Courses - Spring 2022

ANTHR 1101 FWS: Culture, Society, and Power

This First-Year Writing Seminar is devoted to the anthropological study of the human condition. Anthropology examines all aspects of human experience, from the evolution of the species to contemporary challenges of politics, environment, and society. The discipline emphasizes empirically rich field research informed by sophisticated theoretical understandings of human social life and cultural production. The diversity of anthropology's interests provides a diverse array of stimulating opportunities to write critically about the human condition. Topics vary by semester.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Stacey Langwick (sal54)
Full details for ANTHR 1101 : FWS: Culture, Society, and Power
ANTHR 1300 Human Evolution: Genes, Behavior, and the Fossil Record

The evolution of humankind is explored through the fossil record, studies of the biological differences among current human populations, and a comparison with our closest relatives, the primates. This course investigates the roots of human biology and behavior with an evolutionary framework.

Distribution: (PBSS-AS, BIO-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 1300 : Human Evolution: Genes, Behavior, and the Fossil Record
ANTHR 1520 Tamil Conversation in Context

This course provides a basic introduction to the Tamil language.  Our focus will be on conversational usage in common social encounters, such as in the market, visiting a family's home, the bank, a place of worship, observing a common ritual, railway station, etc. We will also learn the Tamil script and basic grammatical rules of written and spoken Tamil. Learning activities will be structured in conjunction with Tamil speaking and comprehension exercises so as to make both the learning of another culture and the learning of Tamil language part of the same process of engaged learning and research.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Andrew Willford (acw24)
Full details for ANTHR 1520 : Tamil Conversation in Context
ANTHR 2201 Early Agriculture

Throughout most of the human career, people survived by hunting and gathering wild foods. The advent of food production is one of the most profound changes in history and prehistory. This course examines the current evidence for the appearance and spread of agriculture - plant and animal domestication - around the world. We will consider definitions of agriculture and domestication, the conditions under which it arises, the consequences for those who adopt it, and why it has spread over most of the world. 

Distribution: (HA-AS, GLC-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Nerissa Russell (nr29)
Full details for ANTHR 2201 : Early Agriculture
ANTHR 2285 Egyptomania? Egypt and the Greco-Roman World

This course explores the multifaceted interactions between ancient Egypt and the Classical world, from the Bronze Age to the Roman Empire. We will look at both archaeological and textual evidence (in English translation) to ask what this entangled history can tell us about life in the ancient Mediterranean. Among many other topics, we will consider Greek merchants and mercenaries in Egypt; Egyptian influences on Greek and Roman art; the famous queen Cleopatra, and her seductive but threatening reputation in Roman literature; the appearance of Egyptian underworld gods on Greek and Roman "magical gems" and curse tablets; and the ways that Greco-Roman representations of Egypt have shaped modern conceptions of Egyptian civilization, from 19th-century Romanticism to 21st-century pop culture.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Caitlin Barrett (ceb329)
Stephen Sansom (sas688)
Full details for ANTHR 2285 : Egyptomania? Egypt and the Greco-Roman World
ANTHR 2400 Cultural Diversity and Contemporary Issues

This course will introduce students to the meaning and significance of forms of cultural diversity for the understanding of contemporary issues. Drawing from films, videos, and selected readings, students will be confronted with different representational forms that portray cultures in various parts of the world, and they will be asked to examine critically their own prejudices as they influence the perception and evaluation of cultural differences. We shall approach cultures holistically, assuming the inseparability of economies, kinship, religion, and politics, as well as interconnections and dependencies between world areas such as Africa, Latin America, the West. Among the issues considered: political correctness and truth; nativism and ecological diversity; race, ethnicity, and sexuality; sin, religion, and war; global process and cultural integrity.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, GLC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Magnus Fiskesjo (nf42)
Full details for ANTHR 2400 : Cultural Diversity and Contemporary Issues
ANTHR 2440 The Social Life of Money

What is money? How do people use money in the real world? How are technological innovations changing people's perceptions of money? This course introduces anthropological perspectives on economy and society through a variety of ethnographic studies of money and finance. Topics of discussion include "primitive money" and colonial currencies, the uses of money in religious and ritual practices, social and cultural meanings of numbers, mobile money, crypto-currency and other alternative currency systems, and the social life of finance.

Distribution: (CA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Amiel Bize (abm252)
Full details for ANTHR 2440 : The Social Life of Money
ANTHR 2465 Global Heritage

Heritage typically conjures images of a glorified human past, and evokes sentiments of care for lost or endangered cultures that symbolize humanity's diversity. But heritage is also the foundation for a multi-billion dollar tourist industry and a basis for claims to national sovereignty. A closer look at heritage reveals institutions, places, and things possessed of extraordinary power. Drawing on case studies from around the world, this course attends to the complexities of heritage today. Topics include heritage ethics, tourism and the marketing of the past, approaches to preservation and management, disputed heritage and violence, heritage ideologies from nationalism to universalism, participation and inequality from the grassroots to the global, counterheritage, and the practice of public archaeology. Students apply insights gained by designing projects as heritage practitioners, engaged with heritage-scapes at Cornell and beyond.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Smith (ats73)
Full details for ANTHR 2465 : Global Heritage
ANTHR 2468 Medicine, Culture, and Society

Medicine has become the language and practice through which we address a broad range of both individual and societal complaints. Interest in this medicalization of life may be one of the reasons that medical anthropology is currently the fastest-growing subfield in anthropology. This course encourages students to examine concepts of disease, suffering, health, and well-being in their immediate experience and beyond. In the process, students will gain a working knowledge of ecological, critical, phenomenological, and applied approaches used by medical anthropologists. We will investigate what is involved in becoming a doctor, the sociality of medicines, controversies over new medical technologies, and the politics of medical knowledge. The universality of biomedicine, or hospital medicine, will not be taken for granted, but rather we will examine the plurality generated by the various political, economic, social, and ethical demands under which biomedicine has developed in different places and at different times. In addition, biomedical healing and expertise will be viewed in relation to other kinds of healing and expertise. Our readings will address medicine in North America as well as other parts of the world. In class, our discussions will return regularly to consider the broad diversity of kinds of medicine throughout the world, as well as the specific historical and local contexts of biomedicine.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Alex Nading (amn242)
Full details for ANTHR 2468 : Medicine, Culture, and Society
ANTHR 2720 From the Swampy Land: Indigenous People of the Ithaca Area

Who lived in the Ithaca area before American settlers and Cornell arrived? Where do these indigenous peoples reside today? This class explores the history and culture of the Gayogoho:no (Cayuga), which means people from the mucky land. We will read perspectives by indigenous authors, as well as archaeologists and historians, about past and current events, try to understand reasons why that history has been fragmented and distorted by more recent settlers, and delve into primary sources documenting encounters between settlers and the Gayogoho:no. We will also strive to understand the ongoing connections of the Gayogoho:no to this region despite forced dispossession and several centuries of colonialist exclusion from these lands and waters. 

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Kurt Jordan (kj21)
Full details for ANTHR 2720 : From the Swampy Land: Indigenous People of the Ithaca Area
ANTHR 2846 Magic and Witchcraft in the Greco-Roman World

This introductory course explores the roles of amulets, love potions, curse tablets, and many other magical practices in ancient Greek and Roman societies. In this course, you will learn how to invoke the powers of Abrasax, become successful and famous, get people to fall desperately in love with you, and cast horrible curses on your enemies! We will also examine a range of ancient and modern approaches to "magic" as a concept: what exactly do we mean by "magic," and how does it relate to other spheres of activity, like religion, science, and philosophy? When people (in ancient times or today) label the activities of others as "magic," what are the social and political consequences of that act? As we investigate the practices that Greeks and Romans considered "magical," we will also explore what those practices can teach us about many other aspects of life in the past, such as social class, gender, religion, and ethnic and cultural identity.

