Courses - Spring 2021

ANTHR 1101 FWS: Culture, Society, and Power

This First-Year Writing Seminar is devoted to the anthropological study of the human condition. Anthropology examines all aspects of human experience, from the evolution of the species to contemporary challenges of politics, environment, and society. The discipline emphasizes empirically rich field research informed by sophisticated theoretical understandings of human social life and cultural production. The diversity of anthropology's interests provides a diverse array of stimulating opportunities to write critically about the human condition. Topics vary by semester.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Simon Posner (sdp83)
Full details for ANTHR 1101 : FWS: Culture, Society, and Power
ANTHR 1300 Human Evolution: Genes, Behavior, and the Fossil Record

The evolution of humankind is explored through the fossil record, studies of the biological differences among current human populations, and a comparison with our closest relatives, the primates. This course investigates the roots of human biology and behavior with an evolutionary framework.

Distribution: (PBSS-AS, BIO-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 1300 : Human Evolution: Genes, Behavior, and the Fossil Record
ANTHR 2201 Early Agriculture

Throughout most of the human career, people survived by hunting and gathering wild foods. The advent of food production is one of the most profound changes in history and prehistory. This course examines the current evidence for the appearance and spread of agriculture - plant and animal domestication - around the world. We will consider definitions of agriculture and domestication, the conditions under which it arises, the consequences for those who adopt it, and why it has spread over most of the world. 

Distribution: (HA-AS, GLC-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Nerissa Russell (nr29)
Full details for ANTHR 2201 : Early Agriculture
ANTHR 2400 Cultural Diversity and Contemporary Issues

This course will introduce students to the meaning and significance of forms of cultural diversity for the understanding of contemporary issues. Drawing from films, videos, and selected readings, students will be confronted with different representational forms that portray cultures in various parts of the world, and they will be asked to examine critically their own prejudices as they influence the perception and evaluation of cultural differences. We shall approach cultures holistically, assuming the inseparability of economies, kinship, religion, and politics, as well as interconnections and dependencies between world areas such as Africa, Latin America, the West. Among the issues considered: political correctness and truth; nativism and ecological diversity; race, ethnicity, and sexuality; sin, religion, and war; global process and cultural integrity.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, GLC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Natasha Raheja (nr446)
Full details for ANTHR 2400 : Cultural Diversity and Contemporary Issues
ANTHR 2468 Medicine, Culture, and Society

Medicine has become the language and practice through which we address a broad range of both individual and societal complaints. Interest in this medicalization of life may be one of the reasons that medical anthropology is currently the fastest-growing subfield in anthropology. This course encourages students to examine concepts of disease, suffering, health, and well-being in their immediate experience and beyond. In the process, students will gain a working knowledge of ecological, critical, phenomenological, and applied approaches used by medical anthropologists. We will investigate what is involved in becoming a doctor, the sociality of medicines, controversies over new medical technologies, and the politics of medical knowledge. The universality of biomedicine, or hospital medicine, will not be taken for granted, but rather we will examine the plurality generated by the various political, economic, social, and ethical demands under which biomedicine has developed in different places and at different times. In addition, biomedical healing and expertise will be viewed in relation to other kinds of healing and expertise. Our readings will address medicine in North America as well as other parts of the world. In class, our discussions will return regularly to consider the broad diversity of kinds of medicine throughout the world, as well as the specific historical and local contexts of biomedicine.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Stacey Langwick (sal54)
Full details for ANTHR 2468 : Medicine, Culture, and Society
ANTHR 2482 Anthropology of Climate Change

What does it mean to study humanity at a time when it has become a geological force? What is required of us as thinking subjects under the Anthropocene? In this course, we will argue that anthropologists have an important role to play at this historical juncture. But we will also consider how climate change troubles some of the discipline's central categories. Time, space, nature, power, reason – climate change throws these concepts into question. It inflects our ways of knowing. It demands adaptive thinking. Throughout the semester, we will take on this work in common, proceeding from the presumption that it is not enough to think of climate change as a simple ethnographic object. Climate change is the unavoidable context of contemporary anthropology.

Distribution: (CA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Chloe Ahmann (cak272)
Full details for ANTHR 2482 : Anthropology of Climate Change
ANTHR 2750 Human Biology and Evolution

Examines the theories and mechanisms of modern evolutionary biology as they apply to present-day humans and their hominid ancestors. Lectures and discussions of molecular and paleontological evidence of human evolution, the causes and consequences of contemporary human biological diversity, and biological and behavioral modes of human adaptation to past and present natural and cultural environments.

Distribution: (PBSS-AS, BIO-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Zhenglong Gu (zg27)
Full details for ANTHR 2750 : Human Biology and Evolution
ANTHR 3042 Paleoethnobotany

This course will prepare students to identify, analyze, and interpret plant remains gathered from archaeological sites. We will build a conceptual framework to explain how human behavior relates to plant patterning, drawing on case studies from around the world. Through hands-on laboratory activities, we will study aspects of plant anatomy and explore methods for the sampling and identification of plant remains, including charred seeds and wood, phytoliths, starch grains, and pollen. We will analyze paleoethnobotanical datasets using database and statistical programs to present evidence in varying formats. Final projects will involve the first-hand study of plant remains sampled from archaeological sites.

Distribution: (PBSS-AS, BIO-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Maia Dedrick (mcd225)
Full details for ANTHR 3042 : Paleoethnobotany
ANTHR 3061 Computing Cultures

Computers are powerful tools for working, playing, thinking, and living. Laptops, PDAs, webcams, cell phones, and iPods are not just devices, they also provide narratives, metaphors, and ways of seeing the world. This course critically examines how computing technology and society shape each other and how this plays out in our everyday lives. Identifies how computers, networks, and information technologies reproduce, reinforce, and rework existing cultural trends, norms, and values. Looks at the values embodied in the cultures of computing and considers alternative ways to imagine, build, and work with information technologies.

