Dalton Price: 'Some of the deepest, most personal conversations I have had with friends were at 4 a.m.'

May 7, 2020

Dalton Price

Anthropology

Port Orange, Fl

What are the most valuable skills you gained from your Arts & Sciences education?

My Arts & Sciences education taught me to think critically about some of the greatest issues we face globally, whether it be climate change or the recent surge of neoliberalism. It taught me how to adopt a humanistic lens in all of my work, thinking specifically about the human condition—at the level of the individual—and how these broader, global forces come to shape that reality. 

What is your main extracurricular activity and why is it important to you?

My main extracurricular activities are generally off-campus and take the form of internships or independent research. Among these opportunities, I appreciated my four months of work with the World Health Organization's Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office in Cairo, Egypt, the most. I worked on their antimicrobial resistance team and was able to travel throughout the Middle East and North Africa, the regional focus of our office. 

 

Dalton Price at the WHO

Dalton Price at the WHO

What Cornell memory do you treasure the most?

 

Surprisingly, I treasure the late nights doing work in Libe Cafe and the Cocktail Lounge the most. In addition to getting work done, some of the deepest, most personal conversations I have had with friends were at 4 a.m. in some of these places. It is these same friendships I will carry with me for the rest of my life. 

What have you accomplished as a Cornell student that you are most proud of, either inside the classroom or otherwise?

Being a first-generation college student, I am most proud of my academic performance and the degree I will soon obtain. This degree means so much to my family. 

What are your plans for next year?

I will begin my Ph.D. in medical anthropology at the University of Oxford. Spending my time between the U.K. and Venezuela, I will be studying the coordination of humanitarian actors and the politics of intervention in response to the political crisis that has unfolded in Venezuela throughout the last decade.


  Dalton Price