Distribution: (CA-AS, HST-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Caitlin Barrett (ceb329)
Full details for ANTHR 2846 : Magic and Witchcraft in the Greco-Roman World
ANTHR 3042 Paleoethnobotany

This course will prepare students to identify, analyze, and interpret plant remains gathered from archaeological sites. We will build a conceptual framework to explain how human behavior relates to plant patterning, drawing on case studies from around the world. Through hands-on laboratory activities, we will study aspects of plant anatomy and explore methods for the sampling and identification of plant remains, including charred seeds and wood, phytoliths, starch grains, and pollen. We will analyze paleoethnobotanical datasets using database and statistical programs to present evidence in varying formats. Final projects will involve the first-hand study of plant remains sampled from archaeological sites.

Distribution: (PBSS-AS, BIO-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Maia Dedrick (mcd225)
Full details for ANTHR 3042 : Paleoethnobotany
ANTHR 3235 Bioarchaeology

Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.  

Distribution: (PBSS-AS, BIO-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Matthew Velasco (mcv47)
Full details for ANTHR 3235 : Bioarchaeology
ANTHR 3245 Across the Seas: Contacts between the Americas and the Old World Before Columbus

This course considers the possibility of connections between the America and the Old World before the Spanish discovery not only as an empirical question, but also as an intensely controversial issue that has tested the limits of the scholarly detachment that archaeologists imagine characterizes their perspectives. We will consider the evidence for several possible episodes of interaction as well as the broader issue of how long-distance interaction can be recognized in the archaeological record.  Transoceanic contact is a common element in popular visions of the American past, but most professional archaeologists have rejected the possibility with great vehemence.  The issue provides an interesting case study in the power of orthodoxy in archaeology.

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: John Henderson (jsh6)
Full details for ANTHR 3245 : Across the Seas: Contacts between the Americas and the Old World Before Columbus
ANTHR 3255 Ancient Mexico and Central America

An introduction to ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the nature and development of societies that are arguably the most complex to develop anywhere in the precolumbian Americas.  The course provides a summary of the history of the region before the European invasion, but the emphasis is on the organization of Mesoamerican societies: the distinctive features of Mesoamerican cities, economies, political systems, religion.  We begin by considering Mesoamerican societies at the time of the Spanish invasion.  Our focus will be on descriptions of the Aztecs of Central Mexico by Europeans and indigenous survivors, in an attempt to extract from them a model of the fundamental organizational features of one Mesoamerican society, making allowances for what we can determine about the perspectives and biases of their authors.  We then review the precolumbian history of Mesoamerica looking for variations on these themes as well as indications of alternative forms of organization.  We will also look at such issues as the transition from mobile to sedentary lifeways, the processes involved in the domestication of plants and animals, the emergence of cities and states, and the use of invasion-period and ethnographic information to interpret precolumbian societies in comparative perspective.

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: John Henderson (jsh6)
Full details for ANTHR 3255 : Ancient Mexico and Central America
ANTHR 3325 Food and Work

This course will explore key topics in the critical study of labor and capitalism through the lens of food. Questions of race, gender, and class, but also toxicity, settler colonialism, as well as production and reproduction can all be read in the landscapes of food provision and procurement. Food is the ground for an array of labor processes—planting, harvesting, transporting, serving, and eating, just to name a few. Some of these forms of work are overt (stooped workers toiling in pesticide ridden field, for example). But some of these forms of work are invisible and unpaid. And sometimes, they are incredibly well remunerated but totally shadowy. By studying these different forms of work comparatively, we can understand genealogies and futures of inequality, resource use, and the nature of work itself. 

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sarah Besky (sb2626)
Full details for ANTHR 3325 : Food and Work
ANTHR 3390 Primate Behavior and Ecology with Emphasis on African Apes

The course will investigate all aspects of non-human primate life. Based on the fundamentals of evolutionary theory, group and inter-individual behaviors will be presented. In addition, an understanding of group structure and breeding systems will be reached through an evaluation of ecological constraints imposed on primates in different habitats. Subjects include: primate taxonomy, diet and foraging, predation, cooperation and competition, social ontogeny, kinship, and mating strategies.

Distribution: (PBSS-AS, BIO-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 3390 : Primate Behavior and Ecology with Emphasis on African Apes
ANTHR 3405 Multicultural Issues in Education

This course explores research on race, ethnicity and language in American education. It examines historical and current patterns of school achievement for minoritized youths. It also examines the cultural and social premises undergirding educational practices in diverse communities and schools. Policies, programs and pedagogy, including multicultural and bilingual education, are explored.

Distribution: (CA-AS, SCD-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sofia Villenas (sav33)
Full details for ANTHR 3405 : Multicultural Issues in Education
ANTHR 3487 Racial Capitalism

This course introduces students to a tradition of radical scholarship on the articulations of race and racism with capitalism, and uses it as a frame through which to examine the ongoing role of racialized difference in structuring capitalist extraction. Beginning with chattel slavery's role in the origins of capitalism and moving into contemporary settings, the course will examine how capitalism produces race, how race shapes the accumulation of wealth, and what the role of an "activist" scholarship is in making these links visible. Readings will include the work of Black radical scholars as well as historical and ethnographic studies of the U.S. and global contexts—including discussions of plantation slavery, carceral capitalism, the 2008 mortgage crisis, and global labor migration.

Distribution: (CA-AS, SCD-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Amiel Bize (abm252)
Full details for ANTHR 3487 : Racial Capitalism
ANTHR 3703 Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective

The common perception of ethnicity is that it is a natural and an inevitable consequence of cultural difference. Asians overseas, in particular, have won repute as a people who cling tenaciously to their culture and refuse to assimilate into their host societies and cultures. But, who are the Asians? On what basis can we label Asians an ethnic group? Although there is a significant Asian presence in the Caribbean, the category Asian itself does not exist in the Caribbean. What does this say about the nature of categories that label and demarcate groups of people on the basis of alleged cultural and phenotypical characteristics? This course will examine the dynamics behind group identity, namely ethnicity, by comparing and contrasting the multicultural experience of Asian populations in the Caribbean and the United States. Ethnographic case studies will focus on the East Indian and Chinese experiences in the Caribbean and the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipino, and Indian experiences in the United States.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Viranjini Munasinghe (vpm1)
Full details for ANTHR 3703 : Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective
ANTHR 3950 Humanities Scholars Research Methods

This course explores the practice, theory, and methodology of humanities research, critical analysis, and communication through writing and oral presentation. We will study the work and impact of humanists (scholars of literature, history, theory, art, visual studies, film, anthropology, gender and sexuality studies), who pose big questions about the human condition. By reading and analyzing their scholarship—critiquing them and engaging their ideas—we will craft our own methods and voices. Students will refine their research methods (library research, note taking, organizing material, bibliographies, citation methods, proposals, outlines, etc.) and design their own independent research project. Students enrolled in this seminar will have the opportunity to participate in the Humanities Scholars Program.

Distribution: (CA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Durba Ghosh (dg256)
Full details for ANTHR 3950 : Humanities Scholars Research Methods
ANTHR 4222 Archaeological Ethics

What is the role of ethics in archaeology today? What principles shape the discipline's response to serious dilemmas? What is the relationship between ethics and politics in archaeology? This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of these questions across a range of subfields, from indigenous, public, and postcolonial archaeologies, to critical heritage studies, conflict archaeology and the archaeology of the contemporary past. We will learn the normative ethics of Western archaeology, with its concern for best practices, multiculturalism, and the politics of identity, as well as radical alternatives centered on hard politics, oppression, and justice. We will also explore the ethics of the profession, as it pertains to equity and inclusion. This course traverses the terrain of moral right and wrong in archaeology.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Lori Khatchadourian (lk323)
Full details for ANTHR 4222 : Archaeological Ethics
ANTHR 4240 Collecting Culture: Museums and Anthropology

Ethnographic and archaeological objects are widely collected, by individuals and by institutions. This course will explore the history and processes of museums and collecting, and issues around working with collections. We will work with materials in the Anthropology Collections, and also draw on other resources on campus and in the area to experience a variety of ways that museums and collections are organized, maintained, conceptualized and presented. We also will consider challenges to collecting, such as its implication in nationalist and imperialist agendas, the problems of archaeological looting and ethnographic appropriation, and indigenous expectations and demands for inclusion in such activities.

Distribution: (CA-AS, ALC-AS, GLC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Frederic Gleach (fwg1)
Full details for ANTHR 4240 : Collecting Culture: Museums and Anthropology
ANTHR 4250 Archaeological Research Design

This studio-style seminar provides an in-depth examination of the principles and practices of archaeological research design. We will examine all aspects of the research process, from concept formation, to methodology, to ethical practice and data management. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake a series of projects that will build incrementally into a research proposal. We will focus on developing the skills vital to designing archaeological research, starting with the formulation of a question and continuing through the exploratory process of defining proper sites, assemblages, analytical techniques, and presentation of findings. Class sessions will focus on designing research projects examining case studies drawn from world archaeology and student research projects.

Distribution: (HA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Smith (ats73)
Full details for ANTHR 4250 : Archaeological Research Design
ANTHR 4264 Zooarchaeological Interpretation

This course follows from last semester's Zooarchaeological Method.  We will shift our emphasis here from basic skills to interpretation, although you will continue to work with archaeological bones.  We will begin by examining topics surrounding the basic interpretation of raw faunal data: sampling, quantification, taphonomy, seasonality.  We will then explore how to use faunal data to reconstruct subsistence patterns, social structure, and human-animal relations.

Distribution: (PBSS-AS, BIO-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Nerissa Russell (nr29)
Full details for ANTHR 4264 : Zooarchaeological Interpretation
ANTHR 4401 Advanced Documentary Production

This production seminar is for students with basic documentary filmmaking skills who want to work with previously collected footage and/or are in production on a project in or around Ithaca. Over the course of the semester, students complete a documentary film based on an immersive engagement with their selected subject matter. Alongside watching and discussing relevant texts and films, students will complete exercises to help them focus their projects, build a cohesive narrative, learn script writing, brainstorm scene ideas, overcome narrative challenges, discover their aesthetic, and develop a film circulation plan. Students will regularly present new footage and scenes and explain their work in terms their goals for the final project. The course culminates in a public screening of students' independent video projects.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Natasha Raheja (nr446)
Full details for ANTHR 4401 : Advanced Documentary Production
ANTHR 4437 Ethnographies of Development

This seminar develops an ethnographic approach to projects aiming to improve the human condition. Our object of study - development, humanitarianism, and the will to improve - is defined capaciously to allow for the study of projects ranging in orientation from politically conservative to progressive and revolutionary; from religious to secular; and from the global South to the global North. Whether we are studying construction megaprojects or hygiene lessons, programs for preserving tradition or introducing modernity, climate change mitigation efforts or truth commissions, we will explore ethnographically the actors, targets, explicit motives, practical techniques, and intended and unintended consequences. Our aim will be to link the micropolitics of lived experience and intersubjective relations to the macropolitics that structure and enable improvement projects.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Marina Welker (maw82)
Full details for ANTHR 4437 : Ethnographies of Development
ANTHR 4470 Race and Justice After DNA

DNA has become a pervasive feature of our lives, and a critical object through which race and justice are imagined and contested. DNA shapes how we think about ancestral pasts, medical futures, identity, citizenship and belonging, and standards of evidence. This course considers how each of these concepts articulates with DNA, investigating each in turn as a form of genetic afterlives that reconfigures race, justice, and the relationship between them. For longer description and instructor bio, visit the Society for the Humanities website.

Distribution: (CA-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Noah Tamarkin (nt383)
Full details for ANTHR 4470 : Race and Justice After DNA
ANTHR 4478 Taboo and Pollution

This course is an in-depth introduction to the study of taboo, dirt, and cleanliness. The core concern is the relation between taboo and subjectivity, the making of persons and communities. We'll examine a range of actual examples from around the world, including taboos around sexuality, hair, and blood; food taboos, and other taboos governing religious practices; disgust, fear, and avoidance; modern and contemporary conceptions of hygiene, filth, and waste treatment; as well as the ideas underlying racism and social purity, built on the logic of taboo. We'll survey and discuss a wealth of writings, including the latest attempts to re-think and understand the classic topic of taboo. This is mainly through anthropologists such as Valeri, Douglas, Steiner, and others, and through crucial contributions from psychology and literary studies, with Freud, Kristeva, and others. Students will engage in research and writing, including on their own personal experiences.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, ETM-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Magnus Fiskesjo (nf42)
Full details for ANTHR 4478 : Taboo and Pollution
ANTHR 4520 Society and Culture in the Nilgiris: Engaged Research in Rural South India

Explores the interpretive and analytic tools made available through the ethnographic analysis of the societies within the Nilgiris Biosphere Reserve. Through anthropological understandings of culture as the primary human adaptation, we assess the possibility of understanding the lives of others, particularly in critical juxtaposition to multiple and alternate theories of the self and/or person as understood in different cultures. In this case, we examine relationships between culture and the environment (social and physical), focusing upon unique patterns and adaptations that have developed within particular Nilgiri societies. In doing so, we also examine debates in the anthropology of emotion, cognition, healing, development, the body and health. To this end, we bring into sharper focus the particular theoretical and empirical contributions (and/or limits) of anthropologists towards developing a cross-cultural understanding of human nature and social processes.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Andrew Willford (acw24)
Full details for ANTHR 4520 : Society and Culture in the Nilgiris: Engaged Research in Rural South India
ANTHR 4725 American Indian Lands and Sovereignties

The relationship between North American Indian peoples and the states of Canada and the US is in many ways unique, a product of centuries of trade compacts, treaties, legislation, warfare, land claim negotiations, and Supreme Court decisions. Apparently straightforward concepts such as "land," "property," and "sovereignty," based as they are on European cultural assumptions, often seem inadequate for making sense of the cross-cultural terrain of Indian-State relations, where they tend to take on new – and often ambiguous – meanings. In this course we will explore some of these ambiguous meanings, attending to the cultural realities they reflect and the social relationships they shape. Then we will examine the complex interplay of legal, political, and cultural forces by taking an in-depth look at several selected case studies.

Distribution: (CA-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Paul Nadasdy (pn79)
Full details for ANTHR 4725 : American Indian Lands and Sovereignties
ANTHR 4910 Independent Study: Undergrad I

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 4910 : Independent Study: Undergrad I
ANTHR 4920 Independent Study: Undergrad II

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 4920 : Independent Study: Undergrad II
ANTHR 4984 Honors Thesis Write-Up

Final write-up of the thesis under the direct supervision of the thesis advisor, who will assign the grade for this course.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 4984 : Honors Thesis Write-Up
ANTHR 4992 Honors Workshop II

Course will consist of weekly, seminar-style meetings of all thesis writers until mid-semester, under the direction of the honors chair. This second semester concentrates on preparation of a full draft of the thesis by mid-semester, with ample time left for revisions prior to submission. Group meetings will concentrate on collective reviewing of the work of other students, presentation of research, and the like.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sofia Villenas (sav33)
Full details for ANTHR 4992 : Honors Workshop II
ANTHR 6025 Proseminar in Anthropology

This course explores advanced topics in anthropological theory and practice. It builds on the history of the discipline that students will have examined in the preceding course ANTHR 6020, and seeks to immerse students in major contemporary theoretical developments and debates and the discipline's most pressing concerns. Coursework will proceed mainly by way of reading, writing, and discussion.  

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Viranjini Munasinghe (vpm1)
Full details for ANTHR 6025 : Proseminar in Anthropology
ANTHR 6042 Paleoethnobotany

This course will prepare students to identify, analyze, and interpret plant remains gathered from archaeological sites. We will build a conceptual framework to explain how human behavior relates to plant patterning, drawing on case studies from around the world. Through hands-on laboratory activities, we will study aspects of plant anatomy and explore methods for the sampling and identification of plant remains, including charred seeds and wood, phytoliths, starch grains, and pollen. We will analyze paleoethnobotanical datasets using database and statistical programs to present evidence in varying formats. Final projects will involve the first-hand study of plant remains sampled from archaeological sites.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Maia Dedrick (mcd225)
Full details for ANTHR 6042 : Paleoethnobotany
ANTHR 6101 Sense, Movement, Sociality

This course begins from the premise that bodies and sensing are the ground of sociality. Drawing on texts from Anthropology, Science & Technology Studies, Disability Studies, and Animal Studies, as well as some classics of social theory, this course brings bodies and senses to the fore in thinking about how humans live, work, relate, and create together. It considers all the senses from "the big five" (sight, hearing, touch, smell, taste) to the "hidden senses" (balance, kinesthesia, proprioception, and affect). The goal is to read and think materially, semiotically, and theoretically about how humans, as a social species, interact with our own and other species through our bodies, our senses, and our movements.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Rachel Prentice (rep35)
Full details for ANTHR 6101 : Sense, Movement, Sociality
ANTHR 6102 Political Culture

This course will explore the relationship between popular belief, political action, and the institutional deployment of social power. The class will be roughly divided in three parts, opening with a discussion of how the material world influences the culture of a society. The middle section will connect culture to political ideology, including symbolism and the construction of group identity. The last part of the course will consider ways in which cultural symbols and ideology can be manipulated in order to legitimate government authority. We will then, coming full circle, trace how political regimes can influence the social practices from which culture originates.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Richard Bensel (rfb2)
Full details for ANTHR 6102 : Political Culture
ANTHR 6235 Bioarchaeology

Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Matthew Velasco (mcv47)
Full details for ANTHR 6235 : Bioarchaeology
ANTHR 6245 Across the Seas: Contacts between the Americas and the Old World Before Columbus

This course considers the possibility of connections between the America and the Old World before the Spanish discovery not only as an empirical question, but also as an intensely controversial issue that has tested the limits of the scholarly detachment that archaeologists imagine characterizes their perspectives. We will consider the evidence for several possible episodes of interaction as well as the broader issue of how long-distance interaction can be recognized in the archaeological record.  Transoceanic contact is a common element in popular visions of the American past, but most professional archaeologists have rejected the possibility with great vehemence.  The issue provides an interesting case study in the power of orthodoxy in archaeology.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: John Henderson (jsh6)
Full details for ANTHR 6245 : Across the Seas: Contacts between the Americas and the Old World Before Columbus
ANTHR 6250 Archaeological Research Design

This studio-style seminar provides an in-depth examination of the principles and practices of archaeological research design. We will examine all aspects of the research process, from concept formation, to methodology, to ethical practice and data management. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake a series of projects that will build incrementally into a research proposal. We will focus on developing the skills vital to designing archaeological research, starting with the formulation of a question and continuing through the exploratory process of defining proper sites, assemblages, analytical techniques, and presentation of findings. Class sessions will focus on designing research projects examining case studies drawn from world archaeology and student research projects.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Adam Smith (ats73)
Full details for ANTHR 6250 : Archaeological Research Design
ANTHR 6255 Ancient Mexico and Central America

An introduction to ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the nature and development of societies that are arguably the most complex to develop anywhere in the precolumbian Americas. The course provides a summary of the history of the region before the European invasion, but the emphasis is on the organization of Mesoamerican societies: the distinctive features of Mesoamerican cities, economies, political systems, religion. We begin by considering Mesoamerican societies at the time of the Spanish invasion. Our focus will be on descriptions of the Aztecs of Central Mexico by Europeans and indigenous survivors, in an attempt to extract from them a model of the fundamental organizational features of one Mesoamerican society, making allowances for what we can determine about the perspectives and biases of their authors. We then review the precolumbian history of Mesoamerica looking for variations on these themes as well as indications of alternative forms of organization. We will also look at such issues as the transition from mobile to sedentary lifeways, the processes involved in the domestication of plants and animals, the emergence of cities and states, and the use of invasion-period and ethnographic information to interpret precolumbian societies in comparative perspective.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: John Henderson (jsh6)
Full details for ANTHR 6255 : Ancient Mexico and Central America
ANTHR 6440 Proposal Development

This seminar focuses on preparing a full-scale proposal for anthropological fieldwork for a dissertation. Topics include identifying appropriate funding sources; defining a researchable problem; selecting and justifying a particular fieldwork site; situating the ethnographic case within appropriate theoretical contexts; selecting and justifying appropriate research methodologies; developing a feasible timetable for field research; ethical considerations and human subjects protection procedures; and preparing appropriate budgets. This is a writing seminar, and students will complete a proposal suitable for submission to a major funding agency in the social sciences.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Marina Welker (maw82)
Full details for ANTHR 6440 : Proposal Development
ANTHR 6487 Racial Capitalism

This course introduces students to a tradition of radical scholarship on the articulations of race and racism with capitalism, and uses it as a frame through which to examine the ongoing role of racialized difference in structuring capitalist extraction. Beginning with chattel slavery's role in the origins of capitalism and moving into contemporary settings, the course will examine how capitalism produces race, how race shapes the accumulation of wealth, and what the role of an "activist" scholarship is in making these links visible. Readings will include the work of Black radical scholars as well as historical and ethnographic studies of the U.S. and global contexts—including discussions of plantation slavery, carceral capitalism, the 2008 mortgage crisis, and global labor migration.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Amiel Bize (abm252)
Full details for ANTHR 6487 : Racial Capitalism
ANTHR 6703 Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective

For description, see ANTHR 6703.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Viranjini Munasinghe (vpm1)
Full details for ANTHR 6703 : Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective
ANTHR 7222 Archaeological Ethics

What is the role of ethics in archaeology today? What principles shape the discipline's response to serious dilemmas? What is the relationship between ethics and politics in archaeology? This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of these questions across a range of subfields, from indigenous, public, and postcolonial archaeologies, to critical heritage studies, conflict archaeology and the archaeology of the contemporary past. We will learn the normative ethics of Western archaeology, with its concern for best practices, multiculturalism, and the politics of identity, as well as radical alternatives centered on hard politics, oppression, and justice. We will also explore the ethics of the profession, as it pertains to equity and inclusion. This course traverses the terrain of moral right and wrong in archaeology.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Lori Khatchadourian (lk323)
Full details for ANTHR 7222 : Archaeological Ethics
ANTHR 7240 Collecting Culture: Museums and Anthropology

Ethnographic and archaeological objects are widely collected, by individuals and by institutions. This course will explore the history and processes of museums and collecting, and issues around working with collections. We will work with materials in the Anthropology Collections, and also draw on other resources on campus and in the area to experience a variety of ways that museums and collections are organized, maintained, conceptualized and presented. We also will consider challenges to collecting, such as its implication in nationalist and imperialist agendas, the problems of archaeological looting and ethnographic appropriation, and indigenous expectations and demands for inclusion in such activities.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Frederic Gleach (fwg1)
Full details for ANTHR 7240 : Collecting Culture: Museums and Anthropology
ANTHR 7264 Zooarchaeological Interpretation

This course follows from last semester's Zooarchaeological Method.  We will shift our emphasis here from basic skills to interpretation, although you will continue to work with archaeological bones.  We will begin by examining topics surrounding the basic interpretation of raw faunal data: sampling, quantification, taphonomy, seasonality.  We will then explore how to use faunal data to reconstruct subsistence patterns, social structure, and human-animal relations.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Nerissa Russell (nr29)
Full details for ANTHR 7264 : Zooarchaeological Interpretation
ANTHR 7401 Advanced Documentary Production

This production seminar is for students with basic documentary filmmaking skills who want to work with previously collected footage and/or are in production on a project in or around Ithaca. Over the course of the semester, students complete a documentary film based on an immersive engagement with their selected subject matter. Alongside watching and discussing relevant texts and films, students will complete exercises to help them focus their projects, build a cohesive narrative, learn script writing, brainstorm scene ideas, overcome narrative challenges, discover their aesthetic, and develop a film circulation plan. Students will regularly present new footage and scenes and explain their work in terms their goals for the final project. The course culminates in a public screening of students' independent video projects.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Natasha Raheja (nr446)
Full details for ANTHR 7401 : Advanced Documentary Production
ANTHR 7437 Ethnographies of Development

This seminar develops an ethnographic approach to projects aiming to improve the human condition. Our object of study - development, humanitarianism, and the will to improve - is defined capaciously to allow for the study of projects ranging in orientation from politically conservative to progressive and revolutionary; from religious to secular; and from the global South to the global North. Whether we are studying construction megaprojects or hygiene lessons, programs for preserving tradition or introducing modernity, climate change mitigation efforts or truth commissions, we will explore ethnographically the actors, targets, explicit motives, practical techniques, and intended and unintended consequences. Our aim will be to link the micropolitics of lived experience and intersubjective relations to the macropolitics that structure and enable improvement projects.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Marina Welker (maw82)
Full details for ANTHR 7437 : Ethnographies of Development
ANTHR 7470 Race and Justice After DNA

DNA has become a pervasive feature of our lives, and a critical object through which race and justice are imagined and contested. DNA shapes how we think about ancestral pasts, medical futures, identity, citizenship and belonging, and standards of evidence. This course considers how each of these concepts articulates with DNA, investigating each in turn as a form of genetic afterlives that reconfigures race, justice, and the relationship between them. For longer description and instructor bio, visit the Society for the Humanities website.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Noah Tamarkin (nt383)
Full details for ANTHR 7470 : Race and Justice After DNA
ANTHR 7478 Taboo and Pollution

This course is an in-depth introduction to the study of taboo, dirt, and cleanliness. The core concern is the relation between taboo and subjectivity, the making of persons and communities. We'll examine a range of actual examples from around the world, including taboos around sexuality, hair, and blood; food taboos, and other taboos governing religious practices; disgust, fear, and avoidance; modern and contemporary conceptions of hygiene, filth, and waste treatment; as well as the ideas underlying racism and social purity, built on the logic of taboo. We'll survey and discuss a wealth of writings, including the latest attempts to re-think and understand the classic topic of taboo. This is mainly through anthropologists such as Valeri, Douglas, Steiner, and others, and through crucial contributions from psychology and literary studies, with Freud, Kristeva, and others. Students will engage in research and writing, including on their own personal experiences.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Magnus Fiskesjo (nf42)
Full details for ANTHR 7478 : Taboo and Pollution
ANTHR 7520 Southeast Asia: Readings in Special Problems

Independent reading course on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Magnus Fiskesjo (nf42)
Full details for ANTHR 7520 : Southeast Asia: Readings in Special Problems
ANTHR 7530 South Asia: Readings in Special Problems

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: David Holmberg (dhh8)
Full details for ANTHR 7530 : South Asia: Readings in Special Problems
ANTHR 7540 Problems in Himalayan Studies
Academic Career: GR Instructor: David Holmberg (dhh8)
Full details for ANTHR 7540 : Problems in Himalayan Studies
ANTHR 7550 East Asia: Readings in Special Problems

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: GR Full details for ANTHR 7550 : East Asia: Readings in Special Problems
ANTHR 7725 American Indian Lands and Sovereignties

The relationship between North American Indian peoples and the states of Canada and the US is in many ways unique, a product of centuries of trade compacts, treaties, legislation, warfare, land claim negotiations, and Supreme Court decisions. Apparently straightforward concepts such as "land," "property," and "sovereignty," based as they are on European cultural assumptions, often seem inadequate for making sense of the cross-cultural terrain of Indian-State relations, where they tend to take on new – and often ambiguous – meanings. In this course we will explore some of these ambiguous meanings, attending to the cultural realities they reflect and the social relationships they shape. Then we will examine the complex interplay of legal, political, and cultural forces by taking an in-depth look at several selected case studies.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Paul Nadasdy (pn79)
Full details for ANTHR 7725 : American Indian Lands and Sovereignties
ANTHR 7900 Department of Anthropology Colloquium

A series of workshops and lectures on a range of themes in the discipline sponsored by the Department of Anthropology. Presentations include lectures by invited speakers, debates featuring prominent anthropologists from across the globe, and works in progress presented by anthropology faculty and graduate students.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Stacey Langwick (sal54)
Full details for ANTHR 7900 : Department of Anthropology Colloquium
ANTHR 7910 Independent Study: Grad I

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 7910 : Independent Study: Grad I
ANTHR 7920 Independent Study: Grad II

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 7920 : Independent Study: Grad II
ANTHR 7930 Independent Study: Grad III

Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Adam Arcadi (apc13)
Full details for ANTHR 7930 : Independent Study: Grad III
ARKEO 2201 Early Agriculture

Throughout most of the human career, people survived by hunting and gathering wild foods. The advent of food production is one of the most profound changes in history and prehistory. This course examines the current evidence for the appearance and spread of agriculture - plant and animal domestication - around the world. We will consider definitions of agriculture and domestication, the conditions under which it arises, the consequences for those who adopt it, and why it has spread over most of the world. 

Distribution: (HA-AS, GLC-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Nerissa Russell (nr29)
Full details for ARKEO 2201 : Early Agriculture
ARKEO 2271 The Aegean and East Mediterranean Bronze Age c. 3000-1000 BCE

An exploration of the archaeology and art of the Aegean region and of its neighbors during the Bronze Age, ca. 3000-1000 BCE: the origins and precursors of the Classical World. The course will investigate the emergence of the first complex societies in the Aegean region in the third millennium BCE, and then the development and story of the Minoan and Mycenaean worlds and their neighbors in the second millennium BCE. Topics will include: the Early Bronze Age and the first complex societies in the Aegean (Cyclades, Crete, Greece, Anatolia); the collapse and reorientation around 2200BCE and links with climate change; the first palace civilization of (Minoan) Crete; the Santorini (Thera) volcanic eruption and its historical impact in the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean; the rise of the Mycenaean Greek palaces and the shift into proto-history; the development of an international east Mediterranean trade system; Ahhiyawa and the Hittites; the 'Trojan War'; and the collapse of the Late Bronze Age societies and links with climate change.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sturt Manning (sm456)
Full details for ARKEO 2271 : The Aegean and East Mediterranean Bronze Age c. 3000-1000 BCE
ARKEO 2285 Egyptomania? Egypt and the Greco-Roman World

This course explores the multifaceted interactions between ancient Egypt and the Classical world, from the Bronze Age to the Roman Empire. We will look at both archaeological and textual evidence (in English translation) to ask what this entangled history can tell us about life in the ancient Mediterranean. Among many other topics, we will consider Greek merchants and mercenaries in Egypt; Egyptian influences on Greek and Roman art; the famous queen Cleopatra, and her seductive but threatening reputation in Roman literature; the appearance of Egyptian underworld gods on Greek and Roman "magical gems" and curse tablets; and the ways that Greco-Roman representations of Egypt have shaped modern conceptions of Egyptian civilization, from 19th-century Romanticism to 21st-century pop culture.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Caitlin Barrett (ceb329)
Stephen Sansom (sas688)
Full details for ARKEO 2285 : Egyptomania? Egypt and the Greco-Roman World
ARKEO 2465 Global Heritage

Heritage typically conjures images of a glorified human past, and evokes sentiments of care for lost or endangered cultures that symbolize humanity's diversity. But heritage is also the foundation for a multi-billion dollar tourist industry and a basis for claims to national sovereignty. A closer look at heritage reveals institutions, places, and things possessed of extraordinary power. Drawing on case studies from around the world, this course attends to the complexities of heritage today. Topics include heritage ethics, tourism and the marketing of the past, approaches to preservation and management, disputed heritage and violence, heritage ideologies from nationalism to universalism, participation and inequality from the grassroots to the global, counterheritage, and the practice of public archaeology. Students apply insights gained by designing projects as heritage practitioners, engaged with heritage-scapes at Cornell and beyond.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Smith (ats73)
Full details for ARKEO 2465 : Global Heritage
ARKEO 2668 Ancient Egyptian Civilization

The course surveys the history and culture of pharaonic Egypt from its prehistoric origins down to the early first millennium bce. Within a chronological framework, the following themes or topics will be considered: the development of the Egyptian state (monarchy, administration, ideology), social organization (class, gender and family, slavery), economic factors, and empire and international relations.

Distribution: (HA-AS, ALC-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Christopher Monroe (cmm253)
Full details for ARKEO 2668 : Ancient Egyptian Civilization
ARKEO 2712 The Ancient Economy

Ancient economies were very different to our modern economy: there were no banks, transport and communication were difficult, and the discipline of economics did not yet exist. Yet there are also striking similarities between the ancient and modern economic worlds: many people liked luxuries, production was increasingly standardized, and buyers and sellers came together on market days. This course introduces the key characteristics of ancient economies, with a focus on ancient Rome but also looking at classical Athens and further afield. It is structured around themes such as trade and exchange, craft, consumption, and money. Its aim is to probe the nature of the ancient economy, both for students interested in the ancient world and for students keen to put the modern economy in historical perspective.

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Astrid Van Oyen (av475)
Full details for ARKEO 2712 : The Ancient Economy
ARKEO 2720 From the Swampy Land: Indigenous People of the Ithaca Area

Who lived in the Ithaca area before American settlers and Cornell arrived? Where do these indigenous peoples reside today? This class explores the history and culture of the Gayogoho:no (Cayuga), which means people from the mucky land. We will read perspectives by indigenous authors, as well as archaeologists and historians, about past and current events, try to understand reasons why that history has been fragmented and distorted by more recent settlers, and delve into primary sources documenting encounters between settlers and the Gayogoho:no. We will also strive to understand the ongoing connections of the Gayogoho:no to this region despite forced dispossession and several centuries of colonialist exclusion from these lands and waters. 

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Kurt Jordan (kj21)
Full details for ARKEO 2720 : From the Swampy Land: Indigenous People of the Ithaca Area
ARKEO 2812 Hieroglyphs to HTML: History of Writing

An introduction to the history and theory of writing systems from cuneiform to the alphabet, historical and new writing media, and the complex relationship of writing technologies to human language and culture. Through hands-on activities and collaborative work, students will explore the shifting definitions of "writing" and the diverse ways in which cultures through time have developed and used writing systems. We will also investigate the traditional divisions of "oral" vs. "written" and consider how digital technologies have affected how we use and think about writing in encoding systems from Morse code to emoji.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Athena Kirk (aek238)
Full details for ARKEO 2812 : Hieroglyphs to HTML: History of Writing
ARKEO 2846 Magic and Witchcraft in the Greco-Roman World

This introductory course explores the roles of amulets, love potions, curse tablets, and many other magical practices in ancient Greek and Roman societies. In this course, you will learn how to invoke the powers of Abrasax, become successful and famous, get people to fall desperately in love with you, and cast horrible curses on your enemies! We will also examine a range of ancient and modern approaches to "magic" as a concept: what exactly do we mean by "magic," and how does it relate to other spheres of activity, like religion, science, and philosophy? When people (in ancient times or today) label the activities of others as "magic," what are the social and political consequences of that act? As we investigate the practices that Greeks and Romans considered "magical," we will also explore what those practices can teach us about many other aspects of life in the past, such as social class, gender, religion, and ethnic and cultural identity.

Distribution: (CA-AS, HST-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Caitlin Barrett (ceb329)
Full details for ARKEO 2846 : Magic and Witchcraft in the Greco-Roman World
ARKEO 3000 Undergraduate Independent Study in Archaeology and Related Fields

Undergraduate students pursue topics of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Annetta Alexandridis (aa376)
Full details for ARKEO 3000 : Undergraduate Independent Study in Archaeology and Related Fields
ARKEO 3042 Paleoethnobotany

This course will prepare students to identify, analyze, and interpret plant remains gathered from archaeological sites. We will build a conceptual framework to explain how human behavior relates to plant patterning, drawing on case studies from around the world. Through hands-on laboratory activities, we will study aspects of plant anatomy and explore methods for the sampling and identification of plant remains, including charred seeds and wood, phytoliths, starch grains, and pollen. We will analyze paleoethnobotanical datasets using database and statistical programs to present evidence in varying formats. Final projects will involve the first-hand study of plant remains sampled from archaeological sites.

Distribution: (PBSS-AS, BIO-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Maia Dedrick (mcd225)
Full details for ARKEO 3042 : Paleoethnobotany
ARKEO 3225 Archaic and Classical Greece

This lecture class centers on the formative periods of ancient Greek culture, the centuries from about 800-300 BCE. Its aim is to place Greece within the cosmopolitan networks of the Mediterranean and beyond, while simultaneously looking at specific local traditions. Only within this complex "glocal" frame will it become clear what is unique about Greek art.

Distribution: (CA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Annetta Alexandridis (aa376)
Full details for ARKEO 3225 : Archaic and Classical Greece
ARKEO 3235 Bioarchaeology

Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.  

Distribution: (PBSS-AS, BIO-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Matthew Velasco (mcv47)
Full details for ARKEO 3235 : Bioarchaeology
ARKEO 3245 Across the Seas: Contacts between the Americas and the Old World Before Columbus

This course considers the possibility of connections between the America and the Old World before the Spanish discovery not only as an empirical question, but also as an intensely controversial issue that has tested the limits of the scholarly detachment that archaeologists imagine characterizes their perspectives. We will consider the evidence for several possible episodes of interaction as well as the broader issue of how long-distance interaction can be recognized in the archaeological record.  Transoceanic contact is a common element in popular visions of the American past, but most professional archaeologists have rejected the possibility with great vehemence.  The issue provides an interesting case study in the power of orthodoxy in archaeology.

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: John Henderson (jsh6)
Full details for ARKEO 3245 : Across the Seas: Contacts between the Americas and the Old World Before Columbus
ARKEO 3255 Ancient Mexico and Central America

An introduction to ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the nature and development of societies that are arguably the most complex to develop anywhere in the precolumbian Americas.  The course provides a summary of the history of the region before the European invasion, but the emphasis is on the organization of Mesoamerican societies: the distinctive features of Mesoamerican cities, economies, political systems, religion.  We begin by considering Mesoamerican societies at the time of the Spanish invasion.  Our focus will be on descriptions of the Aztecs of Central Mexico by Europeans and indigenous survivors, in an attempt to extract from them a model of the fundamental organizational features of one Mesoamerican society, making allowances for what we can determine about the perspectives and biases of their authors.  We then review the precolumbian history of Mesoamerica looking for variations on these themes as well as indications of alternative forms of organization.  We will also look at such issues as the transition from mobile to sedentary lifeways, the processes involved in the domestication of plants and animals, the emergence of cities and states, and the use of invasion-period and ethnographic information to interpret precolumbian societies in comparative perspective.

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: John Henderson (jsh6)
Full details for ARKEO 3255 : Ancient Mexico and Central America
ARKEO 3738 Identity in the Ancient World

Have you ever been asked 'who are you' or 'which group do you belong to'? You would have noted how the answer shifts according to who is asking, in which context, etc. While everyone is unique, the possible replies in any one situation are largely defined at the level of society. What is less often realized, however, is that identity shows in particular in ways of doing: what and how one eats; what one wears and when; how one moves in a space. Archaeology is in a unique position to investigate these questions, and the Greek and Roman worlds offer a fruitful test ground, both because of their varied evidence, and because of their peculiar echoing in the modern world and its manifold identities. This course will address current theories about identity and its formation, discuss the various facets of identity (e.g. gender, citizenship, ethnicity) in the Greek and Roman worlds, and introduce tools for studying identity in the past.

Distribution: (CA-AS, HST-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Astrid Van Oyen (av475)
Full details for ARKEO 3738 : Identity in the Ancient World
ARKEO 4222 Archaeological Ethics

What is the role of ethics in archaeology today? What principles shape the discipline's response to serious dilemmas? What is the relationship between ethics and politics in archaeology? This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of these questions across a range of subfields, from indigenous, public, and postcolonial archaeologies, to critical heritage studies, conflict archaeology and the archaeology of the contemporary past. We will learn the normative ethics of Western archaeology, with its concern for best practices, multiculturalism, and the politics of identity, as well as radical alternatives centered on hard politics, oppression, and justice. We will also explore the ethics of the profession, as it pertains to equity and inclusion. This course traverses the terrain of moral right and wrong in archaeology.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Lori Khatchadourian (lk323)
Full details for ARKEO 4222 : Archaeological Ethics
ARKEO 4240 Collecting Culture: Museums and Anthropology

Ethnographic and archaeological objects are widely collected, by individuals and by institutions. This course will explore the history and processes of museums and collecting, and issues around working with collections. We will work with materials in the Anthropology Collections, and also draw on other resources on campus and in the area to experience a variety of ways that museums and collections are organized, maintained, conceptualized and presented. We also will consider challenges to collecting, such as its implication in nationalist and imperialist agendas, the problems of archaeological looting and ethnographic appropriation, and indigenous expectations and demands for inclusion in such activities.

Distribution: (CA-AS, ALC-AS, GLC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Frederic Gleach (fwg1)
Full details for ARKEO 4240 : Collecting Culture: Museums and Anthropology
ARKEO 4250 Archaeological Research Design

This studio-style seminar provides an in-depth examination of the principles and practices of archaeological research design. We will examine all aspects of the research process, from concept formation, to methodology, to ethical practice and data management. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake a series of projects that will build incrementally into a research proposal. We will focus on developing the skills vital to designing archaeological research, starting with the formulation of a question and continuing through the exploratory process of defining proper sites, assemblages, analytical techniques, and presentation of findings. Class sessions will focus on designing research projects examining case studies drawn from world archaeology and student research projects.

Distribution: (HA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Adam Smith (ats73)
Full details for ARKEO 4250 : Archaeological Research Design
ARKEO 4264 Zooarchaeological Interpretation

This course follows from last semester's Zooarchaeological Method.  We will shift our emphasis here from basic skills to interpretation, although you will continue to work with archaeological bones.  We will begin by examining topics surrounding the basic interpretation of raw faunal data: sampling, quantification, taphonomy, seasonality.  We will then explore how to use faunal data to reconstruct subsistence patterns, social structure, and human-animal relations.

Distribution: (PBSS-AS, BIO-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Nerissa Russell (nr29)
Full details for ARKEO 4264 : Zooarchaeological Interpretation
ARKEO 4351 Problems in Byzantine Art

Topic Spring 22: Spiral Relief Columns. In this seminar, we will consider the Roman medium of the spiral relief column (beginning with the Columns of Trajan and Marcus Aurelius) and its reception in Constantinople (the Columns of Theodosius and Arcadius, and perhaps the Joshua Roll) and beyond (the Bernward Column in Hildesheim and the Vendôme Column in Paris, for example).

Distribution: (HA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Benjamin Anderson (bwa32)
Full details for ARKEO 4351 : Problems in Byzantine Art
ARKEO 4981 Honors Thesis Research

Independent work under the close guidance of a faculty member.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Annetta Alexandridis (aa376)
Full details for ARKEO 4981 : Honors Thesis Research
ARKEO 4982 Honors Thesis Write-Up

The student, under faculty direction, will prepare a senior thesis.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Annetta Alexandridis (aa376)
Full details for ARKEO 4982 : Honors Thesis Write-Up
ARKEO 6000 Graduate Independent Study in Archaeology

Graduate students pursue advanced topics of particular interest under the guidance of faculty member(s).

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Annetta Alexandridis (aa376)
Full details for ARKEO 6000 : Graduate Independent Study in Archaeology
ARKEO 6042 Paleoethnobotany

This course will prepare students to identify, analyze, and interpret plant remains gathered from archaeological sites. We will build a conceptual framework to explain how human behavior relates to plant patterning, drawing on case studies from around the world. Through hands-on laboratory activities, we will study aspects of plant anatomy and explore methods for the sampling and identification of plant remains, including charred seeds and wood, phytoliths, starch grains, and pollen. We will analyze paleoethnobotanical datasets using database and statistical programs to present evidence in varying formats. Final projects will involve the first-hand study of plant remains sampled from archaeological sites.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Maia Dedrick (mcd225)
Full details for ARKEO 6042 : Paleoethnobotany
ARKEO 6100 The Craft of Archaeology

This course engages students in Archaeology and related fields in a semester-long discussion of the craft of archaeology with the faculty of the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies. Each week, a different faculty member will moderate a conversation on the professional skills vital to the modern practice of archaeological research and the tools key to professionalization. Seminar topics include developing a research project and working with museum collections to matters of pedagogy and career development.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Lori Khatchadourian (lk323)
Full details for ARKEO 6100 : The Craft of Archaeology
ARKEO 6235 Bioarchaeology

Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological sites. Like forensic scientists at the scene of the crime, bioarchaeologists search for clues embedded in human bone and mummified tissues to reconstruct how ancient peoples lived and died. As a dynamic living system, the human skeleton responds not only to hormones that govern human development but also to physiological stress brought on by disease, malnutrition, and trauma. The human body is also an artifact molded by cultural understandings of gender, prestige, self-expression, and violence. In this course, students will learn the scientific techniques for estimating skeletal age and sex, diagnosing pathology, and reconstructing diet and migration patterns. This course emphasizes the critical integration of biological and cultural evidence for understanding past individuals and societies.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Matthew Velasco (mcv47)
Full details for ARKEO 6235 : Bioarchaeology
ARKEO 6245 Across the Seas: Contacts between the Americas and the Old World Before Columbus

This course considers the possibility of connections between the America and the Old World before the Spanish discovery not only as an empirical question, but also as an intensely controversial issue that has tested the limits of the scholarly detachment that archaeologists imagine characterizes their perspectives. We will consider the evidence for several possible episodes of interaction as well as the broader issue of how long-distance interaction can be recognized in the archaeological record.  Transoceanic contact is a common element in popular visions of the American past, but most professional archaeologists have rejected the possibility with great vehemence.  The issue provides an interesting case study in the power of orthodoxy in archaeology.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: John Henderson (jsh6)
Full details for ARKEO 6245 : Across the Seas: Contacts between the Americas and the Old World Before Columbus
ARKEO 6250 Archaeological Research Design

This studio-style seminar provides an in-depth examination of the principles and practices of archaeological research design. We will examine all aspects of the research process, from concept formation, to methodology, to ethical practice and data management. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake a series of projects that will build incrementally into a research proposal. We will focus on developing the skills vital to designing archaeological research, starting with the formulation of a question and continuing through the exploratory process of defining proper sites, assemblages, analytical techniques, and presentation of findings. Class sessions will focus on designing research projects examining case studies drawn from world archaeology and student research projects.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Adam Smith (ats73)
Full details for ARKEO 6250 : Archaeological Research Design
ARKEO 6255 Ancient Mexico and Central America

An introduction to ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the nature and development of societies that are arguably the most complex to develop anywhere in the precolumbian Americas. The course provides a summary of the history of the region before the European invasion, but the emphasis is on the organization of Mesoamerican societies: the distinctive features of Mesoamerican cities, economies, political systems, religion. We begin by considering Mesoamerican societies at the time of the Spanish invasion. Our focus will be on descriptions of the Aztecs of Central Mexico by Europeans and indigenous survivors, in an attempt to extract from them a model of the fundamental organizational features of one Mesoamerican society, making allowances for what we can determine about the perspectives and biases of their authors. We then review the precolumbian history of Mesoamerica looking for variations on these themes as well as indications of alternative forms of organization. We will also look at such issues as the transition from mobile to sedentary lifeways, the processes involved in the domestication of plants and animals, the emergence of cities and states, and the use of invasion-period and ethnographic information to interpret precolumbian societies in comparative perspective.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: John Henderson (jsh6)
Full details for ARKEO 6255 : Ancient Mexico and Central America
ARKEO 6351 Problems in Byzantine Art

Seminar topics rotate each semester.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Benjamin Anderson (bwa32)
Full details for ARKEO 6351 : Problems in Byzantine Art
ARKEO 6838 Identity in the Ancient World

Have you ever been asked 'who are you' or 'which group do you belong to'? You would have noted how the answer shifts according to who is asking, in which context, etc. While everyone is unique, the possible replies in any one situation are largely defined at the level of society. What is less often realized, however, is that identity shows in particular in ways of doing: what and how one eats; what one wears and when; how one moves in a space. Archaeology is in a unique position to investigate these questions, and the Greek and Roman worlds offer a fruitful test ground, both because of their varied evidence, and because of their peculiar echoing in the modern world and its manifold identities. This course will address current theories about identity and its formation, discuss the various facets of identity (e.g. gender, religion, ethnicity) in the Greek and Roman worlds, and introduce tools for studying identity in the past.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Astrid Van Oyen (av475)
Full details for ARKEO 6838 : Identity in the Ancient World
ARKEO 7222 Archaeological Ethics

What is the role of ethics in archaeology today? What principles shape the discipline's response to serious dilemmas? What is the relationship between ethics and politics in archaeology? This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of these questions across a range of subfields, from indigenous, public, and postcolonial archaeologies, to critical heritage studies, conflict archaeology and the archaeology of the contemporary past. We will learn the normative ethics of Western archaeology, with its concern for best practices, multiculturalism, and the politics of identity, as well as radical alternatives centered on hard politics, oppression, and justice. We will also explore the ethics of the profession, as it pertains to equity and inclusion. This course traverses the terrain of moral right and wrong in archaeology.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Lori Khatchadourian (lk323)
Full details for ARKEO 7222 : Archaeological Ethics
ARKEO 7240 Collecting Culture: Museums and Anthropology

Ethnographic and archaeological objects are widely collected, by individuals and by institutions. This course will explore the history and processes of museums and collecting, and issues around working with collections. We will work with materials in the Anthropology Collections, and also draw on other resources on campus and in the area to experience a variety of ways that museums and collections are organized, maintained, conceptualized and presented. We also will consider challenges to collecting, such as its implication in nationalist and imperialist agendas, the problems of archaeological looting and ethnographic appropriation, and indigenous expectations and demands for inclusion in such activities.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Frederic Gleach (fwg1)
Full details for ARKEO 7240 : Collecting Culture: Museums and Anthropology
ARKEO 7264 Zooarchaeological Interpretation

This course follows from last semester's Zooarchaeological Method.  We will shift our emphasis here from basic skills to interpretation, although you will continue to work with archaeological bones.  We will begin by examining topics surrounding the basic interpretation of raw faunal data: sampling, quantification, taphonomy, seasonality.  We will then explore how to use faunal data to reconstruct subsistence patterns, social structure, and human-animal relations.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Nerissa Russell (nr29)
Full details for ARKEO 7264 : Zooarchaeological Interpretation
ARKEO 7271 The Aegean and East Mediterranean Bronze Age c. 3000-1000 BCE

An exploration of the archaeology and art of the Aegean region and of its neighbors during the Bronze Age, ca. 3000-1000 BCE: the origins and precursors of the Classical World. The course will investigate the emergence of the first complex societies in the Aegean region in the third millennium BCE, and then the development and story of the Minoan and Mycenaean worlds and their neighbors in the second millennium BCE. Topics will include: the Early Bronze Age and the first complex societies in the Aegean (Cyclades, Crete, Greece, Anatolia); the collapse and reorientation around 2200BCE and links with climate change; the first palace civilization of (Minoan) Crete; the Santorini (Thera) volcanic eruption and its historical impact in the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean; the rise of the Mycenaean Greek palaces and the shift into proto-history; the development of an international east Mediterranean trade system; Ahhiyawa and the Hittites; the 'Trojan War'; and the collapse of the Late Bronze Age societies and links with climate change.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Sturt Manning (sm456)
Full details for ARKEO 7271 : The Aegean and East Mediterranean Bronze Age c. 3000-1000 BCE
ARKEO 8902 Master's Thesis

Students, working individually with faculty member(s), prepare a master's thesis in archaeology.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Annetta Alexandridis (aa376)
Full details for ARKEO 8902 : Master's Thesis