Distribution: (CA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Malte Ziewitz (mcz35)
Full details for ANTHR 3061 : Computing Cultures
ANTHR 3230 Humans and Animals

Human-animal relationships are often seen in utilitarian, nutritional terms, particularly in archaeology. But animals and meat have significance far beyond their economic value. This course focuses on a broad range of these non-dietary roles of animals in human societies, past and present. This includes the fundamental shift in human-animal relations associated with domestication; the varied meanings of wild and domestic animals; as well as the importance of animals as wealth, as objects of sacrifice, as totems or metaphors for humans, and as symbols in art. Meat can be used in feasting and meat sharing to create, cement, and manipulate social relationships. This course is open to students of archaeology, cultural anthropology, and other disciplines with an interest in human-animal relations.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Nerissa Russell (nr29)
Full details for ANTHR 3230 : Humans and Animals
ANTHR 3325 Food and Work

This course will explore key topics in the critical study of labor and capitalism through the lens of food. Questions of race, gender, and class, but also toxicity, settler colonialism, as well as production and reproduction can all be read in the landscapes of food provision and procurement. Food is the ground for an array of labor processes—planting, harvesting, transporting, serving, and eating, just to name a few. Some of these forms of work are overt (stooped workers toiling in pesticide ridden field, for example). But some of these forms of work are invisible and unpaid. And sometimes, they are incredibly well remunerated but totally shadowy. By studying these different forms of work comparatively, we can understand genealogies and futures of inequality, resource use, and the nature of work itself. 

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sarah Besky (sb2626)
Full details for ANTHR 3325 : Food and Work
ANTHR 3390 Primate Behavior and Ecology with Emphasis on African Apes

The course will investigate all aspects of non-human primate life. Based on the fundamentals of evolutionary theory, group and inter-individual behaviors will be presented. In addition, an understanding of group structure and breeding systems will be reached through an evaluation of ecological constraints imposed on primates in different habitats. Subjects include: primate taxonomy, diet and foraging, predation, cooperation and competition, social ontogeny, kinship, and mating strategies.

Distribution: (PBSS-AS, BIO-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 3390 : Primate Behavior and Ecology with Emphasis on African Apes
ANTHR 3405 Multicultural Issues in Education

This course explores research on race, ethnicity and language in American education. It examines historical and current patterns of school achievement for minoritized youths. It also examines the cultural and social premises undergirding educational practices in diverse communities and schools. Policies, programs and pedagogy, including multicultural and bilingual education, are explored.

Distribution: (CA-AS, SCD-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sofia Villenas (sav33)
Full details for ANTHR 3405 : Multicultural Issues in Education
ANTHR 3413 Anthropology of Global Health

The term global health refers to an aspiration and a set of problems.  As an aspiration, global health seeks to unite biosecurity, humanitarian, and philanthropic efforts to rid the world of disease.  Seen as a set of problems, global health is more unruly.  Deciding when an epidemic becomes a global emergency, or calculating the economic value of healthy childbirth, is anything but straightforward.  Drawing on critical texts from medical anthropology, science studies, and allied fields, this course asks: What is the relationship of global health to colonialism and empire?   How do market and political actors shape health interventions?  Finally, what is the future for global health in the context of a changing climate?

Distribution: (SBA-AS, GLC-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Alex Nading (amn242)
Full details for ANTHR 3413 : Anthropology of Global Health
ANTHR 3420 Myth, Ritual, and Symbol

This course approaches the study of religion, symbols, and myth from an anthropological perspective. The centrality and universality of religion and myth-making in social and symbolic life has been fundamental in the development of cultural theory. Our aim is to understand with this is so. We begin by examining the classic theories of religion in the works of Durkheim, Marx, Weber, Mauss, and Freud, among others, followed by an exploration of how these theories have been influential in anthropological studies of symbolism, cosmology, ritual, selfhood, myth, sorcery, witchcraft, and pilgrimage. We conclude by examining the apparent persistence, revival and transformation of religious and magical beliefs and practices within modern, modernizing, and postcolonial states. We ask whether an increasing politicization and globalization of religious ideology through technological mediation poses significant challenges to the anthropological analysis of religion. In so doing, we also try to understand better the human experience of and identification with the spiritual, mythical, and religious in the contemporary moment. This, in turn, leads us to investigate the inherent volatility of such identifications and experiences within the larger national and global framework of cultural politics.

Distribution: (CA-AS, ALC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Andrew Willford (acw24)
Full details for ANTHR 3420 : Myth, Ritual, and Symbol
ANTHR 3422 Culture, Politics, and Environment in the Circumpolar North

This course examines the cultures and histories of the circumpolar North. The primary emphasis is on the North American Arctic and Subarctic with some attention to northern Eurasia for comparative purposes. The focus is on the indigenous peoples of the region and the socio-political and ecological dimensions of their evolving relationships with southern industrial societies.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Paul Nadasdy (pn79)
Full details for ANTHR 3422 : Culture, Politics, and Environment in the Circumpolar North
ANTHR 3475 Ethnoracial Identity in Anthropology, Language, and Law

In this course, we examine the role that law and language, as mutually constitutive mediating systems, occupy in constructing ethnoracial identity in the United States. We will approach law from a critical anthropological perspective, as a signifying and significant sociocultural system, rather than as an objective structure of rational rules and processes, to consider how legal norms, procedures, and discourses inform other processes of sociocultural production and reproduction, thus contributing to the creation and maintenance of differential power relations. We will draw on anthropological, linguistic, and critical race theory as well as ethnographic and legal material to guide and document our analyses.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Vilma Santiago-Irizarry (vs23)
Full details for ANTHR 3475 : Ethnoracial Identity in Anthropology, Language, and Law
ANTHR 3703 Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective

The common perception of ethnicity is that it is a natural and an inevitable consequence of cultural difference. Asians overseas, in particular, have won repute as a people who cling tenaciously to their culture and refuse to assimilate into their host societies and cultures. But, who are the Asians? On what basis can we label Asians an ethnic group? Although there is a significant Asian presence in the Caribbean, the category Asian itself does not exist in the Caribbean. What does this say about the nature of categories that label and demarcate groups of people on the basis of alleged cultural and phenotypical characteristics? This course will examine the dynamics behind group identity, namely ethnicity, by comparing and contrasting the multicultural experience of Asian populations in the Caribbean and the United States. Ethnographic case studies will focus on the East Indian and Chinese experiences in the Caribbean and the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipino, and Indian experiences in the United States.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Viranjini Munasinghe (vpm1)
Full details for ANTHR 3703 : Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective
ANTHR 3950 Humanities Scholars Research Methods

This course explores the practice, theory, and methodology of humanities research, critical analysis, and communication through writing and oral presentation. We will study the work and impact of humanists (scholars of literature, history, theory, art, visual studies, film, anthropology, gender and sexuality studies), who pose big questions about the human condition. By reading and analyzing their scholarship—critiquing them and engaging their ideas—we will craft our own methods and voices. Students will refine their research methods (library research, note taking, organizing material, bibliographies, citation methods, proposals, outlines, etc.) and design their own independent research project. Students enrolled in this seminar will have the opportunity to participate in the Humanities Scholars Program.

Distribution: (CA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Durba Ghosh (dg256)
Full details for ANTHR 3950 : Humanities Scholars Research Methods
ANTHR 4100 Public Service Capstone

This capstone course is intended for students who are completing the Public Service Studies minor. It provides an academic space to support students' reflection on their culminating experience with their community partners and community-based projects. Students will explore connections between their various fields of study, community engagement work, and personal development. Students will also conduct background research on the organizations or project stakeholders to better understand the issues and challenges facing their communities.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sofia Villenas (sav33)
Full details for ANTHR 4100 : Public Service Capstone
ANTHR 4176 Humanitarian Affects

Liberal feminists and political theorists argue that sentiments such as compassion and empathy have the capacity to alert us to suffering, injustice, and oppression, and thus incite transformative political action. This interdisciplinary seminar explores the challenges to this theory by staging a conversation between postcolonial, feminist, and queer theories of affect, and anthropological critiques of humanitarian projects. Sentiments are mobilized to defend borders, wage wars, grant asylum to refugees, provide medical care and disaster relief, and inspire feminist activism. We will analyze how these gendered and racialized ethical projects and political regimes are co-constituted, and how they mediate access to resources and survival, as well as political agency, subjectivity, citizenship, and national belonging.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Saida Hodzic (sh888)
Full details for ANTHR 4176 : Humanitarian Affects
ANTHR 4235 Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture

Res ipsa loquitur -- the thing speaks for itself. This common expression captures a widespread belief about objects' roles in human lives, but deciphering what objects have to say is actually a complex cultural process. An object rarely has a single meaning; they are read variously in different cultural settings, and even by different individuals within a cultural system. How does one know, can one know, the meanings of an object? How are objects strategically deployed in social interaction, particularly in cross-cultural interactions where each side may have radically different understandings? How does one even know what an object is? We will explore the history and variety of ways that material culture and its meanings have been studied, using archaeological and ethnographic examples.

Distribution: (HA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Frederic Gleach (fwg1)
Full details for ANTHR 4235 : Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture
ANTHR 4250 Archaeological Research Design

This studio-style seminar provides an in-depth examination of the principles and practices of archaeological research design. We will examine all aspects of the research process, from concept formation, to methodology, to ethical practice and data management. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake a series of projects that will build incrementally into a research proposal. We will focus on developing the skills vital to designing archaeological research, starting with the formulation of a question and continuing through the exploratory process of defining proper sites, assemblages, analytical techniques, and presentation of findings. Class sessions will focus on designing research projects examining case studies drawn from world archaeology and student research projects.

Distribution: (HA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Smith (ats73)
Full details for ANTHR 4250 : Archaeological Research Design
ANTHR 4402 Anthropology of Education

This seminar examines public schools and other educational spaces as sites where knowledge, learning, learner, and identities are produced and contested. It explores how power and cultural norms work in educational settings, and the unintended teaching and learning that happens outside the purported curriculum. Topics include issues of multiculturalism and pluralism in schools and society, the school achievement of racial and ethnic minorities, youth cultures and identities, and literacy in adult learning spaces. This course is for students interested in the advanced study of multicultural schooling and education.

Distribution: (CA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sofia Villenas (sav33)
Full details for ANTHR 4402 : Anthropology of Education
ANTHR 4418 Writing Ethnography: Theory, Genre and Practice

What are the poetics and politics of ethnographic writing? How is this genre, what many would call the signature of cultural anthropology, distinct from other modes of scholarly writing? What are its possibilities, limits and effects? In this course we will read classic and experimental ethnographies and undertake exercises in ethnographic writing as a means to investigate ethnography as epistemology, genre and craft.

Distribution: (CA-AS, ALC-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Lucinda Ramberg (ler35)
Full details for ANTHR 4418 : Writing Ethnography: Theory, Genre and Practice
ANTHR 4424 Ethnographic Film Theory and History

This seminar explores the history and theory of ethnographic film. Keeping in mind broader issues of cross-cultural representation, we consider the evolution of ethnographic film as a genre for representing "reality", embodied practices, and anthropological concepts. Students will examine ethnographic authority, the production of otherness, and the sensory dimensions of knowledge production. The course charts out various approaches to ethnographic film, ranging from the mobilization of the camera as a tool for storytelling, scientific record and analysis, empowerment and political advocacy, and arts and aesthetics. We will theorize the role and status of ethnographic film as a signifying practice, form of meaning-making, and mode of anthropological theory building. We will pay close attention to the ethical and political concerns of cross-cultural communication and representation.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Natasha Raheja (nr446)
Full details for ANTHR 4424 : Ethnographic Film Theory and History
ANTHR 4476 Carceral Worlds: Policing, Prisons, and Securitization

Grounded in anthropological and interdisciplinary analyses of policing, prisons, and security, this course aims to account for how carcerality shapes our worlds. Attentive to specificity and variability across place and time, we will consider how carceral logics take hold and expand, and how they are contested and reimagined. We will pay particular attention to the interrelatedness of race and carcerality; lived experiences of carcerality, including those of people imprisoned in various contexts and those engaged in carceral work; the intersections between carcerality and science and technology; and abolitionist frameworks that address the limitations and constitutive oppressions of carcerality as they radically reimagine other possibilities.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Noah Tamarkin (nt383)
Full details for ANTHR 4476 : Carceral Worlds: Policing, Prisons, and Securitization
ANTHR 4910 Independent Study: Undergrad I

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 4910 : Independent Study: Undergrad I
ANTHR 4920 Independent Study: Undergrad II

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 4920 : Independent Study: Undergrad II
ANTHR 4984 Honors Thesis Write-Up

Final write-up of the thesis under the direct supervision of the thesis advisor, who will assign the grade for this course.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 4984 : Honors Thesis Write-Up
ANTHR 4992 Honors Workshop II

Course will consist of weekly, seminar-style meetings of all thesis writers until mid-semester, under the direction of the honors chair. This second semester concentrates on preparation of a full draft of the thesis by mid-semester, with ample time left for revisions prior to submission. Group meetings will concentrate on collective reviewing of the work of other students, presentation of research, and the like.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Saida Hodzic (sh888)
Full details for ANTHR 4992 : Honors Workshop II
ANTHR 6025 Proseminar in Anthropology

This course explores advanced topics in anthropological theory and practice. It builds on the history of the discipline that students will have examined in the preceding course ANTHR 6020, and seeks to immerse students in major contemporary theoretical developments and debates and the discipline's most pressing concerns. Coursework will proceed mainly by way of reading, writing, and discussion.  

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Andrew Willford (acw24)
Full details for ANTHR 6025 : Proseminar in Anthropology
ANTHR 6042 Paleoethnobotany

This course will prepare students to identify, analyze, and interpret plant remains gathered from archaeological sites. We will build a conceptual framework to explain how human behavior relates to plant patterning, drawing on case studies from around the world. Through hands-on laboratory activities, we will study aspects of plant anatomy and explore methods for the sampling and identification of plant remains, including charred seeds and wood, phytoliths, starch grains, and pollen. We will analyze paleoethnobotanical datasets using database and statistical programs to present evidence in varying formats. Final projects will involve the first-hand study of plant remains sampled from archaeological sites.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Maia Dedrick (mcd225)
Full details for ANTHR 6042 : Paleoethnobotany
ANTHR 6230 Humans and Animals

Human-animal relationships are often seen in utilitarian, nutritional terms, particularly in archaeology. But animals and meat have significance far beyond their economic value. This course focuses on a broad range of these non-dietary roles of animals in human societies, past and present. This includes the fundamental shift in human-animal relations associated with domestication; the varied meanings of wild and domestic animals; as well as the importance of animals as wealth, as objects of sacrifice, as totems or metaphors for humans, and as symbols in art. Meat can be used in feasting and meat sharing to create, cement, and manipulate social relationships. This course is open to students of archaeology, cultural anthropology, and other disciplines with an interest in human-animal relations.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Nerissa Russell (nr29)
Full details for ANTHR 6230 : Humans and Animals
ANTHR 6250 Archaeological Research Design

This studio-style seminar provides an in-depth examination of the principles and practices of archaeological research design. We will examine all aspects of the research process, from concept formation, to methodology, to ethical practice and data management. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake a series of projects that will build incrementally into a research proposal. We will focus on developing the skills vital to designing archaeological research, starting with the formulation of a question and continuing through the exploratory process of defining proper sites, assemblages, analytical techniques, and presentation of findings. Class sessions will focus on designing research projects examining case studies drawn from world archaeology and student research projects.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Adam Smith (ats73)
Full details for ANTHR 6250 : Archaeological Research Design
ANTHR 6301 Social Theory

Sociologist C. Wright Mills challenged his readers to develop their "sociological imagination" to understand the social and historical forces at work in seemingly individual events, such as the receipt of a pink slip, a draft card, or a drug prescription. Within science and technology studies, scholars have documented how social issues can become scientific, technological, or medical, often appearing to leave the social realm naturalized, normalized, or pathologized. This course introduces graduate students to classic texts and concepts in social theory with a focus on how scholars apply such theories to empirical research. It will consider major thinkers and schools of social thought, such as Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Mannheim, Foucault, and the Frankfurt School. It will also consider how a nuanced interplay of theory and empirical data can bring critically important insights to both theoretical and empirical understandings of the world. The course is relevant for students in sociology, history, and anthropology who are interested in social theory.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Rachel Prentice (rep35)
Full details for ANTHR 6301 : Social Theory
ANTHR 6413 Anthropology of Global Health

The term global health refers to an aspiration and a set of problems.  As an aspiration, global health seeks to unite biosecurity, humanitarian, and philanthropic efforts to rid the world of disease.  Seen as a set of problems, global health is more unruly.  Deciding when an epidemic becomes a global emergency, or calculating the economic value of healthy childbirth, is anything but straightforward.  Drawing on critical texts from medical anthropology, science studies, and allied fields, this course asks: What is the relationship of global health to colonialism and empire?   How do market and political actors shape health interventions?  Finally, what is the future for global health in the context of a changing climate?

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Alex Nading (amn242)
Full details for ANTHR 6413 : Anthropology of Global Health
ANTHR 6422 Culture, Politics, and Environment in the Circumpolar North

This course examines the cultures and histories of the circumpolar North. The primary emphasis is on the North American Arctic and Subarctic with some attention to northern Eurasia for comparative purposes. The focus is on the indigenous peoples of the region and the socio-political and ecological dimensions of their evolving relationships with southern industrial societies.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Paul Nadasdy (pn79)
Full details for ANTHR 6422 : Culture, Politics, and Environment in the Circumpolar North
ANTHR 6424 Ethnoracial Identity in Anthropology, Language, and Law

In this course, we examine the role that law and language, as mutually constitutive mediating systems, occupy in constructing ethnoracial identity in the United States. We will approach law from a critical anthropological perspective, as a signifying and significant sociocultural system, rather than as an objective structure of rational rules and processes, to consider how legal norms, procedures, and discourses inform other processes of sociocultural production and reproduction, thus contributing to the creation and maintenance of differential power relations. We will draw on anthropological, linguistic, and critical race theory as well as ethnographic and legal material to guide and document our analyses.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Vilma Santiago-Irizarry (vs23)
Full details for ANTHR 6424 : Ethnoracial Identity in Anthropology, Language, and Law
ANTHR 6440 Proposal Development

This seminar focuses on preparing a full-scale proposal for anthropological fieldwork for a dissertation. Topics include identifying appropriate funding sources; defining a researchable problem; selecting and justifying a particular fieldwork site; situating the ethnographic case within appropriate theoretical contexts; selecting and justifying appropriate research methodologies; developing a feasible timetable for field research; ethical considerations and human subjects protection procedures; and preparing appropriate budgets. This is a writing seminar, and students will complete a proposal suitable for submission to a major funding agency in the social sciences.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Chloe Ahmann (cak272)
Full details for ANTHR 6440 : Proposal Development
ANTHR 6482 Perspectives on the Nation

This course will critically examine the key texts that have informed our understanding of the nation and nationalism. Beginning with some of the founding texts such as Hahn Kohn's The Idea of Nationalism: A Study in its Origins and Backgrounds, Plamenatz's Two Types of Nationalism, and Renan's What is a Nation, we will then move on to more contemporary writings by Gellner, Hobsbawm and Anderson and end with analytical approaches addressing the national question in postcolonial contexts such as Partha Chatterjee's Nationalist Thought and the Colonial World. A central theme will be how culture, power, and history are implicated in the concept of Nation. We will also explore the possibilities of an ethnographic approach to the nation and ask if such an analytical and methodological move may help us better grapple with the perplexing emotive dimension of nationalisms.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Viranjini Munasinghe (vpm1)
Full details for ANTHR 6482 : Perspectives on the Nation
ANTHR 6703 Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective

The common perception of ethnicity is that it is a natural and an inevitable consequence of cultural difference. Asians overseas, in particular, have won repute as a people who cling tenaciously to their culture and refuse to assimilate into their host societies and cultures. But, who are the Asians? On what basis can we label Asians an ethnic group? Although there is a significant Asian presence in the Caribbean, the category Asian itself does not exist in the Caribbean. What does this say about the nature of categories that label and demarcate groups of people on the basis of alleged cultural and phenotypical characteristics? This course will examine the dynamics behind group identity, namely ethnicity, by comparing and contrasting the multicultural experience of Asian populations in the Caribbean and the United States. Ethnographic case studies will focus on the East Indian and Chinese experiences in the Caribbean and the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipino, and Indian experiences in the United States.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Viranjini Munasinghe (vpm1)
Full details for ANTHR 6703 : Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective
ANTHR 7176 Humanitarian Affects

Liberal feminists and political theorists argue that sentiments such as compassion and empathy have the capacity to alert us to suffering, injustice, and oppression, and thus incite transformative political action. This interdisciplinary seminar explores the challenges to this theory by staging a conversation between postcolonial, feminist, and queer theories of affect, and anthropological critiques of humanitarian projects. Sentiments are mobilized to defend borders, wage wars, grant asylum to refugees, provide medical care and disaster relief, and inspire feminist activism. We will analyze how these gendered and racialized ethical projects and political regimes are co-constituted, and how they mediate access to resources and survival, as well as political agency, subjectivity, citizenship, and national belonging.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Saida Hodzic (sh888)
Full details for ANTHR 7176 : Humanitarian Affects
ANTHR 7235 Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture

Res ipsa loquitur -- the thing speaks for itself. This common expression captures a widespread belief about objects' roles in human lives, but deciphering what objects have to say is actually a complex cultural process. An object rarely has a single meaning; they are read variously in different cultural settings, and even by different individuals within a cultural system. How does one know, can one know, the meanings of an object? How are objects strategically deployed in social interaction, particularly in cross-cultural interactions where each side may have radically different understandings? How does one even know what an object is? We will explore the history and variety of ways that material culture and its meanings have been studied, using archaeological and ethnographic examples.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Frederic Gleach (fwg1)
Full details for ANTHR 7235 : Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture
ANTHR 7402 Anthropology of Education

This seminar examines public schools and other educational spaces as sites where knowledge, learning, learner, and identities are produced and contested. It explores how power and cultural norms work in educational settings, and the unintended teaching and learning that happens outside the purported curriculum. Topics include issues of multiculturalism and pluralism in schools and society, the school achievement of racial and ethnic minorities, youth cultures and identities, and literacy in adult learning spaces. This course is for students interested in the advanced study of multicultural schooling and education.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Sofia Villenas (sav33)
Full details for ANTHR 7402 : Anthropology of Education
ANTHR 7418 Writing Ethnography: Theory, Genre and Practice

What are the poetics and politics of ethnographic writing? How is this genre, what many would call the signature of cultural anthropology, distinct from other modes of scholarly writing? What are its possibilities, limits and effects? In this course we will read classic and experimental ethnographies and undertake exercises in ethnographic writing as a means to investigate ethnography as epistemology, genre and craft.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Lucinda Ramberg (ler35)
Full details for ANTHR 7418 : Writing Ethnography: Theory, Genre and Practice
ANTHR 7424 Ethnographic Film Theory and History

This seminar explores the history and theory of ethnographic film. Keeping in mind broader issues of cross-cultural representation, we consider the evolution of ethnographic film as a genre for representing "reality", embodied practices, and anthropological concepts. Students will examine ethnographic authority, the production of otherness, and the sensory dimensions of knowledge production. The course charts out various approaches to ethnographic film, ranging from the mobilization of the camera as a tool for storytelling, scientific record and analysis, empowerment and political advocacy, and arts and aesthetics. We will theorize the role and status of ethnographic film as a signifying practice, form of meaning-making, and mode of anthropological theory building. We will pay close attention to the ethical and political concerns of cross-cultural communication and representation.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Natasha Raheja (nr446)
Full details for ANTHR 7424 : Ethnographic Film Theory and History
ANTHR 7476 Carceral Worlds: Policing, Prisons, and Securitization

Grounded in anthropological and interdisciplinary analyses of policing, prisons, and security, this course aims to account for how carcerality shapes our worlds. Attentive to specificity and variability across place and time, we will consider how carceral logics take hold and expand, and how they are contested and reimagined. We will pay particular attention to the interrelatedness of race and carcerality; lived experiences of carcerality, including those of people imprisoned in various contexts and those engaged in carceral work; the intersections between carcerality and science and technology; and abolitionist frameworks that address the limitations and constitutive oppressions of carcerality as they radically reimagine other possibilities.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Noah Tamarkin (nt383)
Full details for ANTHR 7476 : Carceral Worlds: Policing, Prisons, and Securitization
ANTHR 7520 Southeast Asia: Readings in Special Problems

Independent reading course on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Magnus Fiskesjo (nf42)
Full details for ANTHR 7520 : Southeast Asia: Readings in Special Problems
ANTHR 7530 South Asia: Readings in Special Problems

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: David Holmberg (dhh8)
Full details for ANTHR 7530 : South Asia: Readings in Special Problems
ANTHR 7540 Problems in Himalayan Studies
Academic Career: GR Instructor: David Holmberg (dhh8)
Full details for ANTHR 7540 : Problems in Himalayan Studies
ANTHR 7550 East Asia: Readings in Special Problems

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: GR Full details for ANTHR 7550 : East Asia: Readings in Special Problems
ANTHR 7902 Towards an Anti-Racist and Decolonial Anthropology: Futures
Academic Career: GR Instructor: Lucinda Ramberg (ler35)
Full details for ANTHR 7902 : Towards an Anti-Racist and Decolonial Anthropology: Futures
ANTHR 7910 Independent Study: Grad I

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 7910 : Independent Study: Grad I
ANTHR 7920 Independent Study: Grad II

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 7920 : Independent Study: Grad II
ANTHR 7930 Independent Study: Grad III

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 7930 : Independent Study: Grad III
ARKEO 1702 Archaeology-Great Discoveries

This introductory course surveys the archaeology of the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean. Each week, we will explore a different archaeological discovery that transformed scholars' understanding of the ancient world. From early excavations at sites such as Pompeii and Troy, to modern field projects across the Mediterranean, we will discover the rich cultures of ancient Greece and Rome while also exploring the history, methods, and major intellectual goals of archaeology.

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Caitlin Barrett (ceb329)
Full details for ARKEO 1702 : Archaeology-Great Discoveries
ARKEO 2201 Early Agriculture

Throughout most of the human career, people survived by hunting and gathering wild foods. The advent of food production is one of the most profound changes in history and prehistory. This course examines the current evidence for the appearance and spread of agriculture - plant and animal domestication - around the world. We will consider definitions of agriculture and domestication, the conditions under which it arises, the consequences for those who adopt it, and why it has spread over most of the world. 

Distribution: (HA-AS, GLC-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Nerissa Russell (nr29)
Full details for ARKEO 2201 : Early Agriculture
ARKEO 2522 Drinking through the Ages: Intoxicating Beverages in Near Eastern and World History

This course examines the production and exchange of wine, beer, coffee and tea, and the social and ideological dynamics involved in their consumption. We start in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and end with tea and coffee in the Arab and Ottoman worlds. Archaeological and textual evidence will be used throughout to show the centrality of drinking in daily, ritual and political life.

Distribution: (CA-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Christopher Monroe (cmm253)
Full details for ARKEO 2522 : Drinking through the Ages: Intoxicating Beverages in Near Eastern and World History
ARKEO 2661 Ancient Ships and Seafaring: Introduction to Nautical Archaeology

A survey of the history and development of ships and seafaring as revealed by shipwrecks, boat burials, texts, art, and other evidence. The role of nautical technology and seafaring among the maritime peoples of the ancient Mediterranean world-Canaanites, Minoans, Mycenaeans, Phoenicians, Hebrews, Greeks, and Romans-and the riverine cultures of Mesopotamia and Egypt is addressed. The survey stretches from the earliest evidence for Mediterranean seafaring around 10,000 bce to the first transatlantic voyages in the 15th century, including Arab, Viking, and European explorers, and the birth of modern capitalism in the Italian Maritime Republics. Along the way, economics, war, exploration, cult, life at sea, and colonization are discussed.

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Christopher Monroe (cmm253)
Full details for ARKEO 2661 : Ancient Ships and Seafaring: Introduction to Nautical Archaeology
ARKEO 2688 Cleopatra's Egypt: Tradition and Transformation

Following the conquests of Alexander, the ancient civilization of Egypt came under Greek rule. This period is best known for its famous queen Cleopatra, the last independent ruler of ancient Egypt. But even before Cleopatra's life and death, the Egypt that she governed was a fascinating place – and a rich case study in cultural interactions under ancient imperialism. This course explores life in Egypt under Greek rule, during the three centuries known as the Ptolemaic period (named after Cleopatra's family, the Ptolemaic dynasty). We will examine the history and culture of Ptolemaic Egypt, an empire at the crossroads of Africa, the Near East, and the Mediterranean. We will explore the experiences of both Egyptians and Greeks living in this multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-linguistic society. Finally, we will investigate the ways that Ptolemaic Egypt can shed light on modern experiences of imperialism, colonialism, and globalization.

Distribution: (HA-AS, GLC-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Caitlin Barrett (ceb329)
Full details for ARKEO 2688 : Cleopatra's Egypt: Tradition and Transformation
ARKEO 2712 The Ancient Economy

Ancient economies were very different to our modern economy: there were no banks, transport and communication were difficult, and the discipline of economics did not yet exist. Yet there are also striking similarities between the ancient and modern economic worlds: many people liked luxuries, production was increasingly standardized, and buyers and sellers came together on market days. This course introduces the key characteristics of ancient economies, with a focus on ancient Rome but also looking at classical Athens and further afield. It is structured around themes such as trade and exchange, craft, consumption, and money. Its aim is to probe the nature of the ancient economy, both for students interested in the ancient world and for students keen to put the modern economy in historical perspective.

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Astrid Van Oyen (av475)
Full details for ARKEO 2712 : The Ancient Economy
ARKEO 2812 Hieroglyphs to HTML: History of Writing

An introduction to the history and theory of writing systems from cuneiform to the alphabet, historical and new writing media, and the complex relationship of writing technologies to human language and culture. Through hands-on activities and collaborative work, students will explore the shifting definitions of "writing" and the diverse ways in which cultures through time have developed and used writing systems. We will also investigate the traditional divisions of "oral" vs. "written" and consider how digital technologies have affected how we use and think about writing in encoding systems from Morse code to emoji.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Athena Kirk (aek238)
Stephen Sansom (sas688)
Full details for ARKEO 2812 : Hieroglyphs to HTML: History of Writing
ARKEO 3000 Undergraduate Independent Study in Archaeology and Related Fields

Undergraduate students pursue topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Annetta Alexandridis (aa376)
Full details for ARKEO 3000 : Undergraduate Independent Study in Archaeology and Related Fields
ARKEO 3042 Paleoethnobotany

This course will prepare students to identify, analyze, and interpret plant remains gathered from archaeological sites. We will build a conceptual framework to explain how human behavior relates to plant patterning, drawing on case studies from around the world. Through hands-on laboratory activities, we will study aspects of plant anatomy and explore methods for the sampling and identification of plant remains, including charred seeds and wood, phytoliths, starch grains, and pollen. We will analyze paleoethnobotanical datasets using database and statistical programs to present evidence in varying formats. Final projects will involve the first-hand study of plant remains sampled from archaeological sites.

Distribution: (PBSS-AS, BIO-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Maia Dedrick (mcd225)
Full details for ARKEO 3042 : Paleoethnobotany
ARKEO 3090 Introduction to Dendrochronology

Introduction and training in dendrochronology (tree-ring dating) and its applications in archaeology, art history, climate and environment through lab work and participation in ongoing research projects using ancient to modern wood samples from around the world. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. Possibilities exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean, Mexico, and New York State.

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sturt Manning (sm456)
Full details for ARKEO 3090 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
ARKEO 3230 Humans and Animals

Human-animal relationships are often seen in utilitarian, nutritional terms, particularly in archaeology. But animals and meat have significance far beyond their economic value. This course focuses on a broad range of these non-dietary roles of animals in human societies, past and present. This includes the fundamental shift in human-animal relations associated with domestication; the varied meanings of wild and domestic animals; as well as the importance of animals as wealth, as objects of sacrifice, as totems or metaphors for humans, and as symbols in art. Meat can be used in feasting and meat sharing to create, cement, and manipulate social relationships. This course is open to students of archaeology, cultural anthropology, and other disciplines with an interest in human-animal relations.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Nerissa Russell (nr29)
Full details for ARKEO 3230 : Humans and Animals
ARKEO 3738 Identity in the Ancient World

Have you ever been asked 'who are you' or 'which group do you belong to'? You would have noted how the answer shifts according to who is asking, in which context, etc. While everyone is unique, the possible replies in any one situation are largely defined at the level of society. What is less often realized, however, is that identity shows in particular in ways of doing: what and how one eats; what one wears and when; how one moves in a space. Archaeology is in a unique position to investigate these questions, and the Greek and Roman worlds offer a fruitful test ground, both because of their varied evidence, and because of their peculiar echoing in the modern world and its manifold identities. This course will address current theories about identity and its formation, discuss the various facets of identity (e.g. gender, citizenship, ethnicity) in the Greek and Roman worlds, and introduce tools for studying identity in the past.

Distribution: (CA-AS, HST-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Astrid Van Oyen (av475)
Full details for ARKEO 3738 : Identity in the Ancient World
ARKEO 4235 Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture

Res ipsa loquitur -- the thing speaks for itself. This common expression captures a widespread belief about objects' roles in human lives, but deciphering what objects have to say is actually a complex cultural process. An object rarely has a single meaning; they are read variously in different cultural settings, and even by different individuals within a cultural system. How does one know, can one know, the meanings of an object? How are objects strategically deployed in social interaction, particularly in cross-cultural interactions where each side may have radically different understandings? How does one even know what an object is? We will explore the history and variety of ways that material culture and its meanings have been studied, using archaeological and ethnographic examples.

Distribution: (HA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Frederic Gleach (fwg1)
Full details for ARKEO 4235 : Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture
ARKEO 4250 Archaeological Research Design

This studio-style seminar provides an in-depth examination of the principles and practices of archaeological research design. We will examine all aspects of the research process, from concept formation, to methodology, to ethical practice and data management. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake a series of projects that will build incrementally into a research proposal. We will focus on developing the skills vital to designing archaeological research, starting with the formulation of a question and continuing through the exploratory process of defining proper sites, assemblages, analytical techniques, and presentation of findings. Class sessions will focus on designing research projects examining case studies drawn from world archaeology and student research projects.

Distribution: (HA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Smith (ats73)
Full details for ARKEO 4250 : Archaeological Research Design
ARKEO 4353 Sardis, A City at the Crossroads

Situated at the crossroads between the Mediterranean in the West and the Anatolian plateau in the East, Sardis successively belonged to the Lydian, Persian, Seleucid, Roman, and Byzantine empires. An urban center from at least the 7th century BCE onwards, the city developed a very particular fabric of peoples and traditions over the long time of its existence. The seminar follows the history of the site and the changing relationship of city and hinterland from the bronze age to the Byzantine period, focusing on its major civic, religious, military and funerary monuments. Debates in heritage and a critical analysis of the site's exploration and excavation in modern times, including the first expedition organized by Princeton University and the current Harvard-Cornell led excavations, form an integral part of the class. The seminar includes excursions to the Metropolitan Museum in New York and the Sardis Archive at Harvard University.

Distribution: (CA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Annetta Alexandridis (aa376)
Benjamin Anderson (bwa32)
Full details for ARKEO 4353 : Sardis, A City at the Crossroads
ARKEO 4981 Honors Thesis Research

Independent work under the close guidance of a faculty member.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Annetta Alexandridis (aa376)
Full details for ARKEO 4981 : Honors Thesis Research
ARKEO 4982 Honors Thesis Write-Up

The student, under faculty direction, will prepare a senior thesis.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Annetta Alexandridis (aa376)
Full details for ARKEO 4982 : Honors Thesis Write-Up
ARKEO 6000 Graduate Independent Study in Archaeology

Graduate students pursue advanced topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member(s).

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Annetta Alexandridis (aa376)
Full details for ARKEO 6000 : Graduate Independent Study in Archaeology
ARKEO 6042 Paleoethnobotany

This course will prepare students to identify, analyze, and interpret plant remains gathered from archaeological sites. We will build a conceptual framework to explain how human behavior relates to plant patterning, drawing on case studies from around the world. Through hands-on laboratory activities, we will study aspects of plant anatomy and explore methods for the sampling and identification of plant remains, including charred seeds and wood, phytoliths, starch grains, and pollen. We will analyze paleoethnobotanical datasets using database and statistical programs to present evidence in varying formats. Final projects will involve the first-hand study of plant remains sampled from archaeological sites.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Maia Dedrick (mcd225)
Full details for ARKEO 6042 : Paleoethnobotany
ARKEO 6100 The Craft of Archaeology

This course engages students in Archaeology and related fields in a semester-long discussion of the craft of archaeology with the faculty of the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies. Each week, a different faculty member will moderate a conversation on the professional skills vital to the modern practice of archaeological research and the tools key to professionalization. Seminar topics include developing a research project and working with museum collections to matters of pedagogy and career development.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Lori Khatchadourian (lk323)
Full details for ARKEO 6100 : The Craft of Archaeology
ARKEO 6230 Humans and Animals

Human-animal relationships are often seen in utilitarian, nutritional terms, particularly in archaeology. But animals and meat have significance far beyond their economic value. This course focuses on a broad range of these non-dietary roles of animals in human societies, past and present. This includes the fundamental shift in human-animal relations associated with domestication; the varied meanings of wild and domestic animals; as well as the importance of animals as wealth, as objects of sacrifice, as totems or metaphors for humans, and as symbols in art. Meat can be used in feasting and meat sharing to create, cement, and manipulate social relationships. This course is open to students of archaeology, cultural anthropology, and other disciplines with an interest in human-animal relations.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Nerissa Russell (nr29)
Full details for ARKEO 6230 : Humans and Animals
ARKEO 6250 Archaeological Research Design

This studio-style seminar provides an in-depth examination of the principles and practices of archaeological research design. We will examine all aspects of the research process, from concept formation, to methodology, to ethical practice and data management. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake a series of projects that will build incrementally into a research proposal. We will focus on developing the skills vital to designing archaeological research, starting with the formulation of a question and continuing through the exploratory process of defining proper sites, assemblages, analytical techniques, and presentation of findings. Class sessions will focus on designing research projects examining case studies drawn from world archaeology and student research projects.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Adam Smith (ats73)
Full details for ARKEO 6250 : Archaeological Research Design
ARKEO 6755 Archaeological Dendrochronology

An introduction to the field of Dendrochronology and associated topics with an emphasis on their applications in the field of archaeology and related heritage-buildings fields. Course aimed at graduate level with a focus on critique of scholarship in the field and work on a project as part of the course.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Sturt Manning (sm456)
Full details for ARKEO 6755 : Archaeological Dendrochronology
ARKEO 7235 Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture

Res ipsa loquitur -- the thing speaks for itself. This common expression captures a widespread belief about objects' roles in human lives, but deciphering what objects have to say is actually a complex cultural process. An object rarely has a single meaning; they are read variously in different cultural settings, and even by different individuals within a cultural system. How does one know, can one know, the meanings of an object? How are objects strategically deployed in social interaction, particularly in cross-cultural interactions where each side may have radically different understandings? How does one even know what an object is? We will explore the history and variety of ways that material culture and its meanings have been studied, using archaeological and ethnographic examples.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Frederic Gleach (fwg1)
Full details for ARKEO 7235 : Meaningful Stuff: Interpreting Material Culture
ARKEO 7353 Sardis, A City at the Crossroads

Situated at the crossroads between the Mediterranean in the West and the Anatolian plateau in the East, Sardis successively belonged to the Lydian, Persian, Seleucid, Roman, and Byzantine empires. An urban center from at least the 7th century BCE onwards, the city developed a very particular fabric of peoples and traditions over the long time of its existence. The seminar follows the history of the site and the changing relationship of city and hinterland from the bronze age to the Byzantine period, focusing on its major civic, religious, military and funerary monuments. Debates in heritage and a critical analysis of the site's exploration and excavation in modern times, including the first expedition organized by Princeton University and the current Harvard-Cornell led excavations, form an integral part of the class. The seminar includes excursions to the Metropolitan Museum in New York and the Sardis Archive at Harvard University.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Annetta Alexandridis (aa376)
Benjamin Anderson (bwa32)
Full details for ARKEO 7353 : Sardis, A City at the Crossroads
ARKEO 8902 Master's Thesis

Students, working individually with faculty member(s), prepare a master's thesis in archaeology.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Annetta Alexandridis (aa376)
Full details for ARKEO 8902 : Master's Thesis