is a key focus:  what voices should states and other political entities have?  local residents? descendants?  How should descendants be identified?  Other key topics include looting and the market in smuggled antiquities; repatriation; the ethics of studying and publishing looted objects; community engagement; forces that destroy heritage and strategies for preserving it; re-invented and imagined heritage.  These issues will be examined using the collections of the Johnson Museum of Art and through case studies, including Colonial Williamsburg, African Burial Ground, Harriet Tubman House, the ancient Maya, and archaeology in the Third Reich.
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ANTHR 7473 : Messiah and Modernity
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4473, GERST 4473, GERST 7473, JWST 4473, JWST 7473, NES 4473, NES 7473 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jonathan Boyarin
This course combines Jewish religious history with studies in the philosophy of modernity, focusing on changing conceptions of time and history.  We will interrogate possible or implicit connections between traditional Jewish notions of Messianic redemption on one hand, and post-Enlightenment conceptions of revolution and progress on the other (always bearing in mind that the dominant Christian ideology in the West also has Messianic content).  Some readings will provide historical background on Jewish Messianism.  We will explore aspects of the intellectual dialogue between Walter Benjamin, a leading European thinker on literature and the philosophy of history in the first decades of the twentieth century, and his lifelong friend Gershom Scholem, founder of the scholarly study of Jewish mysticism.  We will continue by considering how post-World War II thinkers, especially on the Continent, have responded to the critique of modern ideologies of progress inaugurated by Benjamin and his friends in the so-called "Frankfurt School." 
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ANTHR 7479 : Ethnicity and Identity Politics: An Anthropological Perspective
Crosslisted as: AAS 4790, AAS 7479, ANTHR 4479 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Viranjini Munasinghe
The most baffling aspect of ethnicity is that while ethnic sentiments and movements gain ground rapidly within the international arena, the claim that ethnicity does not exist in any objective sense is also receiving increasing credence within the academic community. How can something thought "not to exist" have such profound consequences in the real world? In lay understandings, ethnicity is believed to be a "natural" disposition of humanity. If so, why does ethnicity mean different "things" in different places? Anthropology has much to contribute to a greater understanding of this perplexing phenomenon. After all, the defining criterion for ethnic groups is that of cultural distinctiveness. Through ethnographic case studies, this course will examine some of the key anthropological approaches to ethnicity. We will explore the relationship of ethnicity to culture, ethnicity to nation, and ethnicity to state to better understand the role ethnicity plays in the identity politics of today.
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ANTHR 7520 : Southeast Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Magnus Fiskesjo
Marina Welker
Andrew Willford
Independent reading course on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7530 : South Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
David Holmberg
Kathryn March
Viranjini Munasinghe
Lucinda Ramberg
Andrew Willford
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7540 : Problems in Himalayan Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
David Holmberg
Kathryn March
Description
ANTHR 7550 : East Asia: Readings in Special Problems
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Hirokazu Miyazaki
Annelise Riles
Magnus Fiskesjo
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7900 : Department of Anthropology Colloquium
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Adam Arcadi
Magnus Fiskesjo
Frederic Gleach
Matthew Velasco
John Henderson
Kurt Jordan
Stacey Langwick
Hirokazu Miyazaki
Viranjini Munasinghe
Annelise Riles
Nerissa Russell
P. Steven Sangren
Vilma Santiago-Irizarry
Thomas Volman
Marina Welker
Andrew Willford
Sofia Villenas
Lucinda Ramberg
Saida Hodzic
Adam Smith
Jonathan Boyarin
A bi-weekly series of workshops and lectures on a range of themes in the discipline sponsored by the Department of Anthropology. Presentations include lectures by invited speakers, debates featuring prominent anthropologists from across the globe, and works in progress presented by anthropology faculty and graduate students.
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ANTHR 7910 : Independent Study: Grad I
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Adam Arcadi
Paul Nadasdy
Matthew Velasco
Billie Isbell
Jane Fajans
Magnus Fiskesjo
Frederic Gleach
Kurt Jordan
Stacey Langwick
Kathryn March
Hirokazu Miyazaki
Annelise Riles
Nerissa Russell
P. Steven Sangren
Vilma Santiago-Irizarry
Thomas Volman
Marina Welker
Andrew Willford
Sofia Villenas
Lucinda Ramberg
Saida Hodzic
Adam Smith
Jonathan Boyarin
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7920 : Independent Study: Grad II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Adam Arcadi
Billie Isbell
Jane Fajans
Magnus Fiskesjo
Frederic Gleach
John Henderson
David Holmberg
Kurt Jordan
Stacey Langwick
Kathryn March
Hirokazu Miyazaki
Viranjini Munasinghe
Annelise Riles
Nerissa Russell
P. Steven Sangren
Vilma Santiago-Irizarry
Matthew Velasco
Thomas Volman
Marina Welker
Andrew Willford
Paul Nadasdy
Sofia Villenas
Lucinda Ramberg
Saida Hodzic
Adam Smith
Jonathan Boyarin
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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ANTHR 7930 : Independent Study: Grad III
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Adam Arcadi
Billie Isbell
Jane Fajans
Magnus Fiskesjo
Frederic Gleach
John Henderson
David Holmberg
Kurt Jordan
Stacey Langwick
Kathryn March
Hirokazu Miyazaki
Viranjini Munasinghe
Annelise Riles
Nerissa Russell
P. Steven Sangren
Vilma Santiago-Irizarry
Matthew Velasco
Thomas Volman
Marina Welker
Andrew Willford
Paul Nadasdy
Sofia Villenas
Lucinda Ramberg
Saida Hodzic
Adam Smith
Jonathan Boyarin
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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